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  1. Japanese Sound-Symbolic Words for Representing the Hardness of an Object Are Judged Similarly by Japanese and English Speakers.Li Shan Wong, Jinhwan Kwon, Zane Zheng, Suzy J. Styles, Maki Sakamoto & Ryo Kitada - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Contrary to the assumption of arbitrariness in modern linguistics, sound symbolism, which is the non-arbitrary relationship between sounds and meanings, exists. Sound symbolism, including the “Bouba–Kiki” effect, implies the universality of such relationships; individuals from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds can similarly relate sound-symbolic words to referents, although the extent of these similarities remains to be fully understood. Here, we examined if subjects from different countries could similarly infer the surface texture properties from words that sound-symbolically represent hardness in Japanese. (...)
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  • The Link Between Auditory Salience and Emotion Intensity.Andrey Anikin - 2020 - Cognition and Emotion 34 (6):1246-1259.
    To ensure that listeners pay attention and do not habituate, emotionally intense vocalizations may be under evolutionary pressure to exploit processing biases in the auditory system by maximising t...
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