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  1. Considerations of Conscience.Bryan Pilkington - 2021 - HEC Forum 33 (3):165-174.
    The proper role of conscience in healthcare continues to be a topic of deep interest for bioethicists, healthcare professionals, and health policy experts. This issue of HEC Forum brings together a collection of articles about features of these ongoing discussions of conscience, advancing the conversations about conscience in healthcare from a variety of perspectives and on a variety of fronts. Some articles in this issue take up particularly challenging cases of conscientious objection in practice, such as Fleming, Frith, and Ramsayer’s (...)
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  • Conscience Dissenters and Disagreement: Professions are Only as Good as Their Practitioners.Bryan C. Pilkington - 2021 - HEC Forum 33 (3):233-245.
    In this paper, I consider the role of conscience in medical practice. If the conscientious practice of individual practitioners cannot be defended or is incoherent or unreasonable on its own merits, then there is little reason to support conscience protection and to argue about its place in the current medical landscape. If this is the case, conscience protection should be abandoned. To the contrary, I argue that conscience protection should not be abandoned. My argument takes the form of an analysis (...)
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  • Remember Evil: Remaining Assumptions In Autonomy-Based Accounts Of Conscience Protection.Bryan C. Pilkington - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (4):483-488.
    Discussions of the proper role of conscience and practitioner judgement within medicine have increased of late, and with good reason. The cost of allowing practitioners the space to exercise their best judgement and act according to their conscience is significant. Misuse of such protections carve out societal space in which abuse, discrimination, abandonment of patients, and simple malpractice might occur. These concerns are offered amid a backdrop of increased societal polarization and are about a profession which has historically fought for (...)
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  • In Defence of Forgetting Evil: A Reply to Pilkington on Conscientious Objection.Jake Greenblum & T. J. Kasperbauer - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):189-191.
    In a recent article for this journal, Bryan Pilkington makes a number of critical observations about one of our arguments for non-traditional medical conscientious objectors’ duty to refer. Non-traditional conscientious objectors are those professionals who object to indirectly performing actions—like, say, referring to a physician who will perform an abortion. In our response here, we discuss his central objection and clarify our position on the role of value conflicts in non-traditional conscientious objection.
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  • Facing COVID-19 Between Sensory and Psychoemotional Stress, and Instrumental Deprivation: A Qualitative Study of Unmanageable Critical Incidents With Doctors and Nurses in Two Hospitals in Northern Italy.Ines Testoni, Chiara Franco, Enrica Gallo Stampino, Erika Iacona, Robert Crupi & Claudio Pagano - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Background: The COVID-19 pandemic severely strained the already unprepared Italian healthcare system. This had repercussions on healthcare workers, stemming, in particular, from a lack of clear guidelines, adequate protective equipment, and professional preparedness. Such conditions were especially prevalent in Northern Italy.Objectives: This study aimed to examine COVID-19-related professional and psychoemotional stress among nurses and doctors in two hospitals in Northern Italy, along with the worst critical incidents affecting healthcare personnel. A parallel objective was to elicit healthcare professionals' opinions about what (...)
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  • Remember Evil: Remaining Assumptions In Autonomy-Based Accounts Of Conscience Protection.Bryan C. Pilkington - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (4):483-488.
    Discussions of the proper role of conscience and practitioner judgement within medicine have increased of late, and with good reason. The cost of allowing practitioners the space to exercise their best judgement and act according to their conscience is significant. Misuse of such protections carve out societal space in which abuse, discrimination, abandonment of patients, and simple malpractice might occur. These concerns are offered amid a backdrop of increased societal polarization and are about a profession which has historically fought for (...)
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  • Remember Evil: Remaining Assumptions In Autonomy-Based Accounts Of Conscience Protection.Bryan C. Pilkington - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (4):483-488.
    Discussions of the proper role of conscience and practitioner judgement within medicine have increased of late, and with good reason. The cost of allowing practitioners the space to exercise their best judgement and act according to their conscience is significant. Misuse of such protections carve out societal space in which abuse, discrimination, abandonment of patients, and simple malpractice might occur. These concerns are offered amid a backdrop of increased societal polarization and are about a profession which has historically fought for (...)
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  • Responding to Religious Patients: Why Physicians Have No Business Doing Theology.Jake Greenblum & Ryan K. Hubbard - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (11):705-710.
    A survey of the recent literature suggests that physicians should engage religious patients on religious grounds when the patient cites religious considerations for a medical decision. We offer two arguments that physicians ought to avoid engaging patients in this manner. The first is the Public Reason Argument. We explain why physicians are relevantly akin to public officials. This suggests that it is not the physician’s proper role to engage in religious deliberation. This is because the public character of a physician’s (...)
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  • Embedded Journalists or Empirical Critics? The Nature of The “Gaze” in Bioethics.Michael A. Ashby & Bronwen Morrell - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (3):305-307.
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