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  1. Christian Realism and Augustinian Liberalism.Peter Iver Kaufman - 2010 - Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (4):699-724.
    ABSTRACTAugustine's ontology, ecclesiology, and soteriology have recently been mined to help Christian realists and liberals respond to the problems that pluralism and conflict create for democratic societies. The results challenge those secularists who object to the late antique prelate's “moralizing” as well as others who insist that “public reason”—not religious traditions—makes for more meaningful political conversations and for collaboration “across differences.” But the results also raise the question whether Augustine would have gone along with the realists and liberals he has (...)
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  • The Meaning of Death and the Goal of Medicine: An Augustinian and Barthian Reassessment.Autumn Alcott Ridenour - 2017 - Christian Bioethics 23 (1):60-76.
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  • Gratuity, Embodiment, and Reciprocity.Sandra Sullivan-Dunbar - 2013 - Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (2):254-279.
    Protestant Christian ethicist Timothy Jackson and secular feminist philosopher Eva Feder Kittay each explore the relationship between love or care and justice through the lens of human dependency. Jackson sharply prioritizes agape over justice, whereas Kittay articulates a more complex and integrated understanding of the relationship of care and distributive justice. An account of Christian love and its relation to justice must account for the gratuity, mutuality, and reciprocity that pervade human existence. Such an account must integrate provision for another's (...)
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  • Hauerwas Among the Virtues.Jennifer A. Herdt - 2012 - Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (2):202-227.
    Despite the fact that Stanley Hauerwas has not taken up many of the topics normally associated with virtue ethics, has explicitly distanced himself from the enterprise known as “virtue ethics,” and throughout his career has preferred other categories of analysis, ranging from character and agency to practices and liturgy, it is nevertheless clear that his work has had a deep and transformative impact on the recovery of virtue within Christian ethics, and that this impact has largely to do with the (...)
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  • Formation, Grace, and Pneumatology: Or, Where's the Spirit in Gregory's Augustine?James K. A. Smith - 2011 - Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (3):556-569.
    Eric Gregory's Politics and the Order of Love takes up an audacious project: enlisting Saint Augustine in order to "help imagine a better liberalism." This article first provides a summary of Gregory's argument, focusing on his emphasis on love as a "motivation" for neighborly care, and hence democratic participation. This involves tracing the theme of motivation in the book, which is tied to his articulation of liberal perfectionism and an emphasis on civic virtue. In conclusion I raise the question of (...)
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  • Wolterstorff on Love and Justice. [REVIEW]Joseph Clair - 2013 - Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (1):138-167.
    In Justice in Love, Nicholas Wolterstorff argues for a unique ethical orientation called “care-agapism.” He offers it as an alternative to theories of benevolence-agapism found in Christian ethics on the one hand and to the philosophical orientations of egoism, utilitarianism, and eudaimonism on the other. The purported uniqueness and superiority of his theory lies in its ability to account for the conceptual compatibility of love and justice while also positively incorporating self-love. Yet in attempting to articulate a “bestowed worth” account (...)
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  • Remembering How and What I Think: A Response to the Jre Articles on Hauerwas.Stanley Hauerwas - 2012 - Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (2):296-306.
    In this essay Stanley Hauerwas reflects on his life's work by responding to the critical contributions found in the essays of this volume. Rather than trying to defend a “position,” Hauerwas takes this opportunity to offer further insight into how he sees his work to be driven by theology, insofar as his ethical reflection cannot be extricated from Christological considerations. It is this Christological center that allows him to avoid making a false separation between the person and work of Jesus (...)
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  • Porters to Heaven.Kate Ward - 2014 - Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (2):216-242.
    This essay presents Augustine as a rich ethical resource on issues of wealth and poverty. Contrary to prevalent views that he had little to say on issues of economic justice, Augustine decries wealth as morally dangerous, promotes the agency of the poor in advocating for themselves with the wealthy, and supports distributive justice. Augustine envisions an interdependent Christian community where the wealthy not only help the poor, but rely on the poor to help them achieve salvation by “bearing their goods (...)
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