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  1. Bayesian Inference, Predictive Coding and Delusions.Rick A. Adams, Harriet R. Brown & Karl J. Friston - 2014 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 5 (3):51-88.
  • Aberrant Salience Across Levels of Processing in Positive and Negative Schizotypy.Charlotte A. Chun, Peter Brugger & Thomas R. Kwapil - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • Overworking the Hippocampus.Daniel C. Dennett - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):677-678.
    Gray mistakenly thinks I have rejected the sort of theoretical enterprise he is undertaking, because, according to him, I think that "more data" is all that is needed to resolve all the issues. Not at all. My stalking horse was the bizarre (often pathetic) claim that no amount of empirical, "third-person point-of-view" science (data plus theory) could ever reduce the residue of mystery about consciousness to zero. This "New Mysterianism" (Flanagan, 1991) is one that he should want to combat as (...)
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  • Beyond Consciousness of External Reality: A ''Who'' System for Consciousness of Action and Self-Consciousness.Nicolas Georgieff & Marc Jeannerod - 1998 - Consciousness and Cognition 7 (3):465-477.
    This paper offers a framework for consciousness of internal reality. Recent PET experiments are reviewed, showing partial overlap of cortical activation during self-produced actions and actions observed from other people. This overlap suggests that representations for actions may be shared by several individuals, a situation which creates a potential problem for correctly attributing an action to its agent. The neural conditions for correct agency judgments are thus assigned a key role in self/other distinction and self-consciousness. A series of behavioral experiments (...)
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  • Mirroring Cannot Account for Understanding Action.Jeremy I. M. Carpendale & Charlie Lewis - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):23-24.
    Susan Hurley's shared circuits model (SCM) rightly begins in action and progresses through a series of layers; but it fails to reach action understanding because it relies on mirroring as a driving force, draws on heavily criticized theories, and neglects the need for shared experience in our grasp of social understanding.
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  • Eluding the Illusion? Schizophrenia, Dopamine and the McGurk Effect.Thomas P. White, Rebekah L. Wigton, Dan W. Joyce, Tracy Bobin, Christian Ferragamo, Nisha Wasim, Stephen Lisk & Sukhwinder S. Shergill - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  • The Virtual Bodily Self: Mentalisation of the Body as Revealed in Anosognosia for Hemiplegia.Aikaterini Fotopoulou - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 33:500-510.
  • The Shared Circuits Model. How Control, Mirroring, and Simulation Can Enable Imitation and Mind Reading.Susan L. Hurley - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):1-22.
    Imitation, deliberation, and mindreading are characteristically human sociocognitive skills. Research on imitation and its role in social cognition is flourishing across various disciplines; it is here surveyed under headings of behavior, subpersonal mechanisms, and functions of imitation. A model is then advanced within which many of the developments surveyed can be located and explained. The shared circuits model explains how imitation, deliberation, and mindreading can be enabled by subpersonal mechanisms of control, mirroring and simulation. It is cast at a middle, (...)
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  • Synchronous Dynamics for Cognitive Coordination: But How?M.-A. Tagamets & Barry Horwitz - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):106-107.
    Although interesting, the hypotheses proposed by Phillips & Silverstein lack unifying structure both in specific mechanisms and in cited evidence. They provide little to support the notion that low-level sensory processing and high-level cognitive coordination share dynamic grouping by synchrony as a common processing mechanism. We suggest that more realistic large-scale modeling at multiple levels is needed to address these issues.
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  • Convergence of Biological and Psychological Perspectives on Cognitive Coordination in Schizophrenia.William A. Phillips & Steven M. Silverstein - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):65-82.
    The concept of locally specialized functions dominates research on higher brain function and its disorders. Locally specialized functions must be complemented by processes that coordinate those functions, however, and impairment of coordinating processes may be central to some psychotic conditions. Evidence for processes that coordinate activity is provided by neurobiological and psychological studies of contextual disambiguation and dynamic grouping. Mechanisms by which this important class of cognitive functions could be achieved include those long-range connections within and between cortical regions that (...)
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  • Predicting the Self: Lessons From Schizophrenia.Valerie Gray Hardcastle - 2019 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 10 (2):381-400.
    Newly developed Bayesian perspectives on schizophrenia hold out the promise that a common underlying mechanism can account for many, if not all, of the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. If this is the case, then understanding how schizophrenic minds go awry could shine light on how healthy minds maintain a sense of self. This article investigates this Bayesian promise by examining whether the approach can indeed account for the difficulties with self-awareness experienced in schizophrenia. While I conclude that it cannot, I (...)
