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  1. The Advantages of Moral Diversity.Amélie Oksenberg Rorty - 1992 - Social Philosophy and Policy 9 (2):38.
    We are well served, both practically and morally, by moral and ethical diversity. Moral deliberation requires the collaboration of distinctive perspectives: consequentialist, deontological, perfectionist considerations each contribute significant dimensions in determining what is good and what is right; virtue theory highlights the development of reliable ethical character.
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  • Moral Compromise and Personal Integrity: Exploring the Ethical Issues of Deciding Together in Organizations.Jerry D. Goodstein - 2000 - Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (4):805-819.
    In this paper I explore the topic of moral compromise in institutional settings and highlight how moral compromise may affirm,rather than undermine, personal integrity. Central to this relationship between moral compromise and integrity is a view of the self that is responsive to multiple commitments and grounded in an ethic of responsibility. I elaborate a number of virtues that are related to thisnotion of the self and highlight how these virtues may support the development of individuals who are responsive and (...)
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  • The Pluralist Constellation.Erik Parens - 1995 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (2):197.
    I work at a research institute where the staff spends its time thinking about ethical issues that arise with progress in medicine, the life sciences, and technology. After such thinking, we make public policy recommendations. We pride ourselves in the diversity of our staff: there is a doctor, a lawyer, a linguistic anthropologist, a political scientist, a theologian, some philosophers, and so on. Both men and women do research and we are religiously diverse: Catholics, Jews, Protestants, and atheists.
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  • Just Healthcare Beyond Individualism: Challenges for North American Bioethics.Solomon R. Benatar - 1997 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (4):397.
    Medical practitioners have traditionally seen themselves as part of an international community with shared and unifying scientific and ethical goals in the treatment of disease, the promotion of health, and the protection of life. This shared mission is underpinned by explicit acceptance of traditional concepts of medical morality, and by an implied link between individual human rights and the ethics of medical practice long enshrined in a range of World Medical Association and other medical codes. These have been powerful instruments (...)
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  • Beyond the Conflict: Religion in the Public Sphere and Deliberative Democracy.Elsa González, José Felix Lozano & Pedro Jesús Pérez - 2009 - Res Publica 15 (3):251-267.
    Traditionally, liberals have confined religion to the sphere of the ‘private’ or ‘non-political’. However, recent debates over the place of religious symbols in public spaces, state financing of faith schools, and tax relief for religious organisations suggest that this distinction is not particularly useful in easing the tension between liberal commitments to equality on the one hand, and freedom of religion on the other. This article deals with one aspect of this debate, which concerns whether members of religious communities should (...)
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  • Norms of Legitimate Dissensus.Christian Kock - 2007 - Informal Logic 27 (2):179-196.
    The paper calls for argumentation theory to learn from moral and political philosophy. Several thinkers in these fields help understand the occurrence of what we may call legitimate dissensus: enduring disagreement even between reasonable people arguing reasonably. It inevitably occurs over practical issues, e.g., issues of action rather than truth, because there will normally be legitimate arguments on both sides, and these will be incommensurable, i.e., they cannot be objectively weighed against each other. Accordingly, ‘inference,’ ‘validity,’ and ‘sufficiency’ are inapplicable (...)
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  • Euthanasia: Agreeing to Disagree? [REVIEW]Søren Holm - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):399-402.
    In discussions about the legalisation of active, voluntary euthanasia it is sometimes claimed that what should happen in a liberal society is that the two sides in the debate “agree to disagree”. This paper explores what is entailed by agreeing to disagree and shows that this is considerably more complicated than what is usually believed to be the case. Agreeing to disagree is philosophically problematic and will often lead to an unstable compromise.
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  • An Alternative Model of Political Reasoning.F. M. Frohock - 2006 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 9 (1):27-64.
    The primary instrument of dispute management in political liberalism is a form of political thinking and talking that tries to reconcile opposed positions with an impartial settlement based on fair arrangements and mutual respect, one that is careful to treat rival views equitably, and reasoned through from start to finish with open methods that lead to a public justification understandable to the disputants. But this model of reasoning is notoriously deficient in resolving disputes among radically different communities. A more effective (...)
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  • The Consensus Project and Three Levels of Deliberation.Emmanuel Ifeanyi Ani - forthcoming - Dialogue:1-24.
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  • Religious Pluralism.Veit Bader - 1999 - Political Theory 27 (5):597-633.
  • Religion, Respect and Eberle's Agapic Pacifist.R. B. Talisse - 2012 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (3):313-325.
    Christopher Eberle has developed a powerful critique of justificatory liberalism. According to Eberle, justificatory liberalism’s doctrine of restraint , which requires religious citizens to refrain from publicly advocating for policies that can be supported only by their religious reasons, is illiberal. In this article, I defend justificatory liberalism against Eberle’s critique.
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  • Reflective Equilibrium or Evolving Tradition?Hilliard Aronovitch - 1996 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 39 (3 & 4):399 – 419.
    This paper presents criticisms of the method for moral and political philosophy known as ?reflective equilibrium? (RE), or in its fuller form ?wide reflective equilibrium? (WRE). This negative purpose has an ulterior positive aim: to set off, by favourable contrast, an alternative approach based on analogical argument as an instrument of an evolving (liberal) tradition. WRE derives from John Rawls but has been broadly endorsed. Though a meta?theory, it involves a certain way of construing liberalism. This essay's target is in (...)
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  • Political Liberalism and Citizenship Education.Blain Neufeld - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (9):781-797.
    John Rawls claims that the kind of citizenship education required by political liberalism demands ‘far less’ than that required by comprehensive liberalism. Many educational and political theorists who have explored the implications of political liberalism for education policy have disputed Rawls's claim. Writing from a comprehensive liberal perspective, Amy Gutmann contends that the justificatory differences between political and comprehensive liberalism generally have no practical significance for citizenship education. Political liberals such as Stephen Macedo and Victoria Costa maintain that political liberalism (...)
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  • Non-Coercive Promotion of Values in Civic Education for Democracy.A. Fives - 2013 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (6):577-590.
    This article explores the values that should be promoted in civic education for democracy and also how the promotion of values can be non-coercive. It will be argued that civic education should promote the values of reasonableness, mutual respect and fairness, but also that only public, political reasons count in attempting to justify the content of civic education. It will also be argued that the content of civic education may legitimately be broader than this, including but not restricted to the (...)
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  • Liberalism, Communitarianism and Discussion Method as a Means of Reconciling Controversial Moral Issues.Basil R. Singh - 1997 - Educational Studies 23 (2):169-184.
    While liberals see personal autonomy as paramount in civil society and as intrinsic to human dignity and human rights, others, such as communitarians, see group rights as intrinsic to human development and human welfare. Thus, while generally liberals give no or very little place in their thinking to right-bearing groups or collective entities, others see communities as conditions for self-fulfilment and individual freedom. This paper explores these two positions and argues that a cultural, pluralist, democratic society will be characterised by (...)
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  • Pluralism and Consensus in Deliberative Democracy.José Luis Martí - 2017 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 20 (5):556-579.
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  • Chimeras, Moral Status, and Public Policy: Implications of the Abortion Debate for Public Policy on Human/Nonhuman Chimera Research.Robert Streiffer - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):238-250.
    Researchers are increasingly interested in creating chimeras by transplanting human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into animals early in development. One concern is that such research could confer upon an animal the moral status of a normal human adult but then impermissibly fail to accord it the protections it merits in virtue of its enhanced moral status. Understanding the public policy implications of this ethical conclusion, though, is complicated by the fact that claims about moral status cannot play an unfettered role (...)
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  • On Reconstructive Legal and Political Theory.Bernhard Peters - 1994 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 20 (4):101-134.
  • Liberal Legitimacy, Reasonable Disagreement and Justice.Simon Caney - 1998 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 1 (3):19-36.
    (1998). Liberal legitimacy, reasonable disagreement and justice. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy: Vol. 1, Pluralsim and Liberal Neutrality, pp. 19-36. doi: 10.1080/13698239808403246.
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