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  1. Is "Why Be Moral?" A Pseudo-Question?: Hospers and Thornton on the Amoralist's Challenge.John J. Tilley - 2006 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 87 (4):549-66.
    Many arguments have been advanced for the view that "Why be moral?" is a pseudo-question. In this paper I address one of the most widely known and influential of them, one that comes from John Hospers and J. C. Thornton. I do so partly because, strangely, an important phase of that argument has escaped close attention. It warrants such attention because, firstly, not only is it important to the argument in which it appears, it is important in wider respects. For (...)
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  • Methodological Invention as a Constructive Project: Exploring the Production of Ethical Knowledge Through the Interaction of Discursive Logics.Elizabeth M. Bucar - 2008 - Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (3):355-373.
    This article reflects one scholar's attempt to locate herself within emerging ethical methodologies given a specific concern with cross-cultural women's moral praxis. The field of comparative ethics's debt to past debates over methodology is considered through a typology of three waves of methodological invention. The article goes on to describe a specific research focus on U.S. Catholic and Iranian Shii women that initiated a search for a distinct method. This method of comparative ethics, which focuses on the production of ethical (...)
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  • Religion, Morality and Education ‐Constitutionally Incongruent?Brian Gates - 1990 - Journal of Moral Education 19 (3):147-158.
    Abstract Religion is a disputed area in relation to both morality and politics. Similarly, while some argue that moral education should be based on a preferred religious reference point, others reject this as categorically wrong. Both these views are false, because based on a selective perception of the universal human context, a tendency also evident in other spheres. Typically, there are three constitutional responses to religion ? established singularity, secular pluralism and selective consensus ? each with its own consequences for (...)
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  • The Religious Nature of Practical Reason: A Way Into the Debate. [REVIEW]David A. Krueger - 1986 - Journal of Business Ethics 5 (6):511 - 519.
    This paper criticizes De George's portrayal of theological ethics and its purported inability to make a distinctive contribution to business ethics with the following theses. (1) De George's understanding of the nature of theological ethics is faulty. Consequently his typology of the field is not an adequate description of the range of prevailing approaches. (2) A constructive proposal for religious ethics is offered which takes as its starting points (a) an aspect of human experience (self-transcendence) and (b) the human capacity (...)
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  • Anthropos and Ethics Categories of Inquiry and Procedures of Comparison.Thomas A. Lewis, Jonathan Wyn Schofer, Aaron Stalnaker & Mark A. Berkson - 2005 - Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):177-185.
    Building on influential work in virtue ethics, this collection of essays examines the categories of self, person, and anthropology as foci for comparative analysis. The papers unite reflections on theory and method with descriptive work that addresses thinkers from the modern West, Christian and Jewish Late Antiquity, early China, and other settings. The introduction sets out central methodological issues that are subsequently taken up in each essay, including the origin of the categories through which comparison proceeds, the status of these (...)
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  • Comparative Religious Ethics and the Problem of “Human Nature”.Aaron Stalnaker - 2005 - Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):187-224.
    Comparative religious ethics is a complicated scholarly endeavor, striving to harmonize intellectual goals that are frequently conceived as quite different, or even intrinsically opposed. Against commonly voiced suspicions of comparative work, this essay argues that descriptive, comparative, and normative interests may support rather than conflict with each other, depending on the comparison in question, and how it is pursued. On the basis of a brief comparison of the early Christian Augustine of Hippo and the early Confucians Mencius and Xunzi on (...)
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  • Morality and Religion.Tim Mawson - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (6):1033-1043.
    In this article, I look at recent developments in the field of the Philosophy of the relationship between morality, understood in a realist manner, and the primary object of religious belief in the monotheistic religions, God. Some contemporary solutions to the Euthyphro dilemma and versions of moral arguments for the existence of God are discussed.
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  • FRAMES OF COMPARISON Anthropology and Inheriting Traditional Practices.Thomas A. Lewis - 2005 - Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):225-253.
    This essay seeks to develop and illustrate an approach to comparison based on "ad hoc" frames. A frame is defined by a question, to which dif- ferent thinkers can be seen as offering complementary and/or competing responses. Pursuing a middle ground between universalist conceptions of comparison and particularist rejections of comparison, this approach brings various positions into dialogue in a manner that is not inherently totalizing. The article draws extensively on Hegel's philosophy of religion to articulate this approach to comparison (...)
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  • Judging Others: History, Ethics, and the Purposes of Comparison.Aaron Stalnaker - 2008 - Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (3):425-444.
    The most interesting and perilous issue at present in comparative religious ethics is comparative ethical judgment—when and how to judge others, if at all. There are understandable historical and conceptual reasons for the current tendency to prefer descriptive over normative work in comparative religious ethics. However, judging those we study is inescapable—it can be suppressed or marginalized but not eliminated. Therefore, the real question is how to judge others (and ourselves) well, not whether to judge. Instead of bringing supposedly universal (...)
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  • The Present State of the Comparative Study of Religious Ethics: An Update.John Kelsay - 2012 - Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (4):583-602.
    A survey of developments over the last forty years suggests that little progress has been made in the development of comparative religious ethics as a discipline. While authors working in this field have produced a number of interesting works, the field lacks structure, including an agreement on the basic purpose, terms, and approaches by which contributions may be evaluated as better or worse. I provide an account of this history, suggesting that a way forward will involve marrying ethicists' interest in (...)
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