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  • Immersion in Altered Experience: An Investigation of the Relationship Between Absorption and Psychopathology.Cherise Rosen, Nev Jones, Kayla A. Chase, Jennifer K. Melbourne, Linda S. Grossman & Rajiv P. Sharma - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 49:215-226.
  • Neurobiology of the Structure of Personality: Dopamine, Facilitation of Incentive Motivation, and Extraversion.Richard A. Depue & Paul F. Collins - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):491-517.
    Extraversion has two central characteristics: (1) interpersonalengagement, which consists of affiliation (enjoying and valuing close interpersonal bonds, being warm and affectionate) and agency (being socially dominant, enjoying leadership roles, being assertive, being exhibitionistic, and having a sense of potency in accomplishing goals) and (2) impulsivity, which emerges from the interaction of extraversion and a second, independent trait (constraint). Agency is a more general motivational disposition that includes dominance, ambition, mastery, efficacy, and achievement. Positive affect (a combination of positive feelings and (...)
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  • Problems in the Definition of 'Mental Disorder'.Derek Bolton - 2001 - Philosophical Quarterly 51 (203):182-199.
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  • Dopaminergic Basis of the Psychosis-Prone Personality Investigated with Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Procedural Learning.Ulrich Ettinger, Philip J. Corr, Ardeshier Mofidi, Steven C. R. Williams & Veena Kumari - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  • Consciousness and its (Dis)Contents.Jeffrey A. Gray - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):703-722.
    The first claim in the target article was that there is as yet no transparent, causal account of the relations between consciousness and brain-and-behaviour. That claim remains firm. The second claim was that the contents of consciousness consist, psychologically, of the outputs of a comparator system; the third consisted of a description of the brain mechanisms proposed to instantiate the comparator. In order to defend these claims against criticism, it has been necessary to clarify the distinction between consciousness-as-such and the (...)
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  • The Limits of Neuropsychological Models of Consciousness.Max Velmans - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):702-703.
    This commentary elaborates on Gray's conclusion that his neurophysiological model of consciousness might explain how consciousness arises from the brain, but does not address how consciousness evolved, affects behaviour or confers survival value. The commentary argues that such limitations apply to all neurophysiological or other third-person perspective models. To approach such questions the first-person nature of consciousness needs to be taken seriously in combination with third-person models of the brain.
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  • Consciousness Does Not Seem to Be Linked to a Single Neural Mechanism.Carlo Umiltà & Marco Zorzi - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):701-702.
  • On Giving a More Active and Selective Role to Consciousness.Frederick Toates - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):700-701.
  • Don't Leave the “Un” Off “Consciousness”.Neal R. Swerdlow - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):699-700.
  • Ultimate Differences.G. Lynn Stephens & George Graham - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):698-699.
  • The Homunculus at Home.J. David Smith - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):697-698.
  • Consciousness Beyond the Comparator.Victor A. Shames & Timothy L. Hubbard - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):697-697.
  • Communication and Consciousness: A Neural Network Conjecture.N. A. Schmajuk & E. Axelrad - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):695-696.
  • Prospects for a Cognitive Neuroscience of Consciousness.Antti Revonsuo - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):694-695.
  • Unitary Consciousness Requires Distributed Comparators and Global Mappings.George N. Reeke - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):693-694.
  • The Elusive Quale.Howard Rachlin - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):692-693.
  • Reticular-Thalamic Activation of the Cortex Generates Conscious Contents.James Newman - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):691-692.
    Gray hypothesizes that the contents of consciousness correspond to the outputs of a subicular (hippocampal/temporal lobe) comparator that compares the current state of the organism's perceptual world with a predicted state. I argue that Gray has identified a key contributing system to conscious awareness, but that his model is inadequate for explaining how conscious contents are generated in the brain. An alternative model is offered.
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  • The Control of Consciousness Via a Neuropsychological Feedback Loop.Todd D. Nelson - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):690-691.
  • Comparators, Functions, and Experiences.Harold Merskey - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):689-690.
  • Human Consciousness: One of a Kind.R. E. Lubow - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):689-689.
  • Correlating Mind and Body.T. J. Lioyd-Jones, N. Donnelly & B. Weekes - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):688-688.
