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  1. Touched by the Past.Richard Ellis - 2021 - Classical Antiquity 40 (1):1-44.
    Recent work on trauma, especially in the field of Holocaust studies, has tackled the question of how the “generation after” relates, and relates to, the trauma of its immediate ancestors as it navigates between the poles of remembrance and appropriation. Other studies have shifted focus towards the effects of trauma upon narration, in part through critiquing the prevailing psycho-analytic model of trauma as an unrepresentable event that evades/forecloses language. Aeschylus’ Suppliants, with its chorus of fifty female Danaids who react to (...)
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  • Between Physician and Athlete: The Idea of the Trainer in Epinician Poetry.Nigel Nicholson - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 47 (3):377-390.
    Trainers played an immensely important role in ancient sports. Yet, they often disappear in the descriptions of great athletic feats in epinician poetry, the poems of praise that celebrated great a...
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  • Private and Public: Links Between Symposion and Syssition in Fifth-Century Athens.Ann Steiner - 2002 - Classical Antiquity 21 (2):347-390.
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  • From Ponêêros to Pharmakos: Theater, Social Drama, and Revolution in Athens, 428-404 BCE.David Rosenbloom - 2002 - Classical Antiquity 21 (2):283-346.
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  • Educating Croesus: Talking and Learning in Herodotus' Lydian {Logos.Christopher Pelling - 2006 - Classical Antiquity 25 (1):141-177.
    Two themes, the elusiveness of wisdom and the distortion of speech, are traced through three important scenes of Herodotus' Lydian logos, the meeting of Solon and Croesus , the scene where Cyrus places Croesus on the pyre , and the advice of Croesus to Cyrus to cross the river and fight the Massagetae in their own territory . The paper discusses whether Solon is speaking indirectly at 1.29–33, unable to talk straight to Croesus about his transgressive behavior: if so, that (...)
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  • Framing the Gift: The Politics of the Siphnian Treasury at Delphi.Richard T. Neer - 2001 - Classical Antiquity 20 (2):273-344.
    Thêsauroi, or treasure-houses, are small, temple-like structures, found typically in the sanctuaries of Delphi and Olympia. They were built by Greek city-states to house the dedications of their citizens. But a thêsauros is not just a storeroom: it is also a frame for costly votives, a way of diverting elite display in the interest of the city. When placed on view in a treasure-house, the individual dedication is re-contextualized: although it still reflects well on its dedicant, it also glorifies the (...)
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  • Dangerous Gifts: Ideologies of Marriage and Exchange in Ancient Greece.Deborah Lyons - 2003 - Classical Antiquity 22 (1):93-134.
    A familiar theme in Greek myth is that of the deadly gift that passes between a man and a woman. Analysis of exchanges between men and women reveals the gendered nature of exchange in ancient Greek mythic thinking. Using the anthropological categories of male and female wealth , it is possible to arrive at an understanding of the protocols of exchange as they relate to men and especially to women. These protocols, which are based in part on the distinction between (...)
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  • Women, Property, and Surveillance in Classical Athens.Steven Johnstone - 2003 - Classical Antiquity 22 (2):247-274.
    While it is sometimes thought that free Athenian women were hemmed in by surveillance within the oikos, this article argues that the obstacle that impeded them when they attempted to control property was that they were excluded from the impersonal and formal systems of surveillance of male citizens. Athenian public life, lived in the view of others, dramatically extended the agency of those within it. While women could compensate for their legal incapacities by cultivating the personal trust of men, this (...)
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  • Myth and Genre on Athenian Vases.Gloria Ferrari - 2003 - Classical Antiquity 22 (1):37-54.
    With the notable exceptions of Jan Bazˇant and Paul Harvey, most scholars subscribe to the idea that the representational scenes on Greek vases fall into one of two main categories: either myth or "genre," whose frame of reference is everyday life. This article challenges this distinction and makes a plea for its abandonment.
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  • Monkey Business: Imitation, Authenticity, and Identity From Pithekoussai to Plautus.Catherine Connors - 2004 - Classical Antiquity 23 (2):179-207.
    This essay explores references to monkeys as a way of talking about imitation, authenticity, and identity in Greek stories about the “Monkey Island” Pithekoussai and in Athenian insults, and in Plautus' comedy. In early Greek contexts, monkey business defines what it means to be aristocratic and authoritative. Classical Athenians use monkeys to think about what it means to be authentically Athenian: monkey business is a figure for behavior which threatens democratic culture—sycophancy or other deceptions of the people. Plautus' monkey imagery (...)
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  • Herodotus' Use of Attic Tragedy in the Lydian Logos.Charles C. Chiasson - 2003 - Classical Antiquity 22 (1):5-35.
    This essay explains the appearance of tragic narrative patterns and motifs in the Croesus logos not as a passive manifestation of "tragic influence," but as a self-conscious textual strategy whereby Herodotus makes his narratives familiar and engaging while also demonstrating the distinctive traits of his own innovative discourse, historie. Herodotus' purposive appropriation and modification of tragic technique manifests the critical engagement with other authors and literary genres that is one of the defining features of the Histories. Herodotus embellishes the story (...)
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  • "We the Others": Interpretive Community and Plural Voice in Herodotus.David Chamberlain - 2001 - Classical Antiquity 20 (1):5-34.
    When Herodotus uses the first person plural in phrases like "We know," "We say," and so on, the modern reader naturally takes this either to refer to his ethnic group or to be something like the scholarly first person plural: an appeal to consensus among a group of qualied experts. Neither is the case. Only once does Herodotus' "we" refer to the Greeks as a group; in virtually every other instance it must be interpreted as plural for singular. It refers, (...)
