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  1. Autism, Neurodiversity, and Equality Beyond the "Normal".Andrew Fenton & Tim Krahn - 2007 - Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 2 (2):2.
    “Neurodiversity” is associated with the struggle for the civil rights of all those diagnosed with neurological or neurodevelopmental disorders. Two basic approaches in the struggle for what might be described as “neuro-equality” are taken up in the literature: There is a challenge to current nosology that pathologizes all of the phenotypes associated with neurological or neurodevelopmental disorders ); there is a challenge to those extant social institutions that either expressly or inadvertently model a social hierarchy where the interests or needs (...)
     
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  • Enactivism, Other Minds, and Mental Disorders.Joel Krueger - 2019 - Synthese 198 (Suppl 1):365-389.
    Although enactive approaches to cognition vary in terms of their character and scope, all endorse several core claims. The first is that cognition is tied to action. The second is that cognition is composed of more than just in-the-head processes; cognitive activities are externalized via features of our embodiment and in our ecological dealings with the people and things around us. I appeal to these two enactive claims to consider a view called “direct social perception” : the idea that we (...)
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  • Individual Differences in (Non-Visual) Processing Style Predict the Face Inversion Effect.Natalie A. Wyer, Douglas Martin, Tracey Pickup & C. Neil Macrae - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (2):373-384.
    Recent research suggests that individuals with relatively weak global precedence (i.e., a smaller propensity to view visual stimuli in a configural manner) show a reduced face inversion effect (FIE). Coupled with such findings, a number of recent studies have demonstrated links between an advantage for feature-based processing and the presentation of traits associated with autism among the general population. The present study sought to bridge these findings by investigating whether a relationship exists between the possession of autism-associated traits (i.e., as (...)
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  • Verbal and Figural Creativity in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder and Typical Development.Anat Kasirer, Esther Adi-Japha & Nira Mashal - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  • A Tendency Towards Details? Inconsistent Results on Auditory and Visual Local-To-Global Processing in Absolute Pitch Musicians.Teresa Wenhart & Eckart Altenmüller - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • Analogical Reasoning in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: Evidence From an Eye-Tracking Approach.Enda Tan, Xueyuan Wu, Tracy Nishida, Dan Huang, Zhe Chen & Li Yi - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • The Impact of Multisensory Integration Deficits on Speech Perception in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.Ryan A. Stevenson, Magali Segers, Susanne Ferber, Morgan D. Barense & Mark T. Wallace - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  • Conjunctive Visual Processing Appears Abnormal in Autism.Ryan A. Stevenson, Aviva Philipp-Muller, Naomi Hazlett, Ze Y. Wang, Jessica Luk, Jong Lee, Karen R. Black, Lok-Kin Yeung, Fakhri Shafai, Magali Segers, Susanne Feber & Morgan D. Barense - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Semantic-Pragmatic Impairment in the Narratives of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders.Naama Kenan, Ditza A. Zachor, Linda R. Watson & Esther Ben-Itzchak - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • Animal Foraging and the Evolution of Goal‐Directed Cognition.Thomas T. Hills - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (1):3-41.
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  • Local and Global Processing: Observations From a Remote Culture.Jules Davidoff, Elisabeth Fonteneau & Joel Fagot - 2008 - Cognition 108 (3):702-709.
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  • Calendrical Savants: Exceptionality and Practice.Richard Cowan & Daniel P. J. Carney - 2006 - Cognition 100 (2):B1-B9.
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  • Typical Integration of Emotion Cues From Bodies and Faces in Autism Spectrum Disorder.Rebecca Brewer, Federica Biotti, Geoffrey Bird & Richard Cook - 2017 - Cognition 165:82-87.
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  • Guarding Against Over-Inclusive Notions of “Context”: Psycholinguistic and Electrophysiological Studies of Specific Context Functions in Schizophrenia.Debra Titone & J. Bruno Debruille - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):108-109.
    Phillips & Silverstein offer an exciting synthesis of ongoing efforts to link the clinical and cognitive manifestations of schizophrenia with cellular accounts of its pathophysiology. We applaud their efforts but wonder whether the highly inclusive notion of “context” adequately captures some important details regarding schizophrenia and NMDA/glutamate function that are suggested by work on language processing and cognitive electrophysiology.
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  • Setting Domain Boundaries for Convergence of Biological and Psychological Perspectives on Cognitive Coordination in Schizophrenia.J. P. Ginsberg - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):88-89.
    The claim that the disorganized subtype of schizophrenia results from glutamate hypofunction is enhanced by consideration of current subtypology of schizophrenia, symptom definition, interdependence of neurotransmitters, and the nature of the data needed to support the hypothesis. Careful specification clarifies the clinical reality of disorganization as a feature of schizophrenia and increases the utility of the subtype.
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  • Individual Differences in (Non‐Visual) Processing Style Predict the Face Inversion Effect.Natalie A. Wyer, Douglas Martin, Tracey Pickup & C. Neil Macrae - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (2):373-384.
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  • Intentions Vs. Resemblance: Understanding Pictures in Typical Development and Autism.Calum Hartley & Melissa L. Allen - 2014 - Cognition 131 (1):44-59.
