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  1. The Limits of Sovereignty as Responsibility.Adom Getachew - 2019 - Constellations 26 (2):225-240.
  • Military Intervention in Two Registers.Bat-Ami Bar On - 2008 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (S1):21-31.
  • Military Intervention in Two Registers.Bat-Ami Bar - 2008 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (S1):21-31.
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  • Dehumanising the Dehumanisers: Reversal in Human Rights Discourse.Robert Fine - 2010 - Journal of Global Ethics 6 (2):179-190.
    If the legitimacy of international humanitarian and human rights law lies, in part at least, in its capacity to confront dehumanising actions in the modern world, we may speak of the limits of this achievement. It is well known that people who commit genocide or crimes against humanity typically dehumanise those against whom their crimes are committed and that the humanitarian and human rights dimensions of international law were developed in response to the radicalisation of this phenomenon. The expanded scope (...)
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  • Natural Law Reasoning Between Statism and Dystopia: International Law and the Question of Authority.Esther D. Reed - 2010 - Jurisprudence 1 (2):169-196.
    This essay argues that a restatement of Thomistic natural law reasoning is increasingly necessary in jurisprudential debate about international law. Mindful of Pope John Paul II's call for a renewal of international law, the essay engages with the present-day tension between Morgenthau-type realism and neo-Kantian discourse-oriented cosmopolitanism. The essay addresses whether the former is sufficiently realistic in our global 21st century context, and whether the latter is adequately cosmopolitan. Attention is drawn to Aquinas's understanding of the relation between custom, consent (...)
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  • The Limits of Kant’s Cosmopolitanism: Theory, Practice, and the Crisis in Syria.Matthew C. Altman - 2017 - Kantian Review 22 (2):179-204.
  • The Vicious Circles of Habermas’ Cosmopolitics.Isobel Roele - 2014 - Law and Critique 25 (3):199-229.
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  • Why a Charter of Fundamental Human Rights in the EU?Erik Oddvar Eriksen - 2003 - Ratio Juris 16 (3):352-373.
  • Contribution to a New Critical Theory of Multiculturalism.Matus tík Martin Beck - 2002 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (4):473-482.
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  • Just War Theory, Humanitarian Intervention, and the Need for a Democratic Federation.John J. Davenport - 2011 - Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (3):493-555.
    The primary purpose of government is to secure public goods that cannot be achieved by free markets. The Coordination Principle tells us to consolidate sovereign power in a single institution to overcome collective action problems that otherwise prevent secure provision of the relevant public goods. There are several public goods that require such coordination at the global level, chief among them being basic human rights. The claim that human rights require global coordination is supported in three main steps. First, I (...)
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