  • Septohippocampal Comparator: Consciousness Generator or Attention Feedback Loop?Marcel Kinsbourne - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):687-688.
  • Information Synthesis in Cortical Areas as an Important Link in Brain Mechanisms of Mind.Alexei M. Ivanitsky - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):686-687.
  • Mind – Your Head!R. P. Ingvaldsen & H. T. A. Whiting - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):685-686.
  • Perspective, Reflection, Transparent Explanation, and Other Minds.S. L. Hurley - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):684-685.
  • Psychopathology and the Discontinuity of Conscious Experience.David R. Hemsley - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):683-684.
  • Consciousness is for Other People.Chris Frith - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):682-683.
  • On Seeking the Mythical Fountain of Consciousness.Jeffrey Foss - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):682-682.
  • Context and Consciousness.Colin G. Ellard - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):681-682.
  • Consciousness, Memory, and the Hippocampal System: What Kind of Connections Can We Make?Howard Eichenbaum & Neal J. Cohen - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):680-681.
  • Hunting for Consciousness in the Brain: What is the Game?José-Luis Díaz - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):679-680.
  • Possible Roles for a Predictor Plus Comparator Mechanism in Human Episodic Recognition Memory and Imitative Learning.Simon Dennis & Michael Humphreys - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):678-679.
  • Segmentalized Consciousness in Schizophrenia.Andrew Crider - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):676-677.
  • The Contents of Consciousness: A Neuropsychological Conjecture.Jeffrey A. Gray - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):659-76.
    Drawing on previous models of anxiety, intermediate memory, the positive symptoms of schizophrenia, and goal-directed behaviour, a neuropsychological hypothesis is proposed for the generation of the contents of consciousness. It is suggested that these correspond to the outputs of a comparator that, on a moment-by-moment basis, compares the current state of the organism's perceptual world with a predicted state. An outline is given of the information-processing functions of the comparator system and of the neural systems which mediate them. The hypothesis (...)
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  • The Shared Circuits Model (SCM): How Control, Mirroring, and Simulation Can Enable Imitation, Deliberation, and Mindreading.Susan Hurley - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):1-22.
    Imitation, deliberation, and mindreading are characteristically human sociocognitive skills. Research on imitation and its role in social cognition is flourishing across various disciplines. Imitation is surveyed in this target article under headings of behavior, subpersonal mechanisms, and functions of imitation. A model is then advanced within which many of the developments surveyed can be located and explained. The shared circuits model (SCM) explains how imitation, deliberation, and mindreading can be enabled by subpersonal mechanisms of control, mirroring, and simulation. It is (...)
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  • Is Schizophrenia a Disorder of Consciousness? Experimental and Phenomenological Support for Anomalous Unconscious Processing.Anne Giersch & Aaron L. Mishara - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
    Decades ago, several authors have proposed that disorders in automatic processing lead to intrusive symptoms or abnormal contents in the consciousness of people with schizophrenia. However, since then, studies have mainly highlighted difficulties in patients’ conscious experiencing and processing but rarely explored how unconscious and conscious mechanisms may interact in producing this experience. We report three lines of research, focusing on the processing of spatial frequencies, unpleasant information, and time-event structure that suggest that impairments occur at both the unconscious and (...)
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  • Civilized Madness: Schizophrenia, Self-Consciousness and the Modern Mind.Louis A. Sass - 1994 - History of the Human Sciences 7 (2):83-120.
  • The Sound Of One Hand Clapping.J. Gray - 2002 - PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research On Consciousness 8.
    The 'non-sensory' feelings of familiarity, rightness and tip-of-the-tongue postulated in the target article all find a natural explanation within existing models, including Gray's comparator model, of the way in which top-down and bottom-up processing interact to select the contents of consciousness.
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  • Looking for the Agent: An Investigation Into Consciousness of Action and Self-Consciousness in Schizophrenic Patients.E. Daprati, N. Franck, N. Georgieff, Joëlle Proust, Elisabeth Pacherie, J. Dalery & Marc Jeannerod - 1997 - Cognition 65 (1):71-86.
    The abilities to attribute an action to its proper agent and to understand its meaning when it is produced by someone else are basic aspects of human social communication. Several psychiatric syndromes, such as schizophrenia, seem to lead to a dysfunction of the awareness of one’s own action as well as of recognition of actions performed by other. Such syndromes offer a framework for studying the determinants of agency, the ability to correctly attribute actions to their veridical source. Thirty normal (...)
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