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  1. The Physiology of Pleasure in Hippocratic Medicine: Models and Reverberations.João Gabriel Conque - 2018 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 24:17-33.
    The main aims of this article are to demonstrate the presence of two physiological conceptions of pleasure in the Hippocratic Corpus, pointing out the differences between them and conjecturing about the reverberation of one of them in Plato’s dialogue Gorgias. We can find in texts of Greek medicine a description of pleasure produced during sexual intercourse and another related to the occurrence of pleasure during nourishment. However, the second account, unlike the first one, is strongly marked by the notion of (...)
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  • Philebus.Verity Harte - 2012 - In Gerald Press (ed.), The Continuum Companion to Plato. pp. 81-83.
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  • Pleasure, Judgment and the Function of the Painter-Scribe Analogy.Emily Fletcher - 2022 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 104 (2):199-238.
    This paper puts forward a new interpretation of the argument at Philebus 36c–40d that pleasures can be false. Protarchus raises an objection at 37e–38a, and in response Socrates presents the elaborate painter-scribe analogy. Most previous interpretations do not explain how the analogy answers Protarchus’ objection. On my account, Protarchus’ objection relies on the plausible intuition that pleasure is simply not in the business of assessing the world, and so it cannot be charged with doing so incorrectly. Socrates responds by demonstrating (...)
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  • Is Platonism Life Denying?Guilherme Domingues da Motta - 2016 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 17:95-118.
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  • Epicurus.David Konstan - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  • Pleasure.Leonard D. Katz - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Pleasure, in the inclusive usages most important in moral psychology, ethical theory, and the studies of mind, includes all joy and gladness — all our feeling good, or happy. It is often contrasted with similarly inclusive pain, or suffering, which is similarly thought of as including all our feeling bad. Contemporary psychology similarly distinguishes between positive affect and negative affect.[1..
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  • Aristotle Against Delos: Pleasure in Nicomachean Ethics X.Joachim Aufderheide - 2016 - Phronesis 61 (3):284-306.
    Two crucial questions, if unanswered, impede our understanding of Aristotle’s account of pleasure inenx.4-5: What are the activities that pleasure is said to complete? In virtue of what does pleasurealwaysaccompany these activities? The answers fall in place if we read Aristotle as responding to the Delian challenge that the finest, best and most pleasant are not united in one and the same thing. I propose an ‘ethical’ reading ofenx.4 according to which the best activities in question are those integral to (...)
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  • Sex, Wealth, and Courage: Kinds of Goods and the Power of Appearance in Plato's Protagoras.Damien Storey - 2018 - Ancient Philosophy 38 (2):241-263.
    I offer a reading of the two conceptions of the good found in Plato’s Protagoras: the popular conception—‘the many’s’ conception—and Socrates’ conception. I pay particular attention to the three kinds of goods Socrates introduces: (a) bodily pleasures like food, drink, and sex; (b) instrumental goods like wealth, health, or power; and (c) virtuous actions like courageously going to war. My reading revises existing views about these goods in two ways. First, I argue that the many are only ‘hedonists’ in a (...)
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  • Commentary on Vallejo: The Ontology of False Pleasures in the Philebus.Rachel Singpurwalla - 2009 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 24:75-80.
    In his rich and suggestive paper, Alvaro Vallejo argues for the novel thesis that Plato posits a form of pleasure in the Republic and the Philebus. Vallejo argues that the notion of a Platonic form of pleasure best explains other things that Plato says about pleasure. First, Plato draws a distinction between true pleasure and the appearance of pleasure. Second, Plato uses the same language to describe the relationship between forms and their inferior instantiations as he uses to describe the (...)
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  • Processes as Pleasures in EN Vii 11-14: A New Approach.Joachim Aufderheide - 2013 - Ancient Philosophy 33 (1):135-157.
  • Εudaimonia, Pleasure and the Defeat of Particularity.Višnja Knežević - 2020 - In The possibility of Eudaimonia (happiness and human flourishing) in the world today. Athens: International center of Greek philosophy and culture and K.B. pp. 148-161.
    In the times where the predominant description of the world has become that of the so-called “post-truth” reality, all the questions on the possibilities of leading a fulfilled life, the life of εὐδαιμονία, seem to have become irrelevant, if not unattainable. This is due to the reason that εὐδαιμονία, as such, intrinsically involves a connection with the truth and the universal. On the other hand, the concept of a fulfilled life should not exclude subjective happiness. The latter has always been (...)
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  • Utility-Enhancing Consumption Constraints.David Levy - 1988 - Economics and Philosophy 4 (1):69.
    The Greek poets and philosophers, united in a belief that men and women perceive the world around them very poorly, for this reason describe much of human behavior as fumbling for happiness in the dark. By contrast, perception failure is anathema to the modern tradition, as even the most innocent sort plays havoc with modern preference axioms.
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  • Pathos, Pleasure and the Ethical Life in Aristippus.Kristian Urstad - 2009 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy.
    For many of the ancient Greek philosophers, the ethical life was understood to be closely tied up with important notions like rational integrity, self-control, self-sufficiency, and so on. Because of this, feeling or passion (pathos), and in particular, pleasure, was viewed with suspicion. There was a general insistence on drawing up a sharp contrast between a life of virtue on the one hand and one of pleasure on the other. While virtue was regarded as rational and as integral to advancing (...)
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  • The Possibility of Modified Hedonism.Sandy Berkovski - 2012 - Theoria 78 (3):186-212.
    A popular objection to hedonist accounts of personal welfare has been the experience machine argument. Several modifications of traditional hedonism have been proposed in response. In this article I examine two such responses, recently expounded by Feldman and Sumner respectively. I argue that both modifications make hedonism indistinguishable from anti-hedonism. Sumner's account, I claim, also fails to satisfy the demands of theoretical unity.
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  • Pleasure and Illusion in Plato.Jessica Moss - 2006 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (3):503 - 535.
    Plato links pleasure with illusion, and this link explains his rejection of the view that all desires are rational desires for the good. The Protagoras and Gorgias show connections between pleasure and illusion; the Republic develops these into a psychological theory. One part of the soul is not only prone to illusions, but also incapable of the kind of reasoning that can dispel them. Pleasure appears good; therefore this part of the soul (the appetitive part) desires pleasures qua good but (...)
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  • Epicurean Happiness: A Pig's Life?David Konstan - 2012 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 6 (1).
  • The Stoic Provenance of the Notion of Prosochê.Katerina Ierodiakonou - 2021 - Rhizomata 9 (2):202-223.
    Late Stoics and, in particular, Epictetus made ample use of the notion of attention, which they understood as the soul’s vigilant focus on sense impressions and on the Stoic principles. Attention, in their view, was meant to assist our self-examination and lead to ethical progress. It was thus regarded as a Stoic good and a constitutive part of eudaimonia. Early Stoics did not seem to have invoked such a notion, whereas the Neoplatonists appropriated it into their psychology by postulating the (...)
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  • Dyschereia and Aporia: The Formation of a Philosophical Term.Wei Cheng - 2018 - TAPA 148 (1):75-110.
    Plato’s nephew Speusippus has been widely accepted as the historical person behind the mask of the anti-hedonists in Phlb. 42b–44c. This hypothesis is supported by, inter alia, the link between Socrates’ char- acterization of them as δυσχερεῖς and the frequent references of δυσχέρεια as ἀπορία to Speusippus in Aristotle’s Metaphysics MN. This study argues against assigning any privileged status to Speusippus in the assimilation of δυσχέρεια with ἀπορία. Instead, based on a comprehensive survey of how δυσχερ- words were used in (...)
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  • Neutral, Natural and Hedonic State in Plato.Wei Cheng - 2019 - Mnemosyne 4 (72):525-549.
    This paper aims to clarify Plato’s notions of the natural and the neutral state in relation to hedonic properties. Contra two extreme trends among scholars—people either conflate one state with the other, or keep them apart as to establish an unsurmount- able gap between both states, I argue that neither view accurately reflects Plato’s position because the natural state is real and can coincide with the neutral state in part, whereas the latter, as an umbrella term, can also be realized (...)
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  • Misunderstanding the Myth in the Gorgias.Daniel C. Russel - 2001 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (4):557-573.
  • Stoicism Bibliography.Ronald H. Epp - 1985 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (S1):125-171.
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  • A Topical Bibliography of Scholarship on Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics: 1880 to 2004.Thornton C. Lockwood - 2005 - Journal of Philosophical Research 30:1-116.
    Scholarship on Aristotle’s NICOMACHEAN ETHICS (hereafter “the Ethics”) flourishes in an almost unprecedented fashion. In the last ten years, universities in North America have produced on average over ten doctoral dissertations a year that discuss the practical philosophy that Aristotle espouses in his Nicomachean Ethics, Eudemian Ethics, and Politics. Since the beginning of the millennium there have been three new translations of the entire Ethics into English alone, several more that translate parts of the work into English and other modern (...)
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  • Aristotle and Eudoxus on the Argument From Contraries.Wei Cheng - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (4):588-618.
    The debate over the value of pleasure among Eudoxus, Speusippus, and Aristotle is dramatically documented by the Nicomachean Ethics, particularly in the dialectical pros-and-cons concerning the so-called argument from contraries. Two similar versions of this argument are preserved at EN VII. 13, 1153b1–4, and X. 2, 1172b18–20. Many scholars believe that the argument at EN VII is either a report or an appropriation of the Eudoxean argument in EN X. This essay aims to revise this received view. It will explain (...)
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  • Socrates, Vlastos, Scanlon and the Principle of the Sovereignty of Virtue.Daniel Simão Nascimento - 2020 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 30:e03009.
    This article offers a new formulation of the Socratic principle known as the Principle of the Sovereignty of Virtue. It is divided in three sections. In the first section I criticize Vlastos’ formulation of the PSV. In the second section I present the weighing model of practical deliberation, introduce the concepts of reason for action, simple reason, sufficient reason and conclusive reason that were offered by Thomas Scanlon in Being realistic about reasons, and then I adapt these concepts so as (...)
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  • Phaecian Dido: Lost Pleasures of an Epicurean Intertext.Pamela Gordon - 1998 - Classical Antiquity 17 (2):188-211.
    Commentators since antiquity have seen connections between Virgil's Dido and the philosophy of the Garden, and several recent studies have drawn attention to the echoes of Lucretius in the first and fourth books of the Aeneid. This essay proposes that there is an even richer and more extensive Epicurean presence intertwined with the Dido episode. Although Virgilian quotations of Lucretius provide the most obvious references to Epicureanism, too narrow a focus on the traces of the De Rerum Natura obscures important (...)
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  • The Pleasures of the Comic and of Socratic Inquiry.Mitchell Miller - 2008 - Arethusa 41 (2):263-289.
    At Apology 33c Socrates explains that "some people enjoy … my company" because "they … enjoy hearing those questioned who think they are wise but are not." At Philebus 48a-50b he makes central to his account of the pleasure of laughing at comedy the exposé of the self-ignorance of those who presume themselves wise. Does the latter passage explain the pleasure of watching Socrates at work? I explore this by tracing the admixture of pain, the causes, and the "natural harmony" (...)
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  • Prudence, Rationality and Happiness in Aristippus.Kristian Urstad - 2008 - Gnosis.
    It is noticeably clear from several ancient sources that the hedonist Aristippus of Cyrene (a friend and student of Socrates) asks us to concentrate on enjoying the pleasures of the present or near­ future. What is not so obvious is his reason for such a recommendation. Although any explanation for this is bound to be somewhat speculative due to the inadequacy of the sources, I would like to offer a possible rationale for, and subsequent reconstruction of, his view, one which (...)
     
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  • Pleasure, Falsity, and the Good in Plato's "Philebus".Ciriaco Medina Sayson - 1999 - Dissertation, University of Massachusetts Amherst
    The argument in Plato's Philebus presents three successive formulations of the hedonist principle. Commentators often take Socrates' argument in the dialogue to be dealing solely with the third formulation, which states that pleasure, rather than intelligence, is closer in nature to the good. I argue that, nonetheless, in the dialogue Socrates remained concerned to provide a direct refutation of the first formulation, that is, of the straightforward claim that pleasure is the good for all living beings. ;Chapter One ascribes to (...)
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  • Colloquium 5: Plato’s Anti-Hedonism.Gunter Figal - 2008 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 23 (1):187-204.
  • Anscombe and Aristotle on Corrupt Minds.K. L. Flannery - 2008 - Christian Bioethics 14 (2):151-164.
  • Propositional Pleasures in Plato’s Philebus.Fernando Muniz - 2014 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 8 (1):49.
  • The Concept of Pleasure: Plato Versus Greek's Manner of Life.Aysun Aydin - 2013 - Ethos: Dialogues in Philosophy and Social Sciences 6 (2).
    The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast Plato’s concept of pleasure and the place of this concept in Greek’s manner of life. In general, the daily life of Greek society is based on simplicity and temperance, which simply aims at avoiding extremism of any kind. However, some studies show that social togetherness for celebrations and excessiveness in bodily pleasure are constantly seen in this society. Yet, against this background Plato emphasizes the importance of putting restraints on bodily (...)
     
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  • Aisthēsis, Reason and Appetite in the Timaeus.Emily Fletcher - 2016 - Phronesis 61 (4):397-434.
  • Managing Mental Pain: Epicurus Vs. Aristippus on the Pre-Rehearsal of Future Ills.Margaret Graver - 2002 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 17 (1):155-184.
  • Commentary on Bobonich.Jyl Gentzler - 1995 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 11 (1):140-153.
    Bobonich argues that, in the Laws, Plato is committed to the view that the goodness of all goods entirely distinct from virtue is dependent on the virtue of their possessor. He suggests further that Plato's commitment to this dependency thesis is best explained by Plato's commitment to two other theses: (1) that knowledge is sufficient for all virtue, and (2) that the goodness of goods entirely distinct from virtue depends on their possessor's knowledge of the nature of their goodness. While (...)
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  • Commentary on Mitsis.Gisela Striker - 1988 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 4 (1):323-354.
  • On the Value of Drunkenness in the Laws.Nicholas Baima - 2017 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 20 (1):65-81.
    Plato’s attitude towards drunkenness (μέθη) is surprisingly positive in the Laws, especially as compared to his negative treatment of intoxication in the Republic. In the Republic, Plato maintains that intoxication causes cowardice and intemperance (3.398e-399e, 3.403e, and 9.571c-573b), while in the Laws, Plato holds that it can produce courage and temperance (1.635b, 1.645d-650a, and 2.665c-672d). This raises the question: Did Plato change his mind, and if he did, why? Ultimately, this paper answers affirmatively and argues that this marks a substantive (...)
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  • Editors' Note.Rory W. Collins & Anita S. Pillai - 2020 - Undergraduate Philosophy Journal of Australasia 2 (2):iv-v.
    Here, we outline UPJA’s recent developments and the contents of Volume 2, Issue 2.
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  • Creencia, estado afectivo y verdad: placeres de expectativa en el Filebo de Platón.José Antonio Giménez Salinas - 2016 - Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 33 (2):395-418.
    Una de las cuestiones más discutidas en el debate contemporáneo sobre el Filebo de Platón, es sin duda la de la posibilidad de los placeres falsos. En el contexto de esta discusión ha sido el pasaje 36c-41b, referido en particular a la falsedad de los placeres de expectativa, el que ha suscitado la mayor controversia y una gran variedad de interpretaciones. Las distintas posiciones se distinguen según hagan uso del criterio de verdad “ontológico”, “epistemológico” o “moral” para la comprensión de (...)
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  • Prazer E Virtude Segundo Aristóteles.Juliana Ortegosa Aggio - 2013 - Doispontos 10 (2).
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  • Colloquium 4.Glenn Lesses - 1990 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 6 (1):141-150.
  • Socrates And The Patients: Republic IX, 583c-585a.James Warren - 2011 - Phronesis 56 (2):113-137.
    Republic IX 583c-585a presents something surprisingly unusual in ancient accounts of pleasure and pain: an argument in favour of the view that there are three relevant hedonic states: pleasure, pain, and an intermediate. The argument turns on the proposal that a person's evaluation of their current state may be misled by a comparison with a prior or subsequent state. The argument also refers to `pure' and anticipated pleasures. The brief remarks in the Republic may appear cursory or clumsy in comparison (...)
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  • Plato on Pure Pleasure and the Best Life.Emily Fletcher - 2014 - Phronesis 59 (2):113-142.
    In the Philebus, Socrates maintains two theses about the relationship between pleasure and the good life: the mixed life of pleasure and intelligence is better than the unmixed life of intelligence, and: the unmixed life of intelligence is the most divine. Taken together, these two claims lead to the paradoxical conclusion that the best human life is better than the life of a god. A popular strategy for avoiding this conclusion is to distinguish human from divine goods; on such a (...)
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  • The Erlangen Papyrus 4 and Its Socratic Origins.Menahem Luz - 2014 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 8 (2):161-191.
    P. Erlangen 4 is papyrus fragment of an ancient Greek, “Socratic” dialogue discussing cures for the of the beautiful—and, by implication, the meaning of moral beauty itself. Previous discussions have made general comparisons with the works of Plato, Xenophon and Aeschines. Prior to its philosophical analysis, I will re-examine the fragment, suggesting new reconstructions of the text, accompanied by an English translation. Although the precise authorship still remains a mystery, I will attempt to show that its philosophical language, argument and (...)
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