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  1. Foucault, Politics, and Violence.Corey McCall - 2013 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 5 (2):199-211.
    Oksala’s book is the latest in a series of attempts to examine Foucault’s work during the late 1970s. We can delineate two clear trends in recent Foucault scholarship on this period: the first trend provides analyses and evaluations of this period while asecond trend attempts to apply Foucault’s analyses of these key concepts to contemporary society. Oksala’s book attempts to do both, although if forced to choose one would have to place it more firmly in the first camp than the (...)
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  • Subjectivity, Reflection and Freedom in Later Foucault.Sacha Golob - 2015 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 23 (5):666-688.
    This paper proposes a new reading of the interaction between subjectivity, reflection and freedom within Foucault’s later work. I begin by introducing three approaches to subjectivity, locating these in relation both to Foucault’s texts and to the recent literature. I suggest that Foucault himself operates within what I call the ‘entanglement approach’, and, as such, he faces a potentially serious challenge, a challenge forcefully articulated by Han. Using Kant’s treatment of reflection as a point of comparison, I argue that Foucault (...)
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  • Subject of Conscience: On the Relation Between Freedom and Discrimination in the Thought of Heidegger, Foucault, and Butler.Aret Karademir - unknown
    Martin Heidegger was not only one of the greatest philosophers of the twentieth century but also a supporter of and a contributor to one of the most discriminatory ideologies of the recent past. Thus, "the Heidegger's case" gives us philosophers an opportunity to work on discrimination from a philosophical perspective. My aim in this essay is to question the relationship between freedom and discrimination via Heidegger's philosophy. I will show that what bridges the gap between Heidegger's philosophy and a discriminatory (...)
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  • Michel Foucault: Introduction to Kant’s Anthropology. Semiotext, Translated by Roberto Nigro and Kate Briggs. [REVIEW]Colin McQuillan - 2012 - Continental Philosophy Review 45 (4):579-585.
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  • Edward McGushin: Foucault’s Askesis: An Introduction to the Philosophical Life. [REVIEW]Corey McCall - 2010 - Continental Philosophy Review 42 (4):577-582.
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  • “As Close as Possible to the Unlivable”.Stéphane Legrand - 2008 - Sophia 47 (3):281-291.
    This article aims at showing that in spite of Michel Foucault’s violent rejection of phenomenology, this discipline never ceased to bear a crucial significance for his archaeological and genealogical analyses, in that it can be construed as a symptom indicating the most serious challenge that the contemporary philosophy has to meet: thinking together Experience and Knowledge. The author intends to prove, by resorting to the Marxian concept of ‘objectively necessary appearance’, that Foucault’s main opposition to phenomenology stems from his original (...)
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  • Michel Foucault and Judith Butler: Troubling Butler's Appropriation of Foucault's Work.Kathleen Ennis - unknown
    One of the main influences on Judith Butler‘s thinking has been the work of Michel Foucault. Although this relationship is often commented on, it is rarely discussed in any detail. My thesis makes a contribution in this area. It presents an analysis of Foucault‘s work with the aim of countering Butler‘s representation of his thinking. In the first part of the thesis, I show how Butler initially interprets Foucault‘s project through Nietzschean genealogy, psychoanalysis and Derridean discourse, and how she later (...)
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  • Agonies of the Real: Anti-Realism From Kuhn to Foucault.Peter E. Gordon - 2012 - Modern Intellectual History 9 (1):127-147.
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  • Anarchic Bodies: Foucault and the Feminist Question of Experience.Johanna Oksala - 2004 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 19 (4):99-121.
    The article shows that Michel Foucault's account of the sexual body is not a naive return to a prediscursive body, nor does it amount to discourse reductionism and to the exclusion of experience, as some feminists have argued. Instead, Foucault's idea of bodies and pleasures as a possibility of the counterattack against normalizing power presupposes an experiential understanding of the body. The experiential body can become a locus of resistance because it is the possibility of an unpredictable event.
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  • Bearing the Lightning of Possible Storms: Foucault’s Experimental Social Criticism. [REVIEW]Zach VanderVeen - 2010 - Continental Philosophy Review 43 (4):467-484.
    This paper argues that Michel Foucault explicitly rejected the model of critique by which he is often understood—by both his defenders and detractors. Rather than justifying norms that could be said to represent “the people;” judging institutions, norms, and practices accordingly; and creating programs for others to enact, he theorized and practiced an experimental social criticism in which specific intellectuals help people work through “intolerable” situations by multiplying the ways they can think about and act upon them. As Foucault’s work (...)
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  • Foucault’s Politicization of Ontology.Johanna Oksala - 2010 - Continental Philosophy Review 43 (4):445-466.
    The paper explicates a politicized conception of reality with the help of Michel Foucault’s critical project. I contend that Foucault’s genealogies of power problematize the relationship between ontology and politics. His idea of productive power incorporates a radical, ontological claim about the nature of reality: Reality as we know it is the result of social practices and struggles over truth and objectivity. Rather than translating the true ontology into the right politics, he reverses the argument. The radicality of his method (...)
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  • Foucault, Husserl and the Philosophical Roots of German Neoliberalism.Johanna Oksala - 2016 - Continental Philosophy Review 49 (1):115-126.
    The article investigates and vindicates the surprising claim Foucault makes in his lecture series The Birth of Biopolitics that the philosophical roots of post-war German neoliberalism lie in Husserl’s phenomenology. I study the similarities between Husserl’s phenomenology and Walter Eucken’s economic theory and examine the way that Husserl’s idea of the historical a priori assumes a determinate role in Eucken’s economic thinking. I also return to Foucault’s lectures in order to show how a version of the historical a priori continues (...)
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  • The Recovery Model: Discourse Ethics and the Retrieval of the Self. [REVIEW]Joseph A. Fardella - 2008 - Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (2):111-126.
    The recovery model, as applied in mental health, is significant because it intends to foster a critical retrieval by the subject of herself as a self-determining agent of change. This paper will show that the recovery model represents an approach to caring for the self that is congruent with critical themes inherent in some forms of contemporary philosophy, particularly that of Michel Foucault and Jurgen Habermas. The paper will also consider the contribution that Habermas’ discourse ethics could make towards the (...)
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  • Anarchic Bodies: Foucault and the Feminist Question of Experience.Johanna Oksala - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (4):97-119.
    : The article shows that Michel Foucault's account of the sexual body is not a naïve return to a prediscursive body, nor does it amount to discourse reductionism and to the exclusion of experience, as some feminists have argued. Instead, Foucault's idea of bodies and pleasures as a possibility of the counterattack against normalizing power presupposes an experiential understanding of the body. The experiential body can become a locus of resistance because it is the possibility of an unpredictable event.
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  • Sexual Experience: Foucault, Phenomenology, and Feminist Theory.Johanna Oksala - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (1):207-223.
    This paper explicates Foucault's conception of experience and defends it as an important theoretical resource for feminist theory. It analyzes Linda Alcoff's devastating critique of Foucault's account of sexuality and her reasons for advocating phenomenology as a more viable alternative. I agree with her that a philosophically sophisticated understanding of experience must remain central for feminist theory, but I demonstrate that her critique of Foucault is based on a mistaken view of his philosophical position as well as on a problematic (...)
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