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  1. Graduate Employability and the Principle of Potentiality: An Aspect of the Ethics of HRM. [REVIEW]Bogdan Costea, Kostas Amiridis & Norman Crump - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (1):25-36.
    The recruitment of the next generation of workers is of central concern to contemporary HRM. This paper focuses on university campuses as a major site of this process, and particularly as a new domain in which HRM's ethical claims are configured, in which it sets and answers a range of ethical questions as it outlines the 'ethos' of the ideal future worker. At the heart of this ethos lies what we call the 'principle of potentiality'. This principle is explored through (...)
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  • A New Framework for Understanding Inequalities Between Expatriates and Host Country Nationals.Victor Oltra, Jaime Bonache & Chris Brewster - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (2):291-310.
    An interdisciplinary theoretical framework is proposed for analysing justice in global working conditions. In addition to gender and race as popular criteria to identify disadvantaged groups in organizations, in multinational corporations (MNCs) local employees (i.e. host country nationals (HCNs) working in foreign subsidiaries) deserve special attention. Their working conditions are often substantially worse than those of expatriates (i.e. parent country nationals temporarily assigned to a foreign subsidiary). Although a number of reasons have been put forward to justify such inequalities—usually with (...)
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  • Ethical Pitfalls of Temporary Labour Migration: A Critical Review of Issues. [REVIEW]Zinovijus Ciupijus - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (S1):9-18.
    The article discusses a particularly contentious aspect of labour mobility—state sanctioned and controlled temporary labour migration. In contrast to forced migration, which always has had a recognizable ethical dimension in terms of the universal right to asylum, temporary labour migration has tended to be viewed as an exclusively economic and thus ethically neutral phenomenon. This article presents a diametrically opposite approach to temporary labour migration: it is argued that this form of labour mobility creates a plethora of ethical challenges to (...)
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  • Recognition, Reification, and Practices of Forgetting: Ethical Implications of Human Resource Management. [REVIEW]Gazi Islam - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (1):37-48.
    This article examines the ethical framing of employment in contemporary human resource management (HRM). Using Axel Honneth's theory of recognition and classical critical notions of reification, I contrast recognition and reifying stances on labor. The recognition approach embeds work in its emotive and social particularity, positively affirming the basic dignity of social actors. Reifying views, by contrast, exhibit a forgetfulness of recognition, removing action from its existential and social moorings, and imagining workers as bundles of discrete resources or capacities. After (...)
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  • Lord Acton and Employment Doctrines: Absolute Power and the Spread of At-Will Employment.James S. Bowman & Jonathan P. West - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (2):119-130.
    This study analyzes the at-will employment doctrine using a tool that encompasses the complementarity of results-based utilitarian ethics, rule-based duty ethics, and virtue-based character ethics. The paper begins with a discussion of the importance of the problem followed by its evolution and current status. After describing the method of analysis, the central section evaluates the employment at-will doctrine, and is informed by Lord Acton's dictum, "power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely." The conclusion explores the implications of the (...)
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  • Private Regulation and Trade Union Rights: Why Codes of Conduct Have Limited Impact on Trade Union Rights.Niklas Egels-Zandén & Jeroen Merk - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (3):1-13.
    Codes of conduct are the main tools to privately regulate worker rights in global value chains. Scholars have shown that while codes may improve outcome standards (such as occupational health and safety), they have had limited impact on process rights (such as freedom of association and collective bargaining). Scholars have, though, only provided vague or general explanations for this empirical finding. We address this shortcoming by providing a holistic and detailed explanation, and argue that codes, in their current form, have (...)
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  • Frontiers, Intersections and Engagements of Ethics and HRM.Gavin Jack, Michelle Greenwood & Jan Schapper - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (1):1-12.
    This essay, and the special issue it introduces, sets out to reignite ethical interrogations of the theory and practice of Human Resource Management (HRM). To cultivate greater levels of boundary-spanning debate about the ethics of HRM, we develop a framework of four tenors for scholarly work: the ethical-declarative, the ethical-subjunctive, the ethical-ethnographic, the ethical-systemic. Each of these tenors denotes particular grounds for ethical critique and encourages scholars to consider the subjects and objects of their enquiry, the disciplinary scope of their (...)
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  • Reframing the Business Case for Diversity: A Values and Virtues Perspective. [REVIEW]Hans Dijk, Marloes Engen & Jaap Paauwe - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (1):73-84.
