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The intellectuals (From Prison notebooks)

In Richard Kearney & Mara Rainwater (eds.), The Continental Philosophy Reader. Routledge (1996)

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  1. “Just Testing”: Race, Sex, and the Media in New York's “Baby Aids” Debate.Karen M. Booth - 2000 - Gender and Society 14 (5):644-661.
    In 1993, debates over mandatory HIV testing reemerged in New York when politicians and journalists launched a compaign to “unblind” results of a survey of HIV prevalence in newborns. This article reports on the findings from a content analysis of 108 “Baby AIDS” news stories published in New York newspapers in 1993 and 1994. In constructing a discourse of blame for the infection of “innocent” babies, “Baby AIDS” news stories demonstrate that racist, heterosexist, and sexist assumptions about HIV transmission, motherhood, (...)
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  • Styles of Radical Will: What’s in a (Sub) Title?Andrew Milner - 2010 - Thesis Eleven 100 (1):61-66.
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  • Intellectuals, Values and Society.Milton Fisk - 1989 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 15 (2):151-165.
  • Public Sociology and Democratic Theory.Stephen Turner - 2007 - In Jeroen Van Bouwel (ed.), The Social Sciences and Democracy. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Sociology, as conceived by Comte, was to put an end to the anarchy of opinions characteristic of liberal democracy by replacing opinion with the truths of sociology, imposed through indoctrination. Later sociologists backed away from this, making sociology acceptable to liberal democracy by being politically neutral. The critics of this solution asked 'whose side are we on?' Burawoy provides a novel justification for advocacy scholarship in sociology. Public sociology is intended to have political effects, but also to be funded by (...)
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  • Can There Be a Pragmatist Philosophy of Social Science?Stephen P. Turner - 2009 - Human Studies 32 (3):365-374.
    Many, and perhaps most, American philosophers will, if pressed, say that they are pragmatists. What they typically mean by this is that they think there is some class of philosophical questions that can’t be answered philosophically. If you don’t think that in the end philosophical arguments can possibly settle metaphysical questions, pragmatism is an appealing response. Pragmatism becomes a kind of default position which one reverts to when one removes a topic from the list of topics that can be reasonably (...)
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  • The Significance of Shils.Stephen Turner - 1999 - Sociological Theory 17 (2):125-145.
    Edward Shils was a widely recognized but misunderstood thinker. The original contexts of his thought are not well understood and greatly distorted by associating him with the concerns of Parsons. Shils provides a fully comparable alternative to the thought of Habermas and Foucault, with essentially similar roots: practice theory, the dissolution of Marxism in the twenties, and Carl Schmitt. Though Shils was indebted to the American sociological tradition, with respect to these issues his sources were outside it: in Hendrik de (...)
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  • Time, Magic, and Gynecology Contemporary Israeli Practice.Miriam Jacoby - 1995 - Science in Context 8 (1):231-248.
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  • The 'Second Chance' Myth: Equality of Opportunity in Irish Adult Education Policies.Bernie Grummell - 2007 - British Journal of Educational Studies 55 (2):182 - 201.
    This article explores the 'second chance' myth that surrounds the role of adult education in society. This myth apparently offers all citizens an equal chance to access educational opportunities to improve their life chances. I argue that recent developments in educational policy-making are increasingly shaped by neoliberal discourses that adapt adult education principles, such as lifelong learning and emancipation, for its own economic and political logic. This has important implications for adult education, especially equality of opportunity and social inclusion.
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