Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Aristotle on Epigenesis.Devin Henry - manuscript
    It has become somewhat of a platitude to call Aristotle the first epigenesist insofar as he thought form and structure emerged gradually from an unorganized, amorphous embryo. But modern biology now recognizes two senses of “epigenesis”. The first is this more familiar idea about the gradual emergence of form and structure, which is traditionally opposed to the idea of preformationism. But modern biologists also use “epigenesis” to emphasize the context-dependency of the process itself. Used in this sense development is not (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • El modelo geométrico y el movimiento circular en el De Motu Animalium de Aristóteles.Angel Augusto Pasquale - 2016 - Dissertation, Universidad Nacional de La Plata
  • Method and Metaphor in Aristotle's Science of Nature.Sean Michael Coughlin - 2013 - Dissertation, University of Western Ontario
    This dissertation is a collection of essays exploring the role of metaphor in Aristotle’s scientific method. Aristotle often appeals to metaphors in his scientific practice; but in the Posterior Analytics, he suggests that their use is inimical to science. Why, then, does he use them in natural science? And what does his use of metaphor in science reveal about the nature of his scientific investigations? I approach these questions by investigating the epistemic status of metaphor in Aristotelian science. In the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Two Directions for Teleology: Naturalism and Idealism.Andrew Cooper - 2018 - Synthese 195 (7):3097-3119.
    Philosophers of biology claim that function talk is consistent with naturalism. Yet recent work in biology places new pressure on this claim. An increasing number of biologists propose that the existence of functions depends on the organisation of systems. While systems are part of the domain studied by physics, they are capable of interacting with this domain through organising principles. This is to say that a full account of biological function requires teleology. Does naturalism preclude reference to teleological causes? Or (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Wish, Motivation and the Human Good in Aristotle.Gösta Grönroos - 2015 - Phronesis 60 (1):60-87.
    _ Source: _Volume 60, Issue 1, pp 60 - 87 Aristotle invokes a specifically human desire, namely wish, to provide a teleological explanation of the pursuit of the specifically human good in terms of virtuous activity. Wish is a basic, unreasoned desire which, independently of other desires, or evaluative attitudes, motivates the pursuit of the human good. Even a person who pursues what she mistakenly believes to be good is motivated by wish for what in fact is good, although she (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations