Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Neuroenhancing Public Health.David Shaw - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics (6):2012-101300.
    One of the most fascinating issues in the emerging field of neuroethics is pharmaceutical cognitive enhancement (CE). The three main ethical concerns around CE were identified in a Nature commentary in 2008 as safety, coercion and fairness; debate has largely focused on the potential to help those who are cognitively disabled, and on the issue of “cosmetic neurology”, where people enhance not because of a medical need, but because they want to (as many as 25% of American students already use (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Neuroenhancing Public Health.David Shaw - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (6):389-391.
    One of the most fascinating issues in the emerging field of neuroethics is pharmaceutical cognitive enhancement. The three main ethical concerns around CE were identified in a Nature commentary in 2008 as safety, coercion and fairness; debate has largely focused on the potential to help those who are cognitively disabled, and on the issue of ‘cosmetic neurology’, where people enhance not because of a medical need, but because they want to. However, the potential for CE to improve public health has (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Neuroenhancers, Addiction and Research Ethics.David Martin Shaw - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (10):605-608.
    In their recent paper in this journal, Heinz and colleagues accuse proponents of cognitive enhancement of making two unjustified assumptions. The first of these is the assumption that neuroenhancing drugs will be safe; the second is that research into cognitive enhancement does not pose particular ethical problems. Heinz and colleagues argue that both these assumptions are false. Here, I argue that these assumptions are in fact correct, and that Heinz and colleagues themselves make several assumptions that undermine their argument. Neuroenhancement (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Neurotechnological Cerebral Subject: Persistence of Implicit and Explicit Gender Norms in a Network of Change. [REVIEW]Sigrid Schmitz - 2011 - Neuroethics 5 (3):261-274.
    Abstract Under the realm of neurocultures the concept of the cerebral subject emerges as the central category to define the self, socio-cultural interaction and behaviour. The brain is the reference for explaining cognitive processes and behaviour but at the same time the plastic brain is situated in current paradigms of (self)optimization on the market of meritocracy by means of neurotechnologies. This paper explores whether neurotechnological apparatuses may—due to their hybridity and malleability—bear potentials for a change in gender based attributions that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Future of Psychopharmacological Enhancements: Expectations and Policies.Maartje Schermer, Ineke Bolt, Reinoud de Jongh & Berend Olivier - 2009 - Neuroethics 2 (2):75-87.
    The hopes and fears expressed in the debate on human enhancement are not always based on a realistic assessment of the expected possibilities. Discussions about extreme scenarios may at times obscure the ethical and policy issues that are relevant today. This paper aims to contribute to an adequate and ethically sound societal response to actual current developments. After a brief outline of the ethical debate concerning neuro-enhancement, it describes the current state of the art in psychopharmacological science and current uses (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • Associations Between the Big Five Personality Traits and the Non-Medical Use of Prescription Drugs for Cognitive Enhancement.Sebastian Sattler & Reinhard Schunck - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Deep Brain Stimulation as a Probative Biology: Scientific Inquiry and the Mosaic Device.Joseph J. Fins - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 3 (1):4-8.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Remaking Homo: Ethical Issues on Future Human Enhancement.Arthur Saniotis - 2013 - Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 13 (1):15-21.
  • A Comparison of Attitudes Toward Pharmacological Treatment Versus Enhancement Under Competitive and Noncompetitive Conditions.Jeffrey M. Rudski - 2014 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 5 (2):80-90.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Unintended Benefits Arising From Cell-Based Interventions for Neurological Conditions.Peter B. Reiner - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (5):51-52.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • ‘Cosmetic Neurology’ and the Moral Complicity Argument.A. Ravelingien, J. Braeckman, L. Crevits, D. De Ridder & E. Mortier - 2009 - Neuroethics 2 (3):151-162.
    Over the past decades, mood enhancement effects of various drugs and neuromodulation technologies have been proclaimed. If one day highly effective methods for significantly altering and elevating one’s mood are available, it is conceivable that the demand for them will be considerable. One urgent concern will then be what role physicians should play in providing such services. The concern can be extended from literature on controversial demands for aesthetic surgery. According to Margaret Little, physicians should be aware that certain aesthetic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Neuroethics: Challenges for the 21st Century.Christopher H. Ramey - 2010 - Philosophical Psychology 23 (1):125-129.
  • Commentary: Cognitive Enhancement: Are the Claims of Critics “Good Enough”?Vojin Rakić - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (4):693-698.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Value and Pitfalls of Speculation About Science and Technology in Bioethics: The Case of Cognitive Enhancement.Eric Racine, Tristana Martin Rubio, Jennifer Chandler, Cynthia Forlini & Jayne Lucke - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (3):325-337.