    We provide an ethical evaluation of the debate on managing diversity within teams and organizations between equality and business case scholars. Our core assertion is that equality and business case perspectives on diversity from an ethical reading appear stuck as they are based on two different moral perspectives that are difficult to reconcile with each other. More specifically, we point out how the arguments of equality scholars correspond with moral reasoning grounded in deontology, whereas the foundations of the business case (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility and the Social Enterprise.Nelarine Cornelius, Mathew Todres, Shaheena Janjuha-Jivraj, Adrian Woods & James Wallace - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2):355-370.
    In this article, we contend that due to their size and emphasis upon addressing external social concerns, the corporate relationship between social enterprises, social awareness and action is more complex than whether or not these organisations engage in corporate social responsibility (CSR). This includes organisations that place less emphasis on CSR as well as other organisations that may be very proficient in CSR initiatives, but are less successful in recording practices. In this context, we identify a number of internal CSR (...)
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  • Contingent Work and Its Contradictions: Towards a Moral Economy Framework. [REVIEW]Sharon C. Bolton, Maeve Houlihan & Knut Laaser - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (1):121-132.
    This article proposes the lens of moral economy as a useful ethical framework through which to assess HRM practice, with a particular focus on the strategic use of contingent work ('non-standard' employment practices including temporary, agency and outsourced work). While contingent work practices have a variety of impetuses we focus here on their strategic use in the pursuit of economic and flexibility goals. A review of the contingent work literature conveys mixed messages about its outcomes for individuals, and more opaquely, (...)
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  • Mid-Management, Employee Engagement, and the Generation of Reliable Sustainable Corporate Social Responsibility.Lynn Godkin - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (1):15-28.
    This paper explains how middle managers might enlist ethically engaged employees into the production of reliable, sustainable CSR. An accompanying model illustrates how those managers can encounter employee engagement in CSR and channel their enthusiasm effectively. It presents factors scaffolding organizational support for employee engagement and how they relate to the intensity of that engagement. It introduces the importance of employee voice and illustrates how associated signals might be captured.
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  • Ethnicity, Equality and Voice: The Ethics and Politics of Representation and Participation in Relation to Equality and Ethnicity. [REVIEW]Nelarine Cornelius, Miguel Martinez Lucio, Fiona Wilson, Suzanne Gagnon, Robert MacKenzie & Eric Pezet - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (S1):1-7.
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  • The Struggles of the Interculturalists: Professional Ethical Identity and Early Stages of Codes of Ethics Development.Laurence Romani & Betina Szkudlarek - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (2):1-19.
    Ethicalisation processes that partake in the construction of a firm or a professional group’s ethical identity are often described as a relatively linear combination of several components, such as policies (starting with the development of a code of ethics), corporate practices, and leadership. Our study of a professional community dealing with the topics related to cultural diversity indicates a more reciprocal relationship between ethical identity and ethicalisation processes. We argue that a tangible form of ethical identity can pre-date the ethicalisation (...)
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  • Employees as Conduits for Effective Stakeholder Engagement: An Example From B Corporations.Anne-Laure P. Winkler, Jill A. Brown & David L. Finegold - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-24.
    Is there a link between how a firm manages its internal and external stakeholders? More specifically, are firms that give employees stock ownership and more say in running the enterprise more likely to engage with external stakeholders? This study seeks to answer these questions by elaborating on mechanisms that link employees to external stakeholders, such as the community, suppliers, and the environment. It tests these relationships using a sample of 347 private, mostly small-to-medium size firms, which completed a stakeholder impact (...)
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  • Responsibility Boundaries in Global Value Chains: Supplier Audit Prioritizations and Moral Disengagement Among Swedish Firms.Niklas Egels-Zandén - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (3):515-528.
    To address substandard working conditions in global value chains, companies have adopted private regulatory systems governing worker rights. Scholars agree that without onsite factory audits, this private regulation has limited impact at the point of production. Companies, however, audit only a subset of their suppliers, severely restricting their private regulatory attempts. Despite the significance of the placement of suppliers inside or outside firms’ “responsibility boundaries” and despite scholars’ having called for more research into how firms prioritize what suppliers to audit, (...)
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  • Firm–Employee Relationships From a Social Responsibility Perspective: Developments From Communist Thinking to Market Ideology in Romania. A Mass Media Story.Oana Apostol & Salme Näsi - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (3):1-15.
    Firm–employee relationships are dependent on the wider societal context and on the role business plays in society. Changes in institutional arrangements in society affect the perceived responsibilities of firms to their personnel. In this study, we examine mass media discussions about firm–employee relationships from a social responsibility perspective via a longitudinal study in Romanian society. Our analysis indicates how the expected responsibilities of firms towards employees have altered with the changing role of firms in society since the early 1990s. These (...)
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  • Sustainable Human Resource Management with Salience of Stakeholders: A Top Management Perspective.Maria Järlström, Essi Saru & Sinikka Vanhala - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (3):703-724.
    The present paper analyses how top managers construct the meaning of sustainable human resource management and its responsibility areas and how they identify and prioritize stakeholders in sustainable HRM. The empirical data were collected as part of the Finnish HR Barometer inquiry. A qualitative analysis reveals four dimensions of sustainable HRM: Justice and equality, transparent HR practices, profitability, and employee well-being. It also reveals four broader responsibility areas: Legal and ethical, managerial, social, and economic. Contrary to the prior green HRM (...)
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  • The Ethics of Engagement in an Age of Austerity: A Paradox Perspective.Helen Francis & Anne Keegan - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    Our contribution in this paper is to highlight the ethical implications of workforce engagement strategies in an age of austerity. Hard or instrumentalist approaches to workforce engagement create the potential for situations where engaged employees are expected to work ever longer and harder with negative outcomes for their well-being. Our study explores these issues in an investigation of the enactment of an engagement strategy within a UK Health charity, where managers and workers face paradoxical demands to raise service quality and (...)
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  • Gamification of Labor and the Charge of Exploitation.Tae Kim - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (1):27-39.
    Recently, business organizations have increasingly turned to a novel form of non-monetary incentives—that is, “gamification,” which refers to a motivation technique using video game elements, such as digital points, badges, and friendly competition in non-game contexts like workplaces. The introduction of gamification to the context of human resource management has immediately become embroiled in serious moral debates. Most notable is the accusation that using gamification as a motivation tool, employers exploit workers. This article offers an in-depth analysis of the moral (...)
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  • When Workplace Unionism in Global Value Chains Does Not Function Well: Exploring the Impediments.Céline Louche, Lotte Staelens & Marijke D’Haese - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-20.
    Improving working conditions at the bottom of global value chains has become a central issue in our global economy. In this battle, trade unionism has been presented as a way for workers to make their voices heard. Therefore, it is strongly promoted by most social standards. However, establishing a well-functioning trade union is not as obvious as it may seem. Using a comparative case study approach, we examine impediments to farm-level unionism in the cut flower industry in Ethiopia. For this (...)
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  • The Assessment of Individual Moral Goodness.B. Chiu Raymond & D. Hackett Rick - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (1):31-46.
    In a field dominated by research on moral prescription and moral prediction, there is poor understanding of the place of moral perceptions in organizations alongside philosophical ethics and causal models of ethical outcomes. As leadership failures continue to plague organizational health and firms recognize the wide-ranging impact of subjective bias, scholars and practitioners need a renewed frame of reference from which to reconceptualize their current understanding of ethics as perceived in individuals. Based on an assessment and selection perspective from the (...)
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  • Corporate Social Reporting in the European Context and Human Resource Disclosures: An Analysis of Finnish Companies.Taru Vuontisjärvi - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 69 (4):331-354.
    This paper explores by means of content analysis the extent to which the Finnish biggest companies have adapted socially responsible reporting practices. The research focuses on Human Resource (HR) reporting and covers corporate annual reports. The criteria has been set on the basis of the analysis of the documents published at the European level in the context of corporate social responsibility (CSR), paying special attention to the European Council appeal on CSR in March 2000. As CSR is a relatively new (...)
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  • Socioemotional Wealth and Corporate Social Responsibility: A Critical Analysis.Piotr Zientara - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 144 (1):185-199.
    This theoretical paper is offered in the spirit of advancing the debate on the socioemotional wealth construct and its impact on how family firms conceptualize and practise corporate social responsibility. The study builds on Kellermanns et al.’s :1175–1182, 2012) claim that the SEW dimensions can be positively and negatively valenced as well as makes a distinction between the selective and instrumental approach to CSR and the holistic and normative one. Drawing on these considerations, it provides a theoretical underpinning in favour (...)
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  • Ethics and HRM Education.Harry J. Van Buren & Michelle Greenwood - 2013 - Journal of Academic Ethics 11 (1):1-15.
    Human resource management (HRM) education has tended to focus on specific functions and tasks within organizations, such as compensation, staffing, and evaluation. This task orientation within HRM education fails to account for the bigger questions facing human resource management and employment relationships, questions which address the roles and responsibilities of the HR function and HR practitioners. An educational focus on HRM that does not explicitly address larger ethical questions fails to equip students to address stakeholder concerns about how employees are (...)
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  • The Ethics of Talent Management.Stephen Swailes - 2013 - Business Ethics 22 (1):32-46.