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  • Agamemnon 437: Chrysamoibos Ares, Athens and Empire.Geoffrey Bakewell - 2007 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:123-.
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  • "Chrysamoibos" Ares, Athens and Empire: "Agamemnon" 437.Geoffrey Bakewell - 2007 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:123-132.
    The chorus¿ depiction of Ares as a ¿gold-changer of bodies¿ and trader in precious metals underscores the increased intersection of finances and war in fifth-century Athens. The metaphor¿s details point to three contemporary developments (in addition to the patrios nomos allusion noted by Fraenkel): the increased conscription of citizens, the institution of pay for military service, and the payment of financial support for war orphans. And as leader of the Delian League, Athens itself resembled the war-god, establishing equivalents between men (...)
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  • Two Notes on the New Croesus Epigram From Thebes.Matthew Simonton - 2020 - Classical Quarterly 70 (1):10-15.
    In March 2005 a rescue excavation uncovered a spectacular new epigraphic find from Thebes. Now on display in the Archaeological Museum of Thebes, a column drum 0.41 m in height has inscribed on it two identical epigrams, one written vertically in Boeotian script and a second Ionian copy written horizontally on the other side. Nikolaos Papazarkadas published the editio princeps of the epigram in 2014, using both inscriptions to create a composite text. As Papazarkadas realized, the column drum, which has (...)
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  • Framing the Fox: Callimachus' Second Iamb and its Predecessors.Deborah Steiner - 2010 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 130:97-107.
    This article treats the figure of the fox that appears as one of the members of the embassy sent by the animals to Zeus in Callimachus' secondIamb. By exploring previous appearances of the fox in the poetic repertoire, I identify a series of Archaic and early Classical works that Callimachus uses by way of ‘intertexts’, and argue that the Hellenistic author draws on the animal's place within the interconnected iambic and fable traditions that inform his poem. Already visible in these (...)
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  • Relationality, Fidelity, and the Event in Sappho.Andres Matlock - 2020 - Classical Antiquity 39 (1):29-56.
    This article considers the conceptual significance of relationality in Sappho. It argues that Sappho's poetry reconstitutes systems of relation by making evident exceptions to their explanatory capacity. These exceptions can be profitably understood through the rubric of the “event.” Drawing in particular on the relational function of prepositions and Alain Badiou's philosophical work on the event, the article examines how “thinking prepositionally” alongside Sappho reveals both the relations that make up the situational world of her poetry as well as those (...)
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  • Journeys Into Slavery Along the Black Sea Coast, C. 550-450 BCE.Christopher Stedman Parmenter - 2020 - Classical Antiquity 39 (1):57-94.
    This article argues that descriptions of the Black Sea found in the Archaic poets, Herodotus, and later geographers were influenced by commercial itineraries circulated amongst Greek slave traders in the north. Drawing on an epigraphic corpus of twenty-three merchant letters from the region dating between c. 550 and 450 BCE, I contrast the travels of enslaved persons recorded in the documents with stylized descriptions found in literary accounts. This article finds that slaves took a variety of routes into—and out of—slavery, (...)
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  • The Use and Abuse of Training "Science" in Philostratus' Gymnasticus.Charles H. Stocking - 2016 - Classical Antiquity 35 (1):86-125.
    This article addresses how the sophistic-style analysis in Philostratus' Gymnasticus gives expression to the physical and social complexities involved in ancient athletic training. As a case in point, the article provides a close reading of Philostratus' description and criticism of the Tetrad, a four-day sequence of training, which resulted in the death of an Olympic athlete. To make physiological sense of the Tetrad, this method of training is compared to the role of periodization in ancient medicine and modern kinesiology. At (...)
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  • Democratic Ideology and The Poetics of Rape in Menandrian Comedy.Susan Lape - 2001 - Classical Antiquity 20 (1):79-119.
    Many of Menander's comedies are structured according to a rape plot pattern in which a young Athenian citizen usually rapes and impregnates a female citizen prior to the opening of the play. In most cases, the rape leads to a happy ending: the marriage of the rapist and victim. This casual treatment of rape is striking because in all other respects Menander's plays are not only scrupulously faithful to Athenian law, they also use Athenian legal and social norms as their (...)
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  • The Blood of the Commonwealth.David McNally - 2014 - Historical Materialism 22 (2):3-32.
    Insisting on the status of money as a creature of both the market and the state, this article challenges dualistic understandings of capitalist imperialism as entailing two fundamentally distinct logics, one capitalist, the other territorial. In opposition to the dual-logics position, the article argues for the distinctiveness of capitalist money in terms of a complex butunitarysocio-economic logic. The social dynamism of this logic involves the spatial-territorial extension of the domain of modern value relations, embodied in fully-capitalist money. Departing from the (...)
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  • Capitalismo y secularización.Fabián Ludueña Romandini - 2011 - Filosofia Unisinos 12 (2).
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  • Callimachus' Second "Iamb" and its Predecessors: Framing the Box.Deborah Steiner - 2010 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 130:97-107.
    This article treats the figure of the fox that appears as one of the members of the embassy sent by the animal s to Zeus in Callimachus' second ¡ambo By exploring previous appearances of the fox in the poetic repertoire, I identify a series of Archaic and early Classical works that Callimachus uses by way of 'intertexts', and argue that the Hellenistic author draws on the animal's place within the interconnected iambic and fable traditions that inform his poem. Already visible (...)
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  • Maidens, Fillies and the Death of Medusa on a Seventh-Century Pithos.Kathryn Topper - 2010 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 130:109-119.