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  1. Books Received. [REVIEW][author unknown] - 2002 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 45 (4):561-563.
    Habermas and Pragmatism, ed. Mitchell Aboulafia, Myra Bookman, and Catherine Kemp. London/new York: Routledge: 2002, xi + 244 pp., pb. £15.99. Wittgenstein, Rules and Institutions, David Bloor. London/new York: Routledge, 2002, xvi + 173 pp., pb. £17.99. What Ought I to Do?: Morality in Kant and Levinas, Catherine Chalier. Trans. Jane Marie Todd. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2002, 197 pp., $45.00, pb. $17.95. Social and Political Philosophy: A Contemporary Introduction, John Christman. Routledge Contemporary Introductions to Philosophy. London/new York: Routledge, (...)
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  • Herodotus and the Map of Aristagoras.David Branscome - 2010 - Classical Antiquity 29 (1):1-44.
    Herodotus uses the encounter between the Milesian tyrant Aristagoras and the Spartan king Cleomenes to further his authorial self-presentation. He contrasts his own aims and methods as an inquirer with those of Aristagoras, who becomes a “rival” inquirer for Herodotus in this passage. Seeking military aid from Cleomenes for the Ionian Revolt, Aristagoras points to his bronze map of the world and gives an ethnographical and geographical account of the peoples and land of Asia, from Ionia to Susa. Aristagoras accordingly (...)
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  • Femininity and Masculinity in City-Form: Philosophical Urbanism as a History of Consciousness.Abraham Akkerman - 2006 - Human Studies 29 (2):229-256.
    Mutual feedback between human-made environments and facets of thought throughout history has yielded two myths: the Garden and the Citadel. Both myths correspond to Jung’s feminine and masculine collective subconscious, as well as to Nietzsche’s premise of Apollonian and Dionysian impulses in art. Nietzsche’s premise suggests, furthermore, that the feminine myth of the Garden is time-bound whereas the masculine myth of the Citadel, or the Ideal City, constitutes a spatial deportment. Throughout history the two myths have continually molded the built (...)
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