Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Who are We, and Who (or What) Do We Want to Become? An Evolutionary Perspective on Biotransformative Technologies.James Lyons-Weiler - 2022 - Biological Theory 17 (2):138-152.
    Human evolution sits at several important thresholds. In organic evolution, interplay between exogenous environmental and genetic factors rendered new phenotypes at rates limited by genetic variation. The interplay took place on adaptive fitness landscapes determined by correspondence of genetic and environmental relationships. Human evolution involved important emergences that altered the adaptive landscape: language, writing, organized societies, science, and the internet. These endogenous factors ushered in transformative periods leading to more rapidly evolving emergences. I explore the impact of development of emerging (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Human Germline Genome Editing: On the Nature of Our Reasons to Genome Edit.Robert Sparrow - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (9):4-15.
    Ever since the publication of Derek Parfit’s Reasons and Persons, bioethicists have tended to distinguish between two different ways in which reproductive technologies may have implications for the...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • The principle of procreative beneficence and its implications for genetic engineering.Luvuyo Gantsho - forthcoming - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-22.
    Molecular genetic engineering technologies such as CRISPR/Cas9 have made the accurate and safe genetic engineering of human embryos possible. Further advances in genomics have isolated genes that predict qualities and traits associated with intelligence. Given these advances, prospective parents could use these biotechnologies to genetically engineer future children for genes that enhance their intelligence. While Julian Savulescu’s Principle of Procreative Beneficence argues for the moral obligation of prospective parents to use in-vitro fertilization and preimplantation genetic diagnosis to make eugenic selections (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Reflexiones Sobre la Herramienta Molecular Que Podría Cambiar El Curso de la Historia Humana: La Edición Genómica.Pedro Alexander Velasquez-Vasconez - 2022 - Persona y Bioética 26 (1):2613-2613.
    Genetic editing has many applications in almost all areas of society, but may also lead to unpredictable consequences. Genome editing to modify the human germline is at the center of global discussion. Owing to the increasing number of unanswered scientific, ethical, and policy questions, the scientific community agrees that it would be inappropriate to genetically modify embryos. A serious and open debate is necessary to decide whether such research should be suspended or encouraged. Here we show some bold arguments in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Is South Africa Ready for the Future of Human Germline Genome Editing? Comparing South African Law and Recent Proposals for Global Governance.T. Kamwendo & B. Shozi - 2021 - South African Journal of Bioethics and Law 14 (3):97-100.
    Over the past few years, developments in the science of precise editing of human genomes using CRISPR-Cas9 have led many countries that lack specific laws in this area, such as South Africa, to contemplate legal reform. Thaldar et al. recently published five principles to guide legal reform in SA on heritable genome editing. In a similar vein, concerns about the global impact of human germline genome editing have led to calls for a global regulatory mechanism. This is what the World (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ethical Challenges in Human Space Missions: A Space Refuge, Scientific Value, and Human Gene Editing for Space.Konrad Szocik, Ziba Norman & Michael J. Reiss - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (3):1209-1227.
    This article examines some selected ethical issues in human space missions including human missions to Mars, particularly the idea of a space refuge, the scientific value of space exploration, and the possibility of human gene editing for deep-space travel. Each of these issues may be used either to support or to criticize human space missions. We conclude that while these issues are complex and context-dependent, there appear to be no overwhelming obstacles such as cost effectiveness, threats to human life or (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • ‘Eugenics is Back’? Historic References in Current Discussions of Germline Gene Editing.Robert Ranisch - 2019 - NanoEthics 13 (3):209-222.
    Comparisons between germline gene editing using CRISPR technology and a renewal of eugenics are evident in the current bioethical discussions. This article examines the different roles of such references to the past. In the first part, the alleged parallels between gene editing of the germline and eugenics are addressed from three perspectives: First, the historical adequacy of such comparisons is questioned. Second, it is asked whether the evils of the past can in fact be attributed to practices of germline gene (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ethical Issues Raised by Intergenerational Monitoring in Clinical Trials of Germline Gene Modification.Austen Yeager - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (4):267-270.
