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  1. Ren-Li, Reciprocity, Judgment, and the Question of Openness to the Other in the Confucian Lunyu.Meiyao Wu - 2013 - Journal of Moral Education 42 (4):430-442.
    Here the author takes ren-humanity to be, as Confucius says, an underlying, ineffable, potentially universal human quality, and draws a distinction between three different types of moral capacity in the Lunyu: the man of ren?s capacity for li-proper interactions, his capacity for total reciprocity with another, and his capacity to make moral discriminations. The nature of these moral judgments is then discussed in relation to the praxis of entering into shu-reciprocity with another and that of recognizing others? actions as being (...)
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  • Whitehead, Confucius, and the Aesthetics of Virtue.Nicholas F. Gier - 2004 - Asian Philosophy 14 (2):171 – 190.
    The most constructive response to the crisis in moral theory has been the revival of virtue ethics, an ethics that has the advantages of being personal, contextual, and, as this paper will argue, normative as well. The first section offers a general comparative analysis of Confucian and Whiteheadian philosophies, showing their common process orientation and their views of a somatic self united in reason and passion. The second section contrasts rational with aesthetic order, demonstrating a parallel with analytic and synthetic (...)
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  • Confucian Democracy as Popular Sovereignty.Ranjoo Seodu Herr - 2019 - Asian Philosophy 29 (3):201-220.
    ABSTRACTIs Confucian democracy philosophically justifiable? In recent decades, prominent Confucian theorists have answered this question in the negative, arguing that the political system that is c...
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  • Modernization of Confucian Ontology in Taiwan and Mainland China.Jana S. Rošker - 2019 - Asian Philosophy 29 (2):160-176.
    ABSTRACTThe present paper compares three models of modernized Confucian Ontology. The philosophers under debate belong to the most important, well-known and influential theoreticians in modern Taiwan and mainland China respectively. Through a contrastive analysis, the paper aims to critically introduce three alternative models of ontology, which have been developed from the Chinese philosophical tradition by the most well-known Taiwanese philosopher Mou Zongsan and by two most influential mainland Chinese theoreticians, Li Zehou and Chen Lai respectively. In this paper, I will (...)
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  • A Confucian in Buddhist Clothing? – Interpreting Nishida’s Conception of the Good as a Realisation of the Mandate of Heaven.Thomas Parry Rhydwen - 2018 - Asian Philosophy 28 (4):368-392.
    ABSTRACTIn this study, I examine the Confucian influence upon An Inquiry into the Good, the first publication of Nishida Kitarō. Nishida’s student Kōsaka Masaaki depicts his mentor’s conception of the good in terms of realising the 'Mandate of Heaven'. Taking this to be indicative of the importance of Confucianism for Nishida’s early thought, I compare his philosophy of pure experience and ethical project of ‘self-realisation’ with corresponding ideas found in the Confucian corpus. I especially focus on the Great Learning and (...)
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  • Ethics of Learning and Self-Knowledge: Two Cases in the Socratic and Confucian Teachings.Duck-Joo Kwak - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (1):7-22.
    This paper attempts to do a comparative study on two traditions of humanistic pedagogies, West and East, represented by the Socratic and the Confucian teachings. It is intended to put into question our common misunderstanding reflected in the stereotyped contrasts between the Socratic self and the Confucian self: an intellectualist vs. a moralist, an active vs. a passive learner, and a political progressive vs. a political conservative. In this attempt, I will focus on the clarification of the idea of ‘self-knowledge’ (...)
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  • Sakuma Shozan's Hegelian Vision for Japan.John E. Van Sant - 2004 - Asian Philosophy 14 (3):277 – 292.
    By the mid-19th century, an increasing number of Japan's political leaders and scholars realized that Japan had to adapt and incorporate some elements of Western-style industrialization into their own political and economic order as the necessary means to remain independent of Western imperialism. The Opium War in China, and later the Euro-American bombardments of the domain capitals in Choshu and Satsuma demonstrated that trying to defend the realm with only an increased emphasis on coastal defense would ultimately fail to keep (...)
