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Kierkegaard and Kant: The Hidden Debt

State University of New York Press (1992)

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  1. Kant and Kierkegaard on Freedom and Evil.Alison Assiter - 2013 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 72:275-296.
    Kant and Kierkegaard are two philosophers who are not usually bracketed together. Yet, for one commentator, Ronald Green, in his book Kierkegaard and Kant: The Hidden Debt , a deep similarity between them is seen in the centrality both accord to the notion of freedom. Kierkegaard, for example, in one of his Journal entries, expresses a ‘passion’ for human freedom. Freedom is for Kierkegaard also linked to a paradox that lies at the heart of thought. In Philosophical Fragment Kierkegaard writes (...)
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  • Kierkegaard’s Regulative Sacrifice: A Post-Kantian Reading of Fear and Trembling.Paolo Diego Bubbio - 2012 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 20 (5):691-723.
    Abstract The present paper suggests to consider Kierkegaard?s use of Abraham?s story in Fear and Trembling in regulative terms, that is, to consider it as a model ? not for our moral behaviour but rather for our religious behaviour. To do so, I first rely on recent literature to argue that Kierkegaard should be regarded as a distinctively post-Kantian philosopher: namely, a philosopher who goes beyond Kant in a way that is nevertheless true to the spirit of Kant?s original critical (...)
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  • Original Sin and Radical Evil: Kierkegaard and Kant.Roe Fremstedal - 2012 - Kantian Review 17 (2):197-225.
    By comparing the theories of evil found in Kant and Kierkegaard, this article aims to shed new light on Kierkegaard, as well as on the historical and conceptual relations between the two philosophers. The author shows that there is considerable overlap between Kant's doctrine of radical evil and Kierkegaard's views on guilt and sin and argues that Kierkegaard approved of the doctrine of radical evil. Although Kierkegaard's distinction between guilt and sin breaks radically with Kant, there are more Kantian elements (...)
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  • Eudaimonia and Agape in Macintyre and Kierkegaard's Works of Love.Matthew D. Mendham - 2007 - Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (4):591-625.
    This essay explores connections and divergences between Alasdair MacIntyre's eudaimonistic ethic and Søren Kierkegaard's agapeistic ethic--perhaps the greatest proponents of these ethical paradigms from the past two centuries. The purpose of the work is threefold. First, to demonstrate an impressive amount of convergence and complementarity in their approaches to the transcendent grounds of an ethic of flourishing, the rigors necessary for a proper self-love, and the other-directed nature of proper social relations. Second, given the inapplicability of common dichotomies, to pinpoint (...)
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  • The Concept of the Highest Good in Kierkegaard and Kant.Roe Fremstedal - 2011 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 69 (3):155-171.
    This article tries to make sense of the concept of the highest good (eternal bliss) in Søren Kierkegaard by comparing it to the analysis of the highest good found in Immanuel Kant. The comparison with Kant’s more systematic analysis helps us clarify the meaning and importance of the concept in Kierkegaard as well as to shed new light on the conceptual relation between Kant and Kierkegaard. The article argues that the concept of the highest good is of systematic importance in (...)
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  • Kierkegaard's Double Movement of Faith and Kant's Moral Faith.Roe Fremstedal - 2012 - Religious Studies 48 (2):199 - 220.
    The present article deals with religious faith by comparing the so-called double movement of faith in Kierkegaard to Kant's moral faith. Kierkegaard's double movement of faith and Kant's moral faith can be seen as providing different accounts of religious faith, as well as involving different solutions to the problem of realizing the highest good. The double movement of faith in Fear and Trembling provides an account of the structure of faith that helps us make sense of what Kierkegaard means by (...)
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  • The Moral Argument for the Existence of God and Immortality.Roe Fremstedal - 2013 - Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (1):50-78.
    This essay tries to show that there exist several passages where Kierkegaard (and his pseudonyms) sketches an argument for the existence of God and immortality that is remarkably similar to Kant's so-called moral argument for the existence of God and immortality. In particular, Kierkegaard appears to follow Kant's moral argument both when it comes to the form and content of the argument as well as some of its terminology. The essay concludes that several passages in Kierkegaard overlap significantly with Kant's (...)
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  • Kierkegaard on the Metaphysics of Hope.Roe Fremstedal - 2012 - Heythrop Journal 53 (1):51-60.
  • The Paralyzing Instant.Jonathan Malesic - 2013 - Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (2):209-232.
    Kierkegaard in Fear and Trembling presents a reductio ad absurdum regarding the time-spans subject to moral evaluation. The text's classic dilemma depends on assuming that we only evaluate discrete, contextless instants. The pseudonymous author constantly seeks the single instant or moral “photograph” that indicates Abraham's status. Doing so, however, extracts scripture's moral legislation out from narrative, resulting in theological paralysis and thereby requiring an alternative temporal vocabulary for evaluating Abraham. Fear and Trembling contains an under-explored alternative that sets Abraham within (...)
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  • After MacIntyre.David Humbert - 2014 - Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (2):310-333.
    In his influential book After Virtue, Alasdair MacIntyre identifies Kierkegaard's view of ethics with that of Kant. Both Kant and Kierkegaard, according to MacIntyre, accept the modern paradigm of moral activity for which freedom of the will is the ultimate basis. Ronald M. Green, in Kierkegaard and Kant: The Hidden Debt, accepts and deepens this alignment between the two thinkers. Green argues that Kierkegaard deliberately obscured his debt to Kant by a systematic “misattribution” of his ideas to other thinkers, and (...)
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  • Kant and Kierkegaard on Inwardness and Moral Luck.Jennifer Ryan Lockhart - 2015 - Philosophical Investigations 38 (3):251-275.
    The traditional understanding of Kant and Kierkegaard is that their views on the good will and inwardness, respectively, commit them to denying moral luck in an attempt to isolate an omnipotent moral subject from involvement with the external world. This leaves them vulnerable to the criticism that their ethical thought unrealistically insulates morality from anything that happens in the world. On the interpretation offered here, inwardness and the good will are not contrasted with worldly happenings, but are instead a matter (...)
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  • Grace and Christianity's Requirement: Moral Striving in Kierkegaard's Judge for Yourself!Jeffrey Morgan - 2014 - Heythrop Journal 55 (5):916-926.
    In his later work Judge for Yourself, Kierkegaard presents a view of the Christian life that appears to counter several recent interpretations which situate Kierkegaard within a classical Protestant account of justification and sanctification. I introduce briefly these interpretations and then turn to a reading of Judge for Yourself, showing that Kierkegaard offers an account of grace and moral striving which resists these interpretations. He resists them, yet he presents a Christianity that both rejects works-righteousness and graciously embraces those who (...)
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