Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Simplicity and the Meaning of Mental Association.Mike Dacey - 2019 - Erkenntnis 84 (6):1207-1228.
    Some thoughts just come to mind together. This is usually thought to happen because they are connected by associations, which the mind follows. Such an explanation assumes that there is a particular kind of simple psychological process responsible. This view has encountered criticism recently. In response, this paper aims to characterize a general understanding of associative simplicity, which might support the distinction between associative processing and alternatives. I argue that there are two kinds of simplicity that are treated as characteristic (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Mental Models and Deduction.Philip N. Johnson-Laird - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (10):434-442.
  • Meta-Analysis: How Does Posterior Parietal Cortex Contribute to Reasoning?Carter Wendelken - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  • Dimensions of Reliability in Phenomenal Judgment.Brentyn J. Ramm - 2016 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 23 (3-4):101-127.
    Eric Schwitzgebel (2011) argues that phenomenal judgments are in general less reliable than perceptual judgments. This paper distinguishes two versions of this unreliability thesis. The process unreliability thesis says that unreliability in phenomenal judgments is due to faulty domain-specific mechanisms involved in producing these judgments, whereas the statistical unreliability thesis says that it is simply a matter of higher numbers of errors. Against the process unreliability thesis, I argue that the main errors and limitations in making phenomenal judgments can be (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Relational Priming Plays a Supporting but Not Leading Role in Adult Analogy-Making.Alexander A. Petrov - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (4):392-393.
    Leech et al.'s analysis adds to an emerging consensus of the role of priming in analogy-making. However, their model cannot scale up to adult-level performance because not all relations can be cast as functions. One-size-fits-all accounts cannot capture the richness of analogy. Proportional analogies and transitive inferences can be made by nonstructural mechanisms. Therefore, these tasks do not generalize to tasks that require structure mapping.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Darwin's Triumph: Explaining the Uniqueness of the Human Mind Without a Deus Ex Machina.Derek C. Penn, Keith J. Holyoak & Daniel J. Povinelli - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (2):153-178.
    In our target article, we argued that there is a profound functional discontinuity between the cognitive abilities of modern humans and those of all other extant species. Unsurprisingly, our hypothesis elicited a wide range of responses from commentators. After responding to the commentaries, we conclude that our hypothesis lies closer to Darwin's views on the matter than to those of many of our contemporaries.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Analogy as Relational Priming: The Challenge of Self-Reflection.Andrea Cheshire, Linden J. Ball & Charlie N. Lewis - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (4):381-382.
    Despite its strengths, Leech et al.'s model fails to address the important benefits that derive from self-explanation and task feedback in analogical reasoning development. These components encourage explicit, self-reflective processes that do not necessarily link to knowledge accretion. We wonder, therefore, what mechanisms can be included within a connectionist framework to model self-reflective involvement and its beneficial consequences.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Distributed Representations.Tony Plate - 2002 - In Lynn Nadel (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Macmillan.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Convolution‐Based Memory Models.Tony A. Plate - 2003 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
  • Bayesian Analogy with Relational Transformations.Hongjing Lu, Dawn Chen & Keith J. Holyoak - 2012 - Psychological Review 119 (3):617-648.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • A Theory of the Discovery and Predication of Relational Concepts.Leonidas A. A. Doumas, John E. Hummel & Catherine M. Sandhofer - 2008 - Psychological Review 115 (1):1-43.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   49 citations  
  • Conceptual Structure and the Procedural Affordances of Rational Numbers: Relational Reasoning with Fractions and Decimals.Melissa DeWolf, Miriam Bassok & Keith J. Holyoak - 2015 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 144 (1):127-150.
  • Analogical and Category-Based Inference: A Theoretical Integration with Bayesian Causal Models.Keith J. Holyoak, Hee Seung Lee & Hongjing Lu - 2010 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 139 (4):702-727.
  • A Central Capacity Limit to the Simultaneous Storage of Visual and Auditory Arrays in Working Memory.J. Scott Saults & Nelson Cowan - 2007 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 136 (4):663-684.
  • Modeling Discrete and Continuous Entities with Fractions and Decimals.Monica Rapp, Miriam Bassok, Melissa DeWolf & Keith J. Holyoak - 2015 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 21 (1):47-56.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Meaning From Environmental Sounds: Types of Signal-Referent Relations and Their Effect on Recognizing Auditory Icons.Peter Keller & Catherine Stevens - 2004 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 10 (1):3-12.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Separating Cognitive Capacity From Knowledge: A New Hypothesis.Glenda Andrews Graeme S. Halford, Nelson Cowan - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (6):236.
  • Developing Structured Representations.Leonidas A. A. Doumas & Lindsey E. Richland - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (4):384-385.
    Leech et al.'s model proposes representing relations as primed transformations rather than as structured representations (explicit representations of relations and their roles dynamically bound to fillers). However, this renders the model unable to explain several developmental trends (including relational integration and all changes not attributable to growth in relational knowledge). We suggest looking to an alternative computational model that learns structured representations from examples.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Cognitive Representation of “Musical Fractals”: Processing Hierarchy and Recursion in the Auditory Domain.Mauricio Dias Martins, Bruno Gingras, Estela Puig-Waldmueller & W. Tecumseh Fitch - 2017 - Cognition 161:31-45.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Processing Capacity Limits Are Not Explained by Storage Limits.Graeme S. Halford, Steven Phillips & William H. Wilson - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):123-124.
    Cowan's review shows that a short-term memory limit of four items is consistent with a wide range of phenomena in the field. However, he does not explain that limit, whereas an existing theory does offer an explanation for capacity limitations. Furthermore, processing capacity limits cannot be reduced to storage limits as Cowan claims.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Developing PFC Representations Using Reinforcement Learning.Jeremy R. Reynolds & Randall C. O’Reilly - 2009 - Cognition 113 (3):281-292.
  • Optimization and Quantization in Gradient Symbol Systems: A Framework for Integrating the Continuous and the Discrete in Cognition.Paul Smolensky, Matthew Goldrick & Donald Mathis - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (6):1102-1138.
    Mental representations have continuous as well as discrete, combinatorial properties. For example, while predominantly discrete, phonological representations also vary continuously; this is reflected by gradient effects in instrumental studies of speech production. Can an integrated theoretical framework address both aspects of structure? The framework we introduce here, Gradient Symbol Processing, characterizes the emergence of grammatical macrostructure from the Parallel Distributed Processing microstructure (McClelland, Rumelhart, & The PDP Research Group, 1986) of language processing. The mental representations that emerge, Distributed Symbol Systems, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • A Solution to the Binding Problem for Compositional Connectionism.John E. Hummel, Keith J. Holyoak, Collin Green, Leonidas Aa Doumas, Derek Devnich, Aniket Kittur & Donald J. Kalar - 2004 - In Simon D. Levy & Ross Gayler (eds.), Compositional Connectionism in Cognitive Science. Aaai Press.
  • Human Logic in Spatial Reasoning.Marco Ragni - 2008 - In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 933--939.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Identifying Sources of Intractability in Cognitive Models: An Illustration Using Analogical Structure Mapping.Iris van Rooij, Patricia Evans, Moritz Müller, Jason Gedge & Todd Wareham - 2008 - In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society.
  • When Learning to Classify by Relations is Easier Than by Features.Bradley C. Love & Marc T. Tomlinson - 2010 - Thinking and Reasoning 16 (4):372-401.
  • Minds, Persons, and Space: An fMRI Investigation Into the Relational Complexity of Higher-Order Intentionality.Anna Abraham, Markus Werning, Hannes Rakoczy, D. Yves von Cramon & Ricarda I. Schubotz - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (2):438-450.
    Mental state reasoning or theory-of-mind has been the subject of a rich body of imaging research. Although such investigations routinely tap a common set of regions, the precise function of each area remains a contentious matter. With the help of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we sought to determine which areas are involved when processing mental state or intentional metarepresentations by focusing on the relational aspect of such representations. Using non-intentional relational representations such as spatial relations between persons and between (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Context-Sensitive Inference, Modularity, and the Assumption of Formal Processing.Mitch Parsell - 2005 - Philosophical Psychology 18 (1):45-58.