    In the debate on the ethics of the non-medical use of pharmaceuticals for cognitive performance enhancement in healthy individuals there is a clear division between those who view “cognitive enhancement” as ethically unproblematic and those who see such practices as fraught with ethical problems. Yet another, more subtle issue, relates to the relevance and quality of the contribution of scholarly bioethics to this debate. More specifically, how have various forms of speculation, anticipatory ethics, and methods to predict scientific trends and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • Expectations Regarding Cognitive Enhancement Create Substantial Challenges.E. Racine & C. Forlini - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (8):469-470.
    A recent discussion on cognitive enhancers has caused some controversy in the ethics and neuroscience fields by coming out in favour of making neuropharmaceuticals with enhancing properties available for general consumption. We highlight in this brief commentary why concerns regarding efficacy and safety, demands on resources, and public health are substantive enough to warrant serious reconsideration before pharmaceutical performance enhancement can be widely supported.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Exploring Some Challenges of the Pharmaceutical Cognitive Enhancement Discourse: Users and Policy Recommendations.Toni Pustovrh & Franc Mali - 2013 - Neuroethics 7 (2):137-158.
    The article explores some of the issues that have arisen in the discourse on pharmaceutical cognitive enhancement (PCE), that is, the use of stimulant drugs such as methylphenidate, amphetamine and modafinil by healthy individuals of various populations with the aim of improving cognitive performance. Specifically, we explore the presumed sizes of existing PCE user populations and the policy actions that have been proposed regarding the trend of PCE. We begin with an introductory examination of the academic stances and philosophical issues (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Are Better Workers Also Better Humans? On Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancement in the Workplace and Conflicting Societal Domains.Tony Pustovrh, Franc Mali & Simone Arnaldi - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (3):301-313.
    The article investigates the sociocultural implications of the changing modern workplace and of pharmacological cognitive enhancement as a potential adaptive tool from the viewpoint of social niche construction. We will attempt to elucidate some of the sociocultural and technological trends that drive and influence the characteristics of this specific niche, and especially to identify the kind of capabilities and adaptations that are being promoted, and to ascertain the capabilities and potentialities that might become diminished as a result. In this context, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Response.Brad Partridge - 2010 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (4):385-386.
    Response Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11673-010-9253-3 Authors Brad Partridge, Program in Professionalism and Bioethics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street S.W., Rochester, MN 55905, USA Journal Journal of Bioethical Inquiry Online ISSN 1872-4353 Print ISSN 1176-7529.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Begging Important Questions About Cognitive Enhancement, Again.Wayne Hall, Jonathan Finnoff, Jayne Lucke & Brad Partridge - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (1):14 - 15.
  • The Use of Methylphenidate Among Students: The Future of Enhancement?S. M. Outram - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (4):198-202.
    During the past few years considerable debate has arisen within academic journals with respect to the use of smart drugs or cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals. The following paper seeks to examine the foundations of this cognitive enhancement debate using the example of methylphenidate use among college students. The argument taken is that much of the enhancement debate rests upon inflated assumptions about the ability of such drugs to enhance and over-estimations of either the size of the current market for such drugs (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  • Developing Public Health Approaches to Cognitive Enhancement: An Analysis of Current Reports.S. M. Outram & E. Racine - 2011 - Public Health Ethics 4 (1):93-105.
    In this article, we analyse content from two recent reports to examine how a public health framework to cognitive enhancement is emerging. We find that, in several areas, these reports provide population-level arguments both for and against the use of cognitive enhancers. In discussing these arguments, we look at how these reports are indicative of potentially innovative frameworks—epidemiological, risk/benefit and socio-historical—by which to explore the public health impact of cognitive enhancement. Finally, we argue that these reports are suggestive of both (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Ethical Considerations in the Framing of the Cognitive Enhancement Debate.Simon M. Outram - 2011 - Neuroethics 5 (2):173-184.
    Over the past few years the use of stimulants such as methylphenidate and modafinil among the student population has attracted considerable debate in the pages of bioethics journals. Under the rubric of cognitive enhancement, bioethicists have discussed this use of stimulants—along with future technologies of enhancement—and have launched a sometimes forceful debate of such practices. In the following paper, it is argued that even if we focus solely upon current practices, the term cognitive enhancement encompasses a wide range of ethical (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Freedom of Thought at the Ethical Frontier of Law & Science.Marcus Moore - 2022 - Ethics and Behavior 32 (6):510-531.