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  • May One Murder the Innocent for the Sake of Faith in God or Filial Piety to Parents? A Comparative Study of Abraham’s and Guo’s Stories.Qingping Liu - 2017 - Asian Philosophy 27 (1):43-58.
    Through a comparative analysis of the stories of Abraham and Guo, this article tries to argue that some particularistic claims of Christianity and Confucianism, which regard faith in God or filial piety to parents respectively as the sole ultimate principle of human life, may constitute the spiritual mainstay of such serious evils as murdering the innocent in certain in-depth paradoxes. Only by assigning a supreme position to their universal ideas of loving all humans through their self-transformations could the two ethico-religious (...)
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  • A Revisionist Understanding of Zhang Zai's Development of Qi in the Context of His Critique of the Buddhist.Jung-Yeup Kim - 2010 - Asian Philosophy 20 (2):111-126.
    In a comprehensive survey of contemporary scholarship on Zhang Zai's (1020-1077) development of the notion qi ( 'vital energy') in the context of his critique of the Buddhist, I observe that there is a prevalent imposition of a Western concept, namely, 'substance monism', on his understanding of qi . It is assumed that he posits that 'the myriad things ( wanwu )' and 'the vast emptiness ( taixu )' are simultaneously differentiated and unified in that they are but different manifestations (...)
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  • José Mariátegui's East-South Decolonial Experiment.David Haekwon Kim - 2015 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (2):157-179.
    Common notions of comparative philosophy tend to be strongly configured by the East-West axis. This essay suggests ways of seeing Latin American liberation philosophy as a form of comparative philosophy and an important Latin American thinker as being relevant for East-West political philosophy. The essay focuses on the Peruvian activist and intellectual, José Mariátegui, who is widely regarded to have been a leading Marxist, liberatory, and decolonial figure in 20th century Latin America. Like many “Third World” intellectuals of the interwar (...)
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  • Spirit-of-This-World Encounters Spirit-of-Tragedy: Wang Guowei and Schopenhauer Through the Hermeneutical Lenses of Kierkegaard and Heidegger.David Jones & He Jinli - 2014 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 6 (1):68-83.
    China's encounter with Western cultures since the late Qing was generally viewed as a one-side “borrowing” and a radical “break” from traditional culture. “Westernization” became the dominant characteristic of the descriptions and interpretations of modern Chinese culture. Although Wang's work on comparative Chinese and Western philosophical studies has received much attention, there has been little attention given to the problem of Western influences, the domination of which, when appraising Wang's thought has persisted for a long time and has caused many (...)
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  • Han Fei's Enlightened Ruler.Alejandro Bárcenas - 2013 - Asian Philosophy 23 (3):236-259.
    In this essay I revise, based on the notion of the ‘enlightened ruler’ or mingzhu and his critique of the literati of his time, the common belief that Han Fei was an amoralist and an advocate of tyranny. Instead, I will argue that his writings are dedicated to advising those who ought to rule in order to achieve the goal of a peaceful and stable society framed by laws in accordance with the dao.
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  • The Ethical Stance of the “Qiwulun ”.Massimiliano Lacertosa - 2019 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 18 (2):183-196.
    This essay analyses the second chapter of the Zhuangzi 莊子, the “Qiwulun 齊物論.” After a brief examination of its main ideas, it will be argued that the “Qiwulun” needs to be considered not as an equalization that makes everything indistinguishable but as a discourse on corresponding things. A more attentive analysis of this correspondence among the myriad things will lead to the consideration of their mutual transformation. The conclusion is that, contrary to the ontotheological nature of Western metaphysics that imposes (...)
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  • Emotionales Versus Rationales: A Comparison Between Confucius’ and Socrates’ Ethics.Qingping Liu - 2013 - Asian Philosophy 23 (1):86-99.