    Organisational approaches to talent management are often concerned with the ways that a small proportion of relatively high-performing employees are identified and managed in relation to the majority. Despite a growing literature on talent management, no papers have provided any guidance on how to evaluate it from an ethical standpoint. After considering what is meant by talent, this paper considers the ethical issues that arise from the operation of talent management programmes. These considerations are then used to create a framework (...)
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  • Ethics of Resistance in Organisations: A Conceptual Proposal.Ozan Nadir Alakavuklar & Fahreen Alamgir - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 149 (1):31-43.
    This study suggests a conceptual proposal to analyse the ethics of resistance in organisations, drawing on Foucault’s practising self as a refusal and Schaffer’s ethics of freedom in opposition to the legitimacy of managerial control and the ethics of compliance. We argue that ethics is already part of such politics in the form of ethico-politics on the basis of participation in political action in organisations. Hence, the practising self as resistance in the face of the status quo of managerial power (...)
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  • Smoking as a Job Killer: Reactions to Smokers in Personnel Selection.Nicolas Roulin & Namita Bhatnagar - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 149 (4):959-972.
    Decades of tobacco control initiatives have turned public opinion against cigarette smoking. Smokers, once considered glamorous, are now stigmatized in domains including the workplace. Extant literature lacks scrutiny of smoker stigmatization and devaluation within the job selection process, and mechanisms that lead to such outcomes. Using an experimental design, we empirically examine initial reactions to job applicants’ smoking behaviors within two samples. We show that initial impressions are significantly worse when job applicants smoke versus do not in a store-based context. (...)
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  • Psychology and Business Ethics: A Multi-Level Research Agenda.Gazi Islam - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-13.
    Arguing that psychology and business ethics are best brought together through a multi-level, broad-based agenda, this essay articulates a vision of psychology and business ethics to frame a future research agenda. The essay draws upon work published in JBE, but also identifies gaps where published research is needed, to build upon psychological conceptions of business ethics. Psychological concepts, notably, are not restricted to phenomena “in the head”, but are discussed at the intra-psychic, relational, and contextual levels of analysis. On the (...)
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  • Codes of Ethics in the Light of Fairness and Harm.Dan Munter - 2013 - Business Ethics: A European Review 22 (2):174-188.
    Nine codes of ethics from companies in the Swedish financial sector were subjected to a content analysis to determine how they address and treat employees. The codes say a great deal about employee conduct and misconduct but next to nothing about employee rights, their rightful expectations or their value to the firm. The normative analysis – echoing some of the value-based HRM literature – draws on the foundational values of respect, equality, reciprocity and care. The analysis shows that most of (...)
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  • Socializing Ethical Behavior of Foreign Employees in Multinational Corporations.Milorad M. Novicevic, M. Ronald Buckley, Michael G. Harvey, Jonathon R. B. Halbesleben & Susan Des Rosiers - 2003 - Business Ethics: A European Review 12 (3):298-307.
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  • MNCs, Worker Identity and the Human Rights Gap for Local Managers.Carla C. J. M. Millar & Chong Ju Choi - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (S1):55-60.
    This article analyses MNCs, worker identity and the ethical vulnerability caused by over-reliance on expatriate managers and under-reliance on local managers, who are often undervalued. It is argued that MNCs not only need but also have an obligation to assess local managers’ knowledge and contributions as having not only operational and market values, but also institutional value. Local managers both give access to and form part of local social capital and the treatment they receive is an element in the CSR (...)
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  • Contextualizing Voice and Stakeholders: Researching Employment Relations, Immigration and Trade Unions. [REVIEW]Martínez Lucio Miguel & Connolly Heather - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (S1):19-29.
    This article aims to outline some of the ways in which issues of migration and employment relations have been studied in the European context, cross referencing recent interventions in the USA. The argument is a discussion of some of the different dimensions of migration and the way debates within Industrial Relations have been shaped. More specifically, the article will look at the way trade unions have made the ethical turn towards questions of migration and equality. The article will observe the (...)
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  • Building Sustainable Values in Organizations with the Support of Human Resource Management: Evidence From One Firm Considered as the ‘Best Place to Work’ in Brazil.de Souza Freitas Wesley Ricardo, Jabbour Charbel José Chiappetta, Mangili Leandro Luis, Filho Walter Leal & de Oliveira Jorge Henrique Caldeira - 2012 - Journal of Human Values 18 (2):147-159.
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  • Socializing Ethical Behavior of Foreign Employees in Multinational Corporations.Milorad M. Novicevic, M. Ronald Buckley, Michael G. Harvey, Jonathon R. B. Halbesleben & Susan Des Rosiers - 2003 - Business Ethics 12 (3):298–307.