    ABSTRACT Some of the most compelling contemporary ethical questions surround 21st Century neuroscientific technologies. Among these, neurocognitive intervention technologies allow an unprecedented ability to alter thought. Concerns exist about their impact on individual freedom, behavior and personhood. They could also distort society, eroding core values of dignity, equality, and diversity. Potent laws are needed to anchor regulation in this rising field. The article explores how the long-neglected human right of Freedom of Thought might protect the integrity of the mind at (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancement : How Neuroscientific Research Could Advance Ethical Debate.Hannah Maslen, Nadira Faulmüller & Julian Savulescu - unknown
    There are numerous ways people can improve their cognitive capacities: good nutrition and regular exercise can produce long-term improvements across many cognitive domains, whilst commonplace stimulants such as coffee temporarily boost levels of alertness and concentration. Effects like these have been well-documented in the medical literature and they raise few ethical issues. More recently, however, clinical research has shown that the off-label use of some pharmaceuticals can, under certain conditions, have modest cognition-improving effects. Substances such as methylphenidate and modafinil can (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  • Neuroethics at 15: Keep the Kant but Add More Bacon.Gabriel Lázaro-Muñoz, Peter Zuk, Stacey Pereira, Kristin Kostick, Laura Torgerson, Demetrio Sierra-Mercado, Mary Majumder, J. Blumenthal-Barby, Eric A. Storch, Wayne K. Goodman & Amy L. McGuire - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (3):97-100.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Towards a Smart Population: A Public Health Framework for Cognitive Enhancement.Jayne Lucke & Brad Partridge - 2012 - Neuroethics 6 (2):419-427.
    This paper presents a novel view of the concept of cognitive enhancement by taking a population health perspective. We propose four main modifiable healthy lifestyle factors for optimal cognitive functioning across the population for which there is evidence of safety and efficacy. These include i) promoting adequate sleep, ii) increasing physical activity, iii) encouraging a healthy diet, including minimising consumption of stimulants, alcohol and other drugs including nicotine, iv) and promoting good mental health. We argue that it is not ethical (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Republication: In That Case. [REVIEW]Jayne Lucke - 2010 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (4):381-382.
    This Article was originally published in Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7(3): 337-338, http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11673-010-9247-1 . It is reprinted here for the sake of coherence.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • In That Case.Jayne Lucke - 2010 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (3):337-338.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Deflating the Neuroenhancement Bubble.Jayne C. Lucke, Stephanie Bell, Brad Partridge & Wayne D. Hall - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 2 (4):38-43.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  • Begging the Question: Presupposing That TMS Can Be Shown to Enhance Eyewitness Testimony.Jayne C. Lucke & Wayne D. Hall - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (3):34-35.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Technological Unemployment and Human Disenhancement.Michele Loi - 2015 - Ethics and Information Technology 17 (3):201-210.
    This paper discusses the concept of “human disenhancement”, i.e. the worsening of human individual abilities and expectations through technology. The goal is provoking ethical reflection on technological innovation outside the biomedical realm, in particular the substitution of human work with computer-driven automation. According to some widely accepted economic theories, automatization and computerization are responsible for the disappearance of many middle-class jobs. I argue that, if that is the case, a technological innovation can be a cause of “human disenhancement”, globally, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Biopolitical Embodiment of Work in the Era of Human Enhancement.Nicolas Le Dévédec - 2020 - Body and Society 26 (1):55-81.
    Human enhancement or the use of technoscientific and biomedical advances to improve human performance is a social phenomenon that has become increasingly significant in Western societies over the last 15 years or so, notably in the workplace. By focusing on the non-medical use of psychostimulants, and from a perspective that is both critical and exploratory, this article aims to show that human enhancement practices prefigure new forms of embodiment and interiorization of work that are contributing to a significant reconfiguration of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Can Neuromodulation Also Enhance Social Inequality? Some Possible Indirect Interventions of the State.Andrea Lavazza - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
  • Cognitive Enhancements and the Values of Higher Education.Matt Lamkin - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (4):347-355.
    Drugs developed to treat cognitive impairments are proving popular with healthy college students seeking to boost their focus and productivity. Concerned observers have called these practices a form of cheating akin to athletes’ use of steroids, with some proposing testing students’ urine to deter “academic doping.” The ease with which critics analogize the academic enterprise to competitive sport, and the impulse to crack down on students using study drugs, reflect the same social influences and trends that spur demand for these (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Intellectual Doping and Pharmaceutical Cognitive Enhancement in Education: Some Ethical Questions.Zdenko Kodelja - 2021 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 55 (1):167-185.