    As research involving gene editing continues to advance, we are headed in the direction of being able to modify the human germline. Should we reach a point where an argument can be made that the benefits of preventing unborn children and future generations from inheriting genetic conditions that cause tremendous suffering outweigh the risks associated with altering the human germline, the next step will be to design clinical trials using this technology in humans. These clinical trials will likely require careful (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Commentary on ‘Moral Reasons to Edit the Human Genome’: This is Not the Moral Imperative We Are Looking For.Sarah Chan - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (8):528-529.
    After reading Savulescu and colleagues,1 one ought to be in no doubt that human heritable genome editing is a ‘moral imperative’: to cure disease, reduce inequalities, improve public health and protect future generations. They make this argument repeatedly and in no uncertain terms. Yet are they right to do so? I am certainly not against developing HGE or exploring its possibilities. Instead, I aim to sound a cautionary note in relation to claims about its technological potential and how we frame (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • We Need to Talk About Imperatives.Jesse Wall - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (8):487-488.
    The feature article in this edition outlines and then critically examines the Nuffield Council of Bioethics’ Report, ‘Genome Editing and Human Reproduction: Social and Ethical issues’. While Christopher Gyngell, Hilary Bowman-Smart & Julian Savulescu, ‘support the approach taken by the Nuffield Council’,1 their findings are stronger than those in the Report, arguing that - beyond being permissible - many instances of heritable genome editing will be moral imperatives. A collection of engaging responses to this feature article are provided by Rachel (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Genome Editing, Goldilocks and Polygenic Risk Scores.Julian Savulescu & Christopher Gyngell - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (8):530-531.
    Heritable genome editing is officially here. ‘Lulu’ and ‘Nana’, born in China, are the first children whose genomes have been intentionally modified. A third gene edited baby may have already been born. Scientists in Russia are planning similar applications.1 We recently argued that HGE should be judged by the same ethical standards that we apply to other technologies.2 There is a moral imperative to improve the health of future generations, to reduce inequalities and improve standards of living. If we can (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The ‘Serious’ Factor in Germline Modification.Erika Kleiderman, Vardit Ravitsky & Bartha Maria Knoppers - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (8):508-513.
    Current advances in assisted reproductive technologies aim to promote the health and well-being of future children. They offer the possibility to select embryos with the greatest potential of being born healthy and may someday correct faulty genes responsible for heritable diseases in the embryo ). Most laws and policy statements surrounding HGGM refer to the notion of ‘serious’ as a core criterion in determining what genetic diseases should be targeted by these technologies. Yet, this notion remains vague and poorly defined, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Goldilocks and the Two Principles. A Response to Gyngell Et Al.Peter Mills - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (8):524-525.
    In their paper Chris Gyngell, Hilary Bowman-Smart and Julian Savulescu offer a careful analysis of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics report, Genome Editing and Human Reproduction: social and ethical issues but they challenge us to go further still.i I want to suggest that, although their analysis is clear and accurate, its rather ‘molecular’ approach neglects the overall arc and orientation of the report. Furthermore, their conclusions about prospective parents’ reproductive obligations lack sensitivity to the proper evaluative context and offer littlein (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Is Human Enhancement in Space a Moral Duty? Missions to Mars, Advanced AI and Genome Editing in Space.Konrad Szocik - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):122-130.
    :Any space program involving long-term human missions will have to cope with serious risks to human health and life. Because currently available countermeasures are insufficient in the long term, there is a need for new, more radical solutions. One possibility is a program of human enhancement for future deep space mission astronauts. This paper discusses the challenges for long-term human missions of a space environment, opening the possibility of serious consideration of human enhancement and a fully automated space exploration, based (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Can Attitudes Toward Genome Editing Better Inform Cognitive Enhancement Policy?Davide Battisti, Alessandra Gasparetto & Mario Picozzi - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):59-61.
    The article by Conrad et al. (AJOB Neuroscience, 2019, 10:1) does not take into account another, still hypothetical, procedure for cognitive enhancement (CE) which would be appropriate to consider in the surveys, i.e. the possibility to genetically enhance the cognitive abilities of a future individual using genome editing techniques. In this case, the conclusions of the article in the context of the “self-others difference” and “safety/naturalness” would be questioned. In fact, the results of the hypothetical surveys with the variant “genome (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation