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  1. The Architecture of Science and the Idea of a University.Sophie Forgan - 1989 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 20 (4):405.
  • John Dee’s Ideas and Plans for a National Research Institute.Nicholas H. Clulee - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (3):437-448.
    John Dee’s arrangements at his Mortlake house have received some attention as an English ‘academy’ or ‘experimental household.’ His ideas for St Cross, which he requested as a suitable living in 1592, have received less detailed attention. This paper examines Mortlake and his St Cross plans in detail and argues that, at their core, they shared an aspiration to create a national research institute. These plans are related to the context of Dee’s pursuit of royal patronage and his idea of (...)
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  • “In the Warehouse”: Privacy, Property and Priority in the Early Royal Society.Rob Iliffe - 1992 - History of Science 30 (87):29-68.
  • Jesuit Mathematical Science and the Reconstitution of Experience in the Early Seventeenth Century.Peter Dear - 1987 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 18 (2):133.
  • On Scientific Instruments: Introduction to Issue 4.Liba Taub - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (4):337-343.
  • Astronomers Mark Time: Discipline and the Personal Equation.Simon Schaffer - 1988 - Science in Context 2 (1):115-145.
  • Graphic Understanding: Instruments and Interpretation in Robert Hooke's Micrographia.Michael Aaron Dennis - 1989 - Science in Context 3 (2):309-364.
  • A Place of Knowledge Re-Created: The Library of Michel de Montaigne.Adi Ophir - 1991 - Science in Context 4 (1):163-190.
  • “The Mind Is Its Own Place”: Science and Solitude in Seventeenth-Century England.Steven Shapin - 1991 - Science in Context 4 (1):191-218.
  • The Place of Knowledge A Methodological Survey.Adi Ophir & Steven Shapin - 1991 - Science in Context 4 (1):3-22.
  • The Crystallization of a New Narrative Form in Experimental Reports.Christian Licoppe - 1994 - Science in Context 7 (2):205-244.
  • Making a Meal of the Big Dish: The Construction of the Jodrell Bank Mark 1 Radio Telescope as a Stable Edifice, 1946–57.Jon Agar - 1994 - British Journal for the History of Science 27 (1):3-21.
    From a distance the Mark 1 radio telescope at Jodrell Bank is an edifying sight. It is a steel structure of over 1000 tons, holding aloft a fully steerable dish of wire mesh which focuses incoming radio waves from astronomical objects. It is set in gently rolling Cheshire countryside. Its striking appearance can easily be recruited as a powerful symbol of progress and of science as the pursuit of pioneering spirits.
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  • Performance Practice: Music, Medicine and Natural Philosophy in Interregnum Oxford.Penelope Gouk - 1996 - British Journal for the History of Science 29 (3):257-288.
    A generation or so ago, scholarly discussion about the creation of new scientific knowledge in seventeenth-century England was often framed in terms of the respective contributions of scholars and practitioners, the effects of their training and background, the relative importance of the universities compared with London, and of the role of external and internal factors, and so forth. These discourses have now largely been put aside in favour of those emphasizing spatial metaphors and models, which are recognized as powerful conceptual (...)
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  • Instrumental Images: The Visual Rhetoric of Self-Presentation in Hevelius's Machina Coelestis.Janet Vertesi - 2010 - British Journal for the History of Science 43 (2):209-243.
    This article places the famous images of Johannes Hevelius's instruments in his Machina Coelestis in the context of Hevelius's contested cometary observations and his debate with Hooke over telescopic sights. Seen thus, the images promote a crafted vision of Hevelius's astronomical practice and skills, constituting a careful self-presentation to his distant professional network and a claim as to which instrumental techniques guarantee accurate observations. Reviewing the reception of the images, the article explores how visual rhetoric may be invoked and challenged (...)
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  • States of Secrecy: An Introduction.Koen Vermeir & Dániel Margócsy - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Science 45 (2):153-164.
    This introductory article provides an overview of the historiography of scientific secrecy from J.D. Bernal and Robert Merton to this day. It reviews how historians and sociologists of science have explored the role of secrets in commercial and government-sponsored scientific research through the ages. Whether focusing on the medieval, early modern or modern periods, much of this historiography has conceptualized scientific secrets as valuable intellectual property that helps entrepreneurs and autocratic governments gain economic or military advantage over competitors. Following Georg (...)
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  • The Einstein Tower: An Intertexture of Dynamic Construction, Relativity Theory, and Astronomy.Robert W. Smith - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 33 (3):591-599.
  • The Pasteurization of France.Simon Schaffer - 1991 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 22 (1):174-192.
  • Axioms, Essences, and Mostly Clean Hands: Preparing to Teach Chemistry with Libavius and Aristotle.Bruce T. Moran - 2006 - Science & Education 15 (2-4):173-187.
  • Place and Practice in Field Biology.Robert E. Kohler - 2002 - History of Science 40 (2):189-210.
  • Recent Books on the History of Museums.Ronald Rainger - 1995 - Biology and Philosophy 10 (2):235-248.
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  • A Place That Answers Questions: Primatological Field Sites and the Making of Authentic Observations.Amanda Rees - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 37 (2):311-333.
    The ideals and realities of field research have shaped the development of behavioural primatology over the latter half of the twentieth century. This paper draws on interviews with primatologists as well as a survey of the scientific literature to examine the idealized notion of the field site as a natural place and the physical environment of the field as a research space. It shows that what became standard field practice emerged in the course of wide ranging debate about the techniques, (...)
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  • A Place That Answers Questions: Primatological Field Sites and the Making of Authentic Observations.Amanda Rees - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (2):311-333.
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  • Life in the Liquid Fields: Kepler, Tycho and Gilbert on the Nature of the Heavens and Earth.Patrick J. Boner - 2008 - History of Science 46 (3):275-297.
  • The History of Science and the History of Microscopy.Ann La Berge - 1999 - Perspectives on Science 7 (1):111-142.
  • The History of Science and the History of Microscopy.Ann Elizabeth Fowler La Berge - 1999 - Perspectives on Science 7 (1):111-142.
  • Why New Hybrid Organizations Are Formed: Historical Perspectives on Epistemic and Academic Drift.Thomas Kaiserfeld - 2013 - Minerva 51 (2):171-194.
    By comparing three types of hybrid organizations—18th-century scientific academies, 19th-century institutions of higher vocational education, and 20th-century industrial research institutes—it is the purpose here to answer the question of why new hybrid organizations are continuously formed. Traditionally, and often implicitly, it is often assumed that emerging groups of potential knowledge users have their own organizational preferences and demands influencing the setup of new hybrid organizations. By applying the concepts epistemic and academic drift, it will be argued here, however, that internal (...)
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