    Socrates regards rational knowledge as the decisive factor of human life and even ascribes all virtues and moral actions to it, thereby stressing the ‘rationales’ of ethics. In contrast, Confucius regards kinship love as the decisive factor of human life and even grounds all virtues and moral actions on it, thereby stressing the ‘emotionales’ of ethics. Therefore, we should not lump them together by conceiving Confucius’ ethics also as based on ‘moral reason’.
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  • Knowing to Act in the Moment: Examples From Confucius ’Analects‘.Karyn L. Lai - 2012 - Asian Philosophy 22 (4):347-364.
    Many scholars note that the Analects, and Confucian philosophy more generally, hold a conception of knowing that more closely approximates ‘knowing-how’ than ‘knowing-that’. However, I argue that this description is not sufficiently sensitive to the concerns of the early Confucians and their focus on self-cultivation. I propose that a particular conception of knowing—knowing to act in the moment—is better suited to capturing the Analects’ emphasis on exemplary lives in actual contexts. These investigations might also contribute to discussions on know-how in (...)
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  • Two Versions of Desire-Based Subjectivism: A Comparative Study of the Analects and the Lotus Sutra.Wen Haiming - 2011 - Asian Philosophy 21 (4):419 - 435.
    In this paper, I discuss subjective desire and its subtle relationship with moral facts based on a comparative study of the Analects of Confucius and the Lotus Sutra. I pick out two points in this pair of classics in order to examine their ideas about accessing the highest wisdom: (1) the relationship between desire and Confucian ren, humanity, benevolence or virtue in the Analects, and (2) the role of learning and the ontological status of the mind and the world in (...)
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  • Confucian Democracy and Equality.Ranjoo Seodu Herr - 2010 - Asian Philosophy 20 (3):261-282.
    “Confucian democracy” is considered oxymoronic because Confucianism is viewed as lacking an idea of equality among persons necessary for democracy. Against this widespread opinion, this article argues that Confucianism presupposes a uniquely Confucian idea of equality and that therefore a Confucian conception of democracy distinct from liberal democracy is not only conceptually possible but also morally justifiable. This article engages philosophical traditions of East and West by, first, reconstructing the prevailing position based on Joshua Cohen’s political liberalism; second, articulating a (...)
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  • On 'Rectifying' Rectification: Reconsidering Zhengming in Light of Confucian Role Ethics.Sarah A. Mattice - 2010 - Asian Philosophy 20 (3):247-260.
    Both an emphasis on logic and an emphasis on rhetoric lead to a kind of care for language. However, in early Greece this care for language through the lens of logic manifested in the drive to ?get it right?, whereas in early China the care for language manifested in the pervasive concern for zhengming, for using names properly. For the early Chinese thinkers, especially the early Confucians, this was not predominantly a linguistic affair?zhengming is a key component of moral cultivation. (...)
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  • The Propriety of Confucius: A Sense-of-Ritual.Kurtis Hagen - 2010 - Asian Philosophy 20 (1):1 – 25.
    In the philosophy of Confucius, the concept _li_ is both central and elusive. While it is often translated 'ritual' or 'the rites,' I argue that there are numerous significant ways in which _li_ is as much an internal property of individuals as it is an external set of rules or norms. I discuss _li_ as deference, as developed dispositions, as embodied intelligence, and as personalized exemplary conduct. Finally, reflecting on the work of Fingarette, and Hall and Ames, as well as (...)
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  • To become a filial son, a loyal subject, or a humane person?—On the confucian ideas about humanity.Qingping Liu - 2009 - Asian Philosophy 19 (2):173 – 188.
    Confucius, Mencius, and Xunzi regard the human as an emotional being and especially consider such moral feelings as humane love, filial piety and devoted loyalty to be the constituent elements of humanity. On the one hand, they try to integrate the corresponding multiple roles of the humane person, filial son and loyal subject in harmony in order to make one become a true human in the ethical sense; on the other hand, they assign a supreme position merely to filial piety (...)
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  • The Limit of Language in Daoism.Koji Tanaka - 2004 - Asian Philosophy 14 (2):191 – 205.
    The paper is concerned with the development of the paradoxical theme of Daoism. Based on Chad Hansen's interpretation of Daoism and Chinese philosophy in general, it traces the history of Daoism by following their treatment of the limit of language. The Daoists seem to have noticed that there is a limit to what language can do and that the limit of language is paradoxical. The 'theoretical' treatment of the paradox of the limit of language matures as Daoism develops. Yet the (...)
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  • Confucius’ Junzi : The Conceptions of Self in Confucian.Jinhua Song & Xiaomin Jiao - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (13):1171-1179.
    Confucius reinvented the concept of Junzi (君子), an idea of personhood which invites continual assessment whether the concerns people were once devoted to are worthy of ongoing devotion, and how they make a place in the world—a place where they hope they can exercise some governance in their lives. Junzi (君子)is a agent, and has the properties and powers to monitor their lives, and to contribute to societal transformation. Cultivating a person is centrally involved in the politics of subjectivity, in (...)
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  • The Confucian View of the Relationship Between Knowledge and Action and Its Relevance to Action Research.Ching-Tien Tsai - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (13):1474-1486.
    There are marked similarities between Confucian ideas about the relationship between action, knowledge and learning, and contemporary educational thinking about action research. Examples can be seen in the relationship between action and research. First, Confucius emphasized the importance of ‘action’ which was different from ‘research’. The Confucian view of action implies that one should engage in a research process of deliberation in advance and then decide whether to take action or not. This kind of researched action is refined by the (...)
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  • Experience as Art.Sor‐Hoon Tan - 1999 - Asian Philosophy 9 (2):107 – 122.
    Chinese philosophy views experience as intrinsically aesthetic. This world view could be elucidated through a consideration of John Dewey's aesthetics and features of Chinese art. Dewey's philosophy of art starts with an understanding of experience as 'live processes' of living creatures interacting with their environment. Such processes are autopoietic in being self-sustaining, ever-changing, capable of increasing complexity, capable of generating novelty, direction and progress on its own. Its autopoietic character is a precondition of the aesthetic in the process of experience. (...)
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  • Social Morality and Social Misfits: Confucius, Hegel, and the Attack of Zhuangzi and Kierkegaard.Daniel M. Johnson - 2012 - Asian Philosophy 22 (4):365-374.
    There is a remarkable and surprising connection to be found between an argument of Søren Kierkegaard’s and one of Zhuangzi’s—what I call the ‘social misfit’ critique. I will argue that this connection highlights a hitherto unacknowledged parallel between the moral thought of their respective targets: Hegel in the case of Kierkegaard and Confucius in the case of Zhuangzi. Specifically, it reveals a significant parallel between Hegel’s movement from Moralitat to Sittlichkeit and Confucius’ position on the central and irreducible role of (...)
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  • Ritualized Exchange: A Consideration of Confucian Reciprocity.Eric C. Mullis - 2008 - Asian Philosophy 18 (1):35 – 50.
    In this essay I discuss reciprocity as it unfolds within the context of a Confucian relational ethic. I discuss the relationship between reciprocity and the virtue of shu or 'sympathetic understanding' and then go on to argue that the goods that grow out of reciprocal relationships are necessary for Confucian ethics. These include social equilibrium, a rich sense of self-esteem, and reliable expectations concerning the actions of others. Finally, I discuss the difficulties of acting reciprocally in socially disproportional relationships and (...)
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  • Confucian Democracy as Pragmatic Experiment: Uniting Love of Learning and Love of Antiquity.Sor-Hoon Tan - 2007 - Asian Philosophy 17 (2):141 – 166.
    This paper argues for the pragmatic construction of Confucian democracy by showing that Chinese philosophers who wish to see Confucianism flourish again as a positive dimension of Chinese civilization need to approach it pragmatically and democratically, otherwise their love of the past is at the expense of something else Confucius held in equal esteem, love of learning. Chinese philosophers who desire democracy for China would do well to learn from the earlier failures of the iconoclastic Westernizers, and realize that a (...)
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  • On Confucius' Principle of Consanguineous Affection: A Reading of the Dialogue About the Three-Year Mourning in the Lunyu.Qingping Liu - 2006 - Asian Philosophy 16 (3):173 – 188.
    In his dialogue with Zai Wo about the three-year mourning, Confucius establishes a principle of 'justification by feeling at ease,' and insists that one should transcend natural desires by moral emotions. More significantly, he further regards kinship love as the ultimate root and supreme principle of human life. Thus, this dialogue contains almost all the basic elements of the Confucian spirit of consanguineous affection.
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  • Reconstructing Chinese Metaphysics: Guest Editor's Introduction.Wen Haiming - 2011 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 43 (1):3-8.
    The five papers translated here were first presented at a conference titled Metaphysics and Epistemology in Chinese Philosophy: A Systematic and Comparative Approach, which met on July 10-11, 2010, under the co-sponsorship of the School of Philosophy and the International Center for Chinese and Comparative Philosophy, both at the Renmin University of China, and the Association of Chinese Philosophers in America. The selected papers represent three main approaches to Chinese metaphysics: a traditional textual approach ; an approach drawing on both (...)
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  • Dao, Harmony and Personhood: Towards a Confucian Ethics of Technology.Pak-Hang Wong - 2012 - Philosophy and Technology 25 (1):67-86.
    A closer look at the theories and questions in philosophy of technology and ethics of technology shows the absence and marginality of non-Western philosophical traditions in the discussions. Although, increasingly, some philosophers have sought to introduce non-Western philosophical traditions into the debates, there are few systematic attempts to construct and articulate general accounts of ethics and technology based on other philosophical traditions. This situation is understandable, for the questions of modern sciences and technologies appear to be originated from the West; (...)
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  • Observance of Forms: An Aesthetic Analysis of Analects 6.25.Tae-Seung Lim - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (2):147-162.
    This essay analyzes how the zhengming 正名 theory of Confucius is linked to the problem of “observances of form” in light of the methodology of Confucian aesthetics. This essay argues that the “name-shape” combination in the zhengming paradigm is ultimately connected with the “name-role” combination. The “name-shape” paradigm continuously maintains and strengthens the “name-role” paradigm. However, the “name-shape” paradigm itself ultimately becomes more meaningful than the “name-role” paradigm. This is because the aesthetic structure that appears peculiar in the Analects constitutes (...)
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  • Aristotle and Confucius on the Socioeconomics of Shame.Thorian R. Harris - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (3):323-342.
    The sociopolitical significance Aristotle and Confucius attribute to possessing a sense of shame serves to emphasize the importance of its development. Aristotle maintains that social class and wealth are prerequisites for its acquisition, while Confucius is optimistic that it can be developed regardless of socioeconomic considerations. The difference between their positions is largely due to competing views of praiseworthy dispositions. While Aristotle conceives of praiseworthy dispositions as “consistent” traits of character, traits that calcifiy as one reaches adulthood, Confucius offers us (...)
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  • Turns of the Dao.Robert Cummings Neville - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (4):499-510.
    Fifteen years after the publication of my assessment of comparative philosophy in the inaugural issue of Dao, this article comments on some of the major changes that have taken place in the field since Dao began. One of the most significant is the improvement in the conditions for Chinese philosophy in mainland China and the return of many of the original participants in Dao’s audience to positions in East Asia from earlier careers in the West. The article also surveys advances (...)
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  • Thinking Through Hall and Ames: On the Art of Comparative Philosophy.Warren G. Frisina - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (4):563-574.