    Performance on the Wason selection task varies with content. This has been taken to demonstrate that there are different cognitive modules for dealing with different conceptual domains. This implication is only legitimate if our underlying cognitive architecture is formal. A non-formal system can explain content-sensitive inference without appeal to independent inferential modules.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Human Kinship, From Conceptual Structure to Grammar.Doug Jones - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (5):367.
    Research in anthropology has shown that kin terminologies have a complex combinatorial structure and vary systematically across cultures. This article argues that universals and variation in kin terminology result from the interaction of (1) an innate conceptual structure of kinship, homologous with conceptual structure in other domains, and (2) principles of optimal, communication active in language in general. Kin terms from two languages, English and Seneca, show how terminologies that look very different on the surface may result from variation in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Interaction of the Explicit and the Implicit in Skill Learning: A Dual-Process Approach.Ron Sun - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (1):159-192.
    This article explicates the interaction between implicit and explicit processes in skill learning, in contrast to the tendency of researchers to study each type in isolation. It highlights various effects of the interaction on learning (including synergy effects). The authors argue for an integrated model of skill learning that takes into account both implicit and explicit processes. Moreover, they argue for a bottom-up approach (first learning implicit knowledge and then explicit knowledge) in the integrated model. A variety of qualitative data (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  • Connectionist Inference Models.Ron Sun - manuscript
    The performance of symbolic inference tasks has long been a challenge to connectionists. In this paper, we present an extended survey of this area. Existing connectionist inference systems are reviewed, with particular reference to how they perform variable binding and rule- based reasoning and whether they involve distributed or localist representations. The bene®ts and disadvantages of different representations and systems are outlined, and conclusions drawn regarding the capabilities of connectionist inference systems when compared with symbolic inference systems or when used (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Darwin's Mistake: Explaining the Discontinuity Between Human and Nonhuman Minds.Derek C. Penn, Keith J. Holyoak & Daniel J. Povinelli - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (2):109-130.
    Over the last quarter century, the dominant tendency in comparative cognitive psychology has been to emphasize the similarities between human and nonhuman minds and to downplay the differences as (Darwin 1871). In the present target article, we argue that Darwin was mistaken: the profound biological continuity between human and nonhuman animals masks an equally profound discontinuity between human and nonhuman minds. To wit, there is a significant discontinuity in the degree to which human and nonhuman animals are able to approximate (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   164 citations  
  • Impaired Reasoning and Problem-Solving in Individuals with Language Impairment Due to Aphasia or Language Delay.Juliana V. Baldo, Selvi R. Paulraj, Brian C. Curran & Nina F. Dronkers - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Exploring the Conceptual and Semantic Structure of Human Kinship: An Experimental Investigation of Chinese Kin Terms.Chao Liu, Yue Ge, Xiaoqin Mai & Yue-Jia Luo - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (5):392-394.
    We designed an experiment to test the application of optimality theory (OT) in kinship terminology studies. Specifically, we examined the OT constraints within a set of behavioral data using Chinese kin terms. The results from this behavioral approach support and extend Jones' linguistic approach by identifying underlying cognitive mechanisms that can explain and predict behavioral responses in kinship identification.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Visual Relations Children Find Easy and Difficult to Process in Figural Analogies.Claire E. Stevenson, Rosa A. Alberto, Max A. van den Boom & Paul A. L. de Boeck - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • So, Are We the Massively Lucky Species?Derek C. Penn, Keith J. Holyoak & Daniel J. Povinelli - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):236-237.
