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  1. Why Don’T Zebras Have Machine Guns? Adaptation, Selection, and Constraints in Evolutionary Theory.Timothy Shanahan - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 39 (1):135-146.
  • Radicals and Revolution.Mark E. Borrello - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 35 (1):209-216.
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  • Radicals and Revolution.Mark E. Borrello - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 35 (1):209-216.
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  • Evolution and Constraints on Variation: Variant Specification and Range of Assessment.Trevor Pearce - 2011 - Philosophy of Science 78 (5):739-751.
    There is still a great deal of debate over what counts as a constraint and about how to assess experimentally the relative importance of constraints and selection in evolutionary history. I will argue that the notion of a constraint on variation, and thus the selection-constraint distinction, depends on two specifications: (1) what counts as a variant -- constraints limit or bias the production of what? and (2) range of assessment -- over what range of times or conditions is the variation (...)
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  • Why Don't Zebras Have Machine Guns Adaptation, Selection, and Constraints in Evolutionary Theory.Timothy Shanahan - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 39 (1):135-146.
    In an influential paper, Stephen Jay Gould and Richard Lewontin contrasted selection-driven adaptation with phylogenetic, architectural, and developmental constraints as distinct causes of phenotypic evolution. In subsequent publications Gould has elaborated this distinction into one between a narrow “Darwinian Fundamentalist” emphasis on “external functionalist” processes, and a more inclusive “pluralist” emphasis on “internal structuralist” principles. Although theoretical integration of functionalist and structuralist explanations is the ultimate aim, natural selection and internal constraints are treated as distinct causes of evolutionary change. This (...)
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