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  1. Pierre Hadot, Albert Camus and the Orphic View of Nature.Matthew Sharpe - 2020 - Continental Philosophy Review 54 (1):17-39.
    Albert Camus repeatedly denied the label “existentialist,” and pointed to his formative experiences of natural beauty and his early introduction to classical Greek thought and culture as determinative of his philosophy. Pierre Hadot, famous for his post-1970 work on philosophy as a way of life in classical antiquity, continued throughout his life to work on the history of Western conceptions of nature. In Le voile d’Isis, Hadot excavated a second strain of Western attitudes towards nature, alongside the instrumental or “Promethean” (...)
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  • Wittgenstein: Spiritual Practices.Gordon C. F. Bearn - 2019 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 53 (4):701-714.
  • Wittgenstein at Cambridge: Philosophy as a Way of Life.Michael A. Peters & Jeff Stickney - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (8):767-778.
    Ludwig Wittgenstein was a reclusive and enigmatic philosopher, writing his most significant work off campus in remote locations. He also held a chair in the Philosophy Department at Cambridge, and is one of the university’s most recognized even if, as Ray Monk says, ‘reluctant professors’ of philosophy. Paradoxically, although Wittgenstein often showed contempt for the atmosphere at Cambridge and for academic philosophy in particular, it is hard to conceive of him making his significant contributions without considerable support from his academic (...)
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  • Henry David Thoreau's Anti‐Work Spirituality and a New Theological Ethic of Work.Jonathan Malesic - 2017 - Journal of Religious Ethics 45 (2):309-329.
    Although Henry David Thoreau stands outside the Christian canon, his outlook on the relations among spirituality, ecology, and economy highlights how Christian theologians can develop a theological work ethic in our era of economic and ecological precarity. He can furthermore help theologians counter the pro-work bias in much Christian thought. In Walden, Thoreau shows that the best work is an ascetic practice that reveals and reaps the abundance of nature and connects the person to the immanent divine and thereby glimpsing (...)
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  • Neoliberal Education for Work Versus Liberal Education for Leisure.Kevin Gary - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (1):83-94.
    My concern in this essay is not so much with the invisible work or hidden labor produced by neoliberalism, but rather with what Joseph Pieper describes as an emerging culture of “total work”. More than the sheer number of hours of work, Pieper diagnoses a transformation in the way we view work. Work has become the exclusive point of reference for how we see and define ourselves. We are, Pieper feared, increasingly incapable of seeing beyond the working self. The human (...)
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  • C. S. Peirce: la vita della scienza e il desiderio di apprendere.Jaime Nubiola - 2016 - In Ariberto Acerbi, Andrés Mijangos Labastida & G. Luise (eds.), La filosofia come paideia. Contributi sul ruolo educativo degli studi filosofici. Roma, Italia: pp. 115-129.
    Twenty years ago I put a sign on the door to my office —and it’s still there— with the sentence of Peirce that I have used in my title: "The life of science is in the desire to learn" (CP 1.235, c.1902). I learned this quote from the late professor of logic at MIT, George Boolos. Like him, I put it on my door to invite students to come in to inquire, to ask questions, since their questions are not just (...)
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  • Environmental Philosophy as A Way of Life. Svoboda - 2016 - Ethics and the Environment 21 (1):39-60.
    Environmental philosophy is particularly well-suited to facilitate a revival of a philosophical art of living, or the practice of philosophy as a way of life. The notion that philosophy involves the practice of living well is most often associated with Hellenistic figures, but it is also present in some modern philosophical writers. However, despite interest in this tradition of philosophy from the likes of Michel Foucault, Martha Nussbaum, and Pierre Hadot, the practice of philosophy as a way of life is (...)
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  • Therapeutic Arguments, Spiritual Exercises, or the Care of the Self. Martha Nussbaum, Pierre Hadot and Michel Foucault on Ancient Philosophy.Konrad Banicki - 2015 - Ethical Perspectives 22 (4):601-634.
    The practical aspect of ancient philosophy has been recently made a focus of renewed metaphilosophical investigation. After a brief presentation of three accounts of this kind developed by Martha Nussbaum, Pierre Hadot, and Michel Foucault, the model of the therapeutic argument developed by Nussbaum is called into question from the perspectives offered by her French colleagues, who emphasize spiritual exercise (Hadot) or the care of the self (Foucault). The ways in which the account of Nussbaum can be defended are then (...)
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  • This is a Philosopher: On Educational Philosophy in an Age of Psychologisation.Nancy Vansieleghem - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (6):601-612.
    Nowadays there is a renewed interest in philosophy as art-of-living. Several prominent authors have pointed out the return of the notion of the good life in philosophy, particularly understood as a form of normative ethics. Questions such as: how should I live have been taken up as a resistance against the dominances of a neo-liberal discourse in all areas of life. This paper is concerned with this renewed interest in philosophy as art-of-living and the form of education that supports this. (...)
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