    We are in vehement agreement with most of Vaesen's key claims. But Vaesen fails to consider or rebut the possibility that there are deep causal dependencies among the various cognitive traits he identifies as uniquely human. We argue that is one such linchpin trait in the evolution of human tool use, social intelligence, language, and culture.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • First-Person Investigations of Consciousness.Brentyn Ramm - 2016 - Dissertation, The Australian National University
    This dissertation defends the reliability of first-person methods for studying consciousness, and applies first-person experiments to two philosophical problems: the experience of size and of the self. In chapter 1, I discuss the motivations for taking a first-person approach to consciousness, the background assumptions of the dissertation and some methodological preliminaries. In chapter 2, I address the claim that phenomenal judgements are far less reliable than perceptual judgements (Schwitzgebel, 2011). I argue that the main errors and limitations in making phenomenal (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Sculpting the Space of Actions. Explaining Human Action by Integrating Intentions and Mechanisms.Machiel Keestra - 2014 - Dissertation, University of Amsterdam
    How can we explain the intentional nature of an expert’s actions, performed without immediate and conscious control, relying instead on automatic cognitive processes? How can we account for the differences and similarities with a novice’s performance of the same actions? Can a naturalist explanation of intentional expert action be in line with a philosophical concept of intentional action? Answering these and related questions in a positive sense, this dissertation develops a three-step argument. Part I considers different methods of explanations in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Interlinking Physical Beliefs: Children’s Bias Towards Logical Congruence.Heidi Kloos - 2007 - Cognition 103 (2):227-252.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Prolegomena to a Cognitive Investigation of Euclidean Diagrammatic Reasoning.Yacin Hamami & John Mumma - 2013 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 22 (4):421-448.
    Euclidean diagrammatic reasoning refers to the diagrammatic inferential practice that originated in the geometrical proofs of Euclid’s Elements. A seminal philosophical analysis of this practice by Manders (‘The Euclidean diagram’, 2008) has revealed that a systematic method of reasoning underlies the use of diagrams in Euclid’s proofs, leading in turn to a logical analysis aiming to capture this method formally via proof systems. The central premise of this paper is that our understanding of Euclidean diagrammatic reasoning can be fruitfully advanced (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Goal Neglect and Knowledge Chunking in the Construction of Novel Behaviour.Apoorva Bhandari & John Duncan - 2014 - Cognition 130 (1):11-30.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Semantic Grounding in Models of Analogy: An Environmental Approach.Michael Ramscar & Daniel Yarlett - 2003 - Cognitive Science 27 (1):41-71.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • The Impact of Individual Differences, Types of Model and Social Settings on Block Building Performance Among Chinese Preschoolers.Mi Tian, Zhu Deng, Zhaokun Meng, Rui Li, Zhiyi Zhang, Wenhui Qi, Rui Wang, Tingting Yin & Menghui Ji - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Planning Following Stroke: A Relational Complexity Approach Using the Tower of London.Glenda Andrews, Graeme S. Halford, Mark Chappell, Annick Maujean & David H. K. Shum - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  • Relational Knowledge: The Foundation of Higher Cognition.Graeme S. Halford, William H. Wilson & Steven Phillips - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (11):497-505.
  • Generative Inferences Based on Learned Relations.Dawn Chen, Hongjing Lu & Keith J. Holyoak - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S5):1062-1092.
    A key property of relational representations is their generativity: From partial descriptions of relations between entities, additional inferences can be drawn about other entities. A major theoretical challenge is to demonstrate how the capacity to make generative inferences could arise as a result of learning relations from non-relational inputs. In the present paper, we show that a bottom-up model of relation learning, initially developed to discriminate between positive and negative examples of comparative relations, can be extended to make generative inferences. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Effects of Subclinical Depression and Aging on Generative Reasoning About Linear Orders: Same or Different Processing Limitations?Grzegorz Sedek & Ulrich von Hecker - 2004 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 133 (2):237-260.
  • Task Complexity Moderates the Influence of Descriptions in Decisions From Experience.Leonardo Weiss-Cohen, Emmanouil Konstantinidis, Maarten Speekenbrink & Nigel Harvey - 2018 - Cognition 170:209-227.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • How Diagrams Can Support Syllogistic Reasoning: An Experimental Study.Yuri Sato & Koji Mineshima - 2015 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 24 (4):409-455.
    This paper explores the question of what makes diagrammatic representations effective for human logical reasoning, focusing on how Euler diagrams support syllogistic reasoning. It is widely held that diagrammatic representations aid intuitive understanding of logical reasoning. In the psychological literature, however, it is still controversial whether and how Euler diagrams can aid untrained people to successfully conduct logical reasoning such as set-theoretic and syllogistic reasoning. To challenge the negative view, we build on the findings of modern diagrammatic logic and introduce (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Development of Category Learning Strategies: What Makes the Difference?Rubi Hammer, Gil Diesendruck, Daphna Weinshall & Shaul Hochstein - 2009 - Cognition 112 (1):105-119.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations