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John Stuart Mill on Liberty and Control

Princeton University Press (2001)

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  1. O etyce niezależnej Tadeusza Kotarbińskiego.Przemysław Spryszak - 2016 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 6 (2):429-454.
    In this paper I briefly discuss principles of “independent ethics” formulated and popularized by the Polish philosopher Tadeusz Kotarbiński. I focus on the notion of “conscience” which seems to play a fundamental role in this moral theory.
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  • John Stuart Mill, Innate Differences, and the Regulation of Reproduction.Diane B. Paul & Benjamin Day - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 39 (2):222-231.
    In this paper, we show that the question of the relative importance of innate characteristics and institutional arrangements in explaining human difference was vehemently contested in Britain during the first half of the nineteenth century. Thus Sir Francis Galton’s work of the 1860s should be seen as an intervention in a pre-existing controversy. The central figure in these earlier debates—as well as many later ones—was the philosopher and economist John Stuart Mill. In Mill’s view, human nature was fundamentally shaped by (...)
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  • On Liberty's Liberty.Carlos Rodríguez Braun - 2007 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 16 (2):12-28.
    Hailed as the most influential book ever written in favor of freedom, John Stuart Mill’s On Liberty is a contradictory and imprecise work. Mill’s notion of liberty coexists with anti-liberal ideas. He defended the private property of capitalists, but not of landowners. He criticized protectionism, but made an exception for infant industries. He defended competition, but set limits on it. He criticized general public education, but allowed the State to force citizens to study. He defended women and men’s freedom, but (...)
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