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  • The Impact of Human Resource Management Practices and Corporate Sustainability on Organizational Ethical Climates: An Employee Perspective. [REVIEW]M. Guerci, Giovanni Radaelli, Elena Siletti, Stefano Cirella & A. B. Rami Shani - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (2):1-18.
    The increasing challenges faced by organizations have led to numerous studies examining human resource management (HRM) practices, organizational ethical climates and sustainability. Despite this, little has been done to explore the possible relationships between these three topics. This study, based on a probabilistic sample of 6,000 employees from six European countries, analyses how HRM practices with the aim of developing organizational ethics influence the benevolent, principled and egoistic ethical climates that exist within organizations, while also investigating the possible moderating role (...)
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  • Social Responsibility, Quality of Work Life and Motivation to Contribute in the Nigerian Society.Constantine Imafidon Tongo - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (2):1-15.
    Presently, the social responsibility literature is replete with the diverse ways in which work organizations and the regulatory nation states in which they are domiciled can improve the quality of their workers’ lives. But do workers themselves become motivated to contribute (i.e., give back) to society when they experience a work life of better quality than their peers? Specifically, which sectors of society do such workers contribute to? Through a questionnaire that was administered to a cross section of workers in (...)
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  • Industrial Relations, Ethics and Conscience.Chris Provis - 2006 - Business Ethics 15 (1):64–75.
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  • The Ethics of Talent Management.Stephen Swailes - 2013 - Business Ethics: A European Review 22 (1):32-46.
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  • Industrial Relations, Ethics and Conscience.Chris Provis - 2006 - Business Ethics: A European Review 15 (1):64-75.
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  • Agonism and the Possibilities of Ethics for HRM.Carl Rhodes & Geraint Harvey - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (1):49-59.
    This paper provides a critique and re-evaluation of the way that ethics is understood and promoted within mainstream Human Resource Management (HRM) discourse. We argue that the ethics located within this discourse focuses on bolstering the relevance of HRM as a key contributor to organizational strategy, enhancing an organization's sense of moral legitimacy and augmenting organizational control over employee behaviour and subjectivity. We question this discourse in that it subordinates the ethics of the employment relationship to managerial prerogative. In response, (...)
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  • The Employee as 'Dish of the Day': The Ethics of the Consuming/Consumed Self in Human Resource Management. [REVIEW]Karen Dale - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (1):13-24.
    This article examines the ethical implications of the growing integration of consumption into the heart of the employment relationship. Human resource management (HRM) practices increasingly draw upon the values and practices of consumption, constructing employees as the 'consumers' of 'cafeteria-style' benefits and development opportunities. However, at the same time employees are expected to market themselves as items to be consumed on a corporate menu. In relation to this simultaneous position of consumer/consumed, the employee is expected to actively engage in the (...)
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  • Towards an Ethical Research Agenda for International HRM: The Possibilities of a Plural Cosmopolitan Framework. [REVIEW]Maddy Janssens & Chris Steyaert - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (1):61-72.
    In this conceptual paper, we aim to develop a much needed ethical research agenda for international Human Resource Management (HRM), given that the changing geopolitical dynamics interrogate the political role of multinational companies and the ethical stance they take in their HRM practices. To theoretically ground this agenda, we turn to cosmopolitanism and distinguish three main perspectives—political, cultural, and social—each of which implies a different understanding of the self–other relation in the context of the global world. We translate the core (...)
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  • Human Resource Management in a Compartmentalized World: Whither Moral Agency? [REVIEW]Tracy Wilcox - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (1):85-96.
    This article examines the potential for moral agency in human resource management practice. It draws on an ethnographic study of human resource managers in a global organization to provide a theorized account of situated moral agency. This account suggests that within contemporary organizations, institutional structures—particularly the structures of Anglo-American market capitalism— threaten and constrain the capacity of HR managers to exercise moral agency and hence engage in ethical behaviour. The contextualized explanation of HR management action directly addresses the question of (...)
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  • Ethical Analyses of HRM: A Review and Research Agenda. [REVIEW]Michelle Greenwood - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (2):355-366.
    The very idea of human resource management raises ethical considerations: What does it mean to us as humans for human beings to be managed as resources? Intriguingly, the field of ethics and HRM remains underdeveloped. Current approaches to HRM fail to place ethical considerations as their central warrant. This article, building on Greenwood (J Bus Ethics 36(3):261–279, 2002), argues for a deeper analysis of ethical issues in HRM, indeed for a differentiated ethical perspective of HRM that sets normative deliberations as (...)
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