    With the publication of their first collaborative book Thinking Through Confucius, David Hall and Roger Ames launched a comparative philosophical project juxtaposing American pragmatism and Chinese Confucianism. This essay focuses on the role pragmatic assumptions play in Hall’s and Ames’s announced goal of opening a “new route” into Chinese intellectual history. Hall and Ames aim to teach scholars whose scholarly sensibilities have been formed in the West what they must acknowledge about their own traditions before they can engage Chinese thinkers (...)
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  • Tian as Cosmos in Z Hu Xi’s Neo-Confucianism.Stephen C. Angle - 2018 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 17 (2):169-185.
    Tian 天 is central to the metaphysics, cosmology, and ethics of the 800-year-long Chinese philosophical tradition we call “Neo-Confucianism,” but there is considerable confusion over what tian means—confusion which is exacerbated by its standard translation into English as “Heaven.” This essay analyzes the meaning of tian in the works of the most influential Neo-Confucian, Zhu Xi 朱熹, presents a coherent interpretation that unifies the disparate aspects of the term’s meaning, and argues that “cosmos” does an excellent job of capturing this (...)
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  • On the Interpreter’s Choices: Making Hermeneutic Relativity Explicit.Lin Ma & Jaap van Brakel - 2018 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 17 (4):453-478.
    In this essay, we explore the various aspects of hermeneutic relativity that have rarely been explicitly discussed. Our notion of “hermeneutic relativity” can be seen as an extension, with significant revisions, of Gadamer’s notion of Vorurteil. It refers to various choices and constraints of the interpreter, including beliefs concerning the best way of doing philosophy, what criteria are to be used to evaluate competing interpretations, and so on. The interpreter cannot completely eliminate the guidance and constraint originating from his/her “background.” (...)
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  • The Emergence of the Notion of Predetermined Fate in Early China.Yunwoo Song - 2019 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 18 (4):509-529.
    This essay depicts the emergence of the notion of predetermined fate in early China by focusing on the changing meaning of the word ming 命. Many scholars have long interpreted the term ming in the Lunyu 論語 as a kind of inevitable fate, but I show that it is still subject to change depending on the will of an anthropomorphic Heaven. In the Warring States period, however, Heaven became increasingly conceived as following fixed patterns in its behavior, and the growing (...)
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  • Desperately Seeking ‘Justice’ in Classical Chinese: On the Meanings of Yi.Deborah Cao - 2019 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 32 (1):13-28.
    This essay sets out to search for an equivalent Chinese word to the English word ‘justice’ in classical Chinese language, through ancient Chinese philosophical texts, imperial codes and idioms. The study found that there does not seem to be a linguistic sign for ‘justice’ in classical Chinese, and further, yi resembles ‘justice’ in some ways and has been used sometimes to translate ‘justice’, but yi is a complex concept in traditional Chinese philosophy with multiple meanings and it is dissimilar to (...)
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  • Visibility and Invisibility of Animals in Traditional Chinese Philosophy and Law.Deborah Cao - 2011 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (3):351-367.
    There is yet to be any animal welfare or protection law for domestic animals in China, one of the few countries in the world today that do not have such laws. However, in Chinese imperial law, there were legal provisions adopted more than a 1,000 years ago for the care and treatment of domestic working animals. Furthermore, in traditional Chinese philosophy, animals were regarded as constituent part of the organic whole of the cosmos by ancient Chinese philosophers who saw no (...)
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  • Way of Post-Confucianism: Transformation and Genealogy. [REVIEW]Zhuoyue Huang - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (4):543-559.
    After Neo-Confucianism, the study of contemporary Confucianism became more diverse. Its original uniformity was replaced by diversity. During this time, however, Post-Confucianism became increasingly prominent. Post-Confucianism comes from a post-modernist context and was influenced by a post-modernist ideological mode, and so its appearance was inevitable. It was also closely linked to significant philosophical issues after the change in times, and therefore questioned and challenged Neo-Confucianism which was based on a pattern of modernity. Post-Confucianism represents a new trend in the contemporary (...)
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  • Confucius and Aristotle on the Goods of Friendship.Eric C. Mullis - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (4):391-405.
    This essay discusses the goods of friendship as they are articulated by Confucius, Mencius, and Aristotle. It is argued that since Confucius and Mencius tend to conceive personal relationships in hierarchical terms, they do not directly address the goods of symmetrical friendships. Using Aristotle ’s account of friendship, I argue that friendship is necessary for the cultivation of virtue outside the family. This is supported by discussing the virtues of generosity, trust, and wisdom as they develop within family life and (...)
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  • The Giant Forge and the Great Ironsmith: Revisiting the Implications of the Wu Xing Physics of the Zhongyong.Ronnie Littlejohn - 2004 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 3 (2):205-215.
  • Minds, Programs, and Chinese Philosophers: A Chinese Perspective on the Chinese Room.Koji Tanaka - 2004 - Sophia 43 (1):61-72.
    The paper is concerned with John Searle’s famous Chinese room argument. Despite being objected to by some, Searle’s Chinese room argument appears very appealing. This is because Searle’s argument is based on an intuition about the mind that ‘we’ all seem to share. Ironically, however, Chinese philosophers don’t seem to share this same intuition. The paper begins by first analysing Searle’s Chinee room argument. It then introduces what can be seen as the (implicit) Chinese view of the mind. Lastly, it (...)
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  • Way as Dao; Way as Halakha: Confucianism, Judaism, and Way Metaphors.Galia Patt-Shamir - 2005 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5 (1):137-158.
  • Do Not Take Confucians as Kantians: Comments on Liu Qingping’s Interpretation of Confucian Teachings.Peimin Ni - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (1):45-49.
    LIU Qingping’s criticism of Confucian teachings of filial piety, though valuable in stimulating critical attitude toward classic Confucianism, is largely based on misinterpreting Confucians as Kantians. The article tries to show that, unlike the Kantian rule-oriented ethic that provides universal ethical principles, Confucianism focuses on the process of person-making, and the teachings of classic Confucianism are more like gongfu instructions than moral principles. Looking from the gongfu perspective, Liu’s criticism becomes misdirected, if not irrelevant.
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  • Kierkegaard and Confucius: The Religious Dimensions of Ethical Selfhood.George B. Connell - 2009 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (2):133-149.
    To date, there have been few attempts to compare the thought of Confucius and Kierkegaard, and these few attempts have focused on the contrast between Kierkegaard’s stress on the individual and Confucius’s emphasis on the social aspect of human existence. In this article, I point instead to substantial agreement between the analyses of ethical existence offered by Confucius and two of Kierkegaard’s pseudonymous figures, Judge William of Either/Or and Johannes Climacus of The Concluding Unscientific Postscript . I seek to use (...)
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  • The Metaphysical Background to Early Confucian Ethics.Tim Connolly - 2019 - Philosophy Compass 14 (12).
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  • Observing Ritual “Proprietyli” as Focusing the “Familiar” in the Affairs of the Day.Roger T. Ames - 2002 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 1 (2):143-156.
  • Integrity as a Business Asset.Daryl Koehn - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 58 (1-3):125-136.
    . In this post-Enron era, we have heard much talk about the need for integrity. Today’s employees perceive it as being in short supply. A recent survey by the Walker Consulting Firm found that less than half of workers polled thought their senior leaders were people of high integrity. To combat the perceived lack of corporate integrity, companies are stressing their probity. This stress is problematic because executives tend to instrumentalize the value of integrity. This paper argues that integrity needs (...)
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  • Family Reverence ( Xiao) as the Source of Consummatory Conduct ( Ren 仁).Henry Rosemont & Roger T. Ames - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (1):9-19.