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  1. Logical fallacies persist in invasion biology and blaming the messengers will not improve accountability in this field: a response to Frank et al.Christopher W. Tindale & Radu Cornel Guiaşu - 2023 - Biology and Philosophy 38 (1):1-18.
    We analyze the “Logical fallacies and reasonable debates in invasion biology: a response to Guiaşu and Tindale” article by Frank et al., and also discuss this work in the context of recent intense debates in invasion biology, and reactions by leading invasion biologists to critics of aspects of their field. While we acknowledge the attempt by Frank et al., at least in the second half of their paper, to take into account more diverse points of view about non-native species and (...)
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  • Cats and Conservationists: The Debate Over Who Owns the Outdoors.Joan E. Schaffner - 2021 - Journal of Animal Ethics 11 (1):84-92.
    Cats and Conservationists: The Debate Over Who Owns the Outdoors explores the hotly contested debate surrounding outdoor cats, free-living animals, and humans’ role in nature—a debate grounded in conflicting science, ethics, and public policy goals. The authors attempt to sort out the data and values related to this debate and find common ground. However, in so doing, they create several false equivalencies. More helpful to those working on the ground to address outdoor cats would have been a book that, in (...)
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  • Logical fallacies and reasonable debates in invasion biology: a response to Guiaşu and Tindale.David M. Frank, Daniel Simberloff, Jordan Bush, Angela Chuang & Christy Leppanen - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (5):1-11.
    This critical note responds to Guiaşu and Tindale’s “Logical fallacies and invasion biology,” from our perspective as ecologists and philosophers of science engaged in debates about invasion biology and invasive species. We agree that “the level of charges and dismissals” surrounding these debates might be “unhealthy” and that “it will be very difficult for dialogues to move forward unless genuine attempts are made to understand the positions being held and to clarify the terms involved.” Although they raise several important scientific, (...)
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  • Disagreement or denialism? “Invasive species denialism” and ethical disagreement in science.David M. Frank - 2019 - Synthese 198 (Suppl 25):6085-6113.
    Recently, invasion biologists have argued that some of the skepticism expressed in the scientific and lay literatures about the risks of invasive species and other aspects of the consensus within invasion biology is a kind of science denialism. This paper presents an argument that, while some claims made by skeptics of invasion biology share important features with paradigm cases of science denialism, others express legitimate ethical concerns that, even if one disagrees, should not be dismissed as denialist. Further, this case (...)
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