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  1. Did We Trade Freedom for Credit? Finance, Domination, and the Political Economy of Freedom.Joshua Preiss - 2018 - European Journal of Political Theory 20 (3).
    This article concerns freedom and financial markets. First, I consider the republican case for liberalization, extending Robert Taylor’s economic model of republicanism to financial markets. This case adopts what I call a “philosopher-king” approach to political theory, arguing by reference an ideal or first-best set of policies or reforms. Then, I investigate the negative externalities of several decades of financial market liberalization, including the erosion of political accountability and the growing concentration of political and economic power in the hands of (...)
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  • Freedom, Money and Justice as Fairness.Blain Neufeld - 2017 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 16 (1):70-92.
    The first principle of Rawls’s conception of justice secures a set of ‘basic liberties’ equally for all citizens within the constitutional structure of society. The ‘worth’ of citizens’ liberties, however, may vary depending upon their wealth. Against Rawls, Cohen contends that an absence of money often can directly constrain citizens’ freedom and not simply its worth. This is because money often can remove legally enforced constraints on what citizens can do. Cohen’s argument – if modified to apply to citizens’ ‘moral (...)
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  • Neo-Classical Liberalism, ‘Market Freedom’, and the Right to Private Property.Gavin Kerr - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-22.
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  • Welcome to the Dark Side: A Classical-Liberal Argument for Economic Democracy.Alex Gourevitch - 2014 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 26 (3-4):290-305.
    ABSTRACTJohn Tomasi's Free Market Fairness claims to provide a principled defense of classical-liberal institutions. Respect for the development of our moral powers or “self-authorship,” according to Tomasi, requires that we make certain economic liberties basic, including freedom of contract and the right to accumulate property. Yet Tomasi's principles and his institutions are at odds. Tomasi has provided ethical grounds for defending not classical-liberal but radical-democratic, even socialist, economic freedoms. This is most vivid in Tomasi's account of the “liberties of working.” (...)
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