    Journal of Philosophy of Education, EarlyView.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • To ELSI or Not to ELSI Neuroscience: Lessons for Neuroethics From the Human Genome Project.Eran Klein - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (4):3-8.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Rethinking “Cognitive” Enhancement: The Ethical Stakes of User Perspectives.Fred B. Ketchum - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 4 (1):26-27.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Neuroethics Needs an International Human Rights Deliberative Frame.Luis Justo & Fabiana Erazun - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (4):17-18.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Australian University Students’ Coping Strategies and Use of Pharmaceutical Stimulants as Cognitive Enhancers.Charmaine Jensen, Cynthia Forlini, Brad Partridge & Wayne Hall - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Fooled by ‘Smart Drugs’ – Why Shouldn’T Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancement Be Liberally Used in Education?Magen Inon - 2018 - Ethics and Education 14 (1):54-69.
    ABSTRACTResearch shows that various pharmaceuticals can offer modest cognition enhancing effects for healthy individuals. These finding have caused some academics to support liberal use of pharmacological cognitive enhancement in schools and universities. This approach partially arises from arguments implying there is little moral justification for regulating such drugs. In this paper, I argue against the liberal use of PCE on epistemic grounds. According to Charles Taylor, emotions and behaviour are epistemically valuable because they tell us meaningful things about reality. Hence, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Cognitive Enhancement by Drugs in Health and Disease.Masud Husain & Mitul A. Mehta - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (1):28-36.
  • The Need for Interdisciplinary Dialogue in Developing Ethical Approaches to Neuroeducational Research.Paul A. Howard-Jones & Kate D. Fenton - 2011 - Neuroethics 5 (2):119-134.
    This paper argues that many ethical issues in neuroeducational research cannot be appropriately addressed using the principles and guidance available in one of these areas alone, or by applying these in simple combination. Instead, interdisciplinary and public dialogue will be required to develop appropriate normative principles. In developing this argument, it examines neuroscientific and educational perspectives within three broad categories of ethical issue arising at the interface of cognitive neuroscience and education: issues regarding the carrying out of interdisciplinary research, the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • On the Possibilities of the Convergence of Technological Progress and Democratic Social Change: Focusing on the Attempt to Justify Enhancement by the Techno-Progressives技術的進歩と民主的社会変革の融合の可能性.Shinnosuke Horiuchi - 2020 - Journal of the Japan Association for Philosophy of Science 47 (2):97-107.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Virtue(Al) Games—Real Drugs.John T. Holden, Anastasios Kaburakis & Joanna Wall Tweedie - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 13 (1):19-32.
    The growth of esports as a recognized, organized, competitive activity in North America and Europe has evolved steadily from one of the most prominent sport industries in several Asian countries. Esports, which is still pursuing a widely accepted governance structure, has struggled to control the factors that typically act as a breeding ground for sport corruption. Within the esports industry, there is alleged widespread use of both prescription and off-label use of stimulants, such as modafinil, methylphenidate, and dextroamphetamine. Anti-doping policy (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • State Neutrality and Psychopharmacological Enhancement.Elisabeth Hildt - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (2):51-52.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Cognitive Neuroenhancement: False Assumptions in the Ethical Debate.Andreas Heinz, Roland Kipke, Hannah Heimann & Urban Wiesing - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (6):372-375.
    The present work critically examines two assumptions frequently stated by supporters of cognitive neuroenhancement. The first, explicitly methodological, assumption is the supposition of effective and side effect-free neuroenhancers. However, there is an evidence-based concern that the most promising drugs currently used for cognitive enhancement can be addictive. Furthermore, this work describes why the neuronal correlates of key cognitive concepts, such as learning and memory, are so deeply connected with mechanisms implicated in the development and maintenance of addictive behaviour so that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • What It’s Like to Be Good.John Harris - 2012 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (3):293-305.
    In this issue of CQ we introduce a new feature, in which noted bioethicists are invited to reflect on vital current issues. Our first invitee, John Harris, will subsequently assume editorship of this section.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • Taking the “Human” Out of Human Rights.John Harris - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (1):9-20.
    Human rights are universally acknowledged to be important, although they are, of course, by no means universally respected. This universality has helped to combat racism and sexism and other arbitrary and vicious forms of discrimination. Unfortunately, as we shall see, the universality of human rights is both too universal and not universal enough. It is time to take the “human” out of human rights. Indeed, it is very probable that in the future there will be no more humans as we (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Moral Enhancement and Freedom.John Harris - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (2):102-111.
    This paper identifies human enhancement as one of the most significant areas of bioethical interest in the last twenty years. It discusses in more detail one area, namely moral enhancement, which is generating significant contemporary interest. The author argues that so far from being susceptible to new forms of high tech manipulation, either genetic, chemical, surgical or neurological, the only reliable methods of moral enhancement, either now or for the foreseeable future, are either those that have been in human and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   170 citations  
  • Constraints on Regulatory Options for Putatively Cognitive Enhancing Drugs.Wayne Hall, Brad Partridge & Jayne Lucke - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (7):35-37.