  • Auditory Local Bias and Reduced Global Interference in Autism.Lucie Bouvet, Andrée-Anne Simard-Meilleur, Adeline Paignon, Laurent Mottron & Sophie Donnadieu - 2014 - Cognition 131 (3):367-372.
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  • NMDA Synapses Can Bias Competition Between Object Representations and Mediate Attentional Selection.Antonino Raffone, Jaap M. J. Murre & Gezinus Wolters - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):100-101.
    Phillips & Silverstein emphasize the gain-control properties of NMDA synapses in cognitive coordination. We endorse their view and suggest that NMDA synapses play a crucial role in biased attentional competition and (visual) working memory. Our simulations show that NMDA synapses can control the storage rate of visual objects. We discuss specific predictions of our model about cognitive effects of NMDA-antagonists and schizophrenia.
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  • Linking Brain to Mind in Normal Behavior and Schizophrenia.Stephen Grossberg - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):90-90.
    To understand schizophrenia, a linking hypothesis is needed that shows how brain mechanisms lead to behavioral functions in normals, and also how breakdowns in these mechanisms lead to behavioral symptoms of schizophrenia. Such a linking hypothesis is now available that complements the discussion offered by Phillips & Silverstein (P&S).
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  • The Extreme Male Brain Theory of Autism and the Potential Adverse Effects for Boys and Girls with Autism.Timothy M. Krahn & Andrew Fenton - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):93-103.
    Autism, typically described as a spectrum neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairments in verbal ability and social reciprocity as well as obsessive or repetitious behaviours, is currently thought to markedly affect more males than females. Not surprisingly, this encourages a gendered understanding of the Autism Spectrum. Simon Baron-Cohen, a prominent authority in the field of autism research, characterizes the male brain type as biased toward systemizing. In contrast, the female brain type is understood to be biased toward empathizing. Since persons with (...)
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  • What Neurodevelopmental Disorders Can Reveal About Cognitive Architecture.Helen Tager-Flusberg - 2005 - In Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Stephen P. Stich (eds.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. Oxford University Press. pp. 272--288.
    This chapter begins with an overview of the controversy surrounding the study of children and adults with neurodevelopmental disorders, and how these inform theories of neurocognitive architecture. It weighs the arguments for and against what we might learn from studying individuals who have fundamental biological impairments. It then discusses the example of research on theory of mind in two different disorders — autism and Williams syndrome — which has highlighted a number of important aspects of how this core cognitive capacity (...)
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  • Natural Kinds, Normative Kinds and Human Behavior.Diana Ines Pérez & Lucia Gabriela Ciccia - 2019 - Filosofia Unisinos 20 (3).
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  • Egocentrism, Allocentrism, and Asperger Syndrome.Uta Frith & Frederique de Vignemont - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (4):719-738.
    In this paper, we attempt to make a distinction between egocentrism and allocentrism in social cognition, based on the distinction that is made in visuo-spatial perception. We propose that it makes a difference to mentalizing whether the other person can be understood using an egocentric (‘‘you'') or an allocentric (‘‘he/ she/they'') stance. Within an egocentric stance, the other person is represented in relation to the self. By contrast, within an allocentric stance, the existence or mental state of the other person (...)
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  • Rapid Visual-Motion Integration Deficit in Autism.Bruno Gepner & Daniel Mestre - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (11):455.
    We propose here that a visual-motion integration deficit constitutes a crucial neuropsychological marker for at least a subgroup of ASD.
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  • Chaotic Itinerancy is a Key to Mental Diversity.Ichiro Tsuda - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):586-587.
    Kampis proposes the study of chaotic itinerancy, pointing out its significance in domains of cognitive science and philosophy. He has discovered in the concept of chaotic itinerancy the possibility for a new dynamical approach that elucidates mental states with a physical basis. This approach may therefore provide the means to go beyond the connectionist approach. In accordance with his theory, I here highlight three issues regarding chaotic itinerancy: transitory dynamics, diversity, and self-modifying system.
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  • Convergence of Biological and Psychological Perspectives on Cognitive Coordination in Schizophrenia.William A. Phillips & Steven M. Silverstein - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):65-82.
    The concept of locally specialized functions dominates research on higher brain function and its disorders. Locally specialized functions must be complemented by processes that coordinate those functions, however, and impairment of coordinating processes may be central to some psychotic conditions. Evidence for processes that coordinate activity is provided by neurobiological and psychological studies of contextual disambiguation and dynamic grouping. Mechanisms by which this important class of cognitive functions could be achieved include those long-range connections within and between cortical regions that (...)
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  • Synchronous Dynamics for Cognitive Coordination: But How?M.-A. Tagamets & Barry Horwitz - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):106-107.
    Although interesting, the hypotheses proposed by Phillips & Silverstein lack unifying structure both in specific mechanisms and in cited evidence. They provide little to support the notion that low-level sensory processing and high-level cognitive coordination share dynamic grouping by synchrony as a common processing mechanism. We suggest that more realistic large-scale modeling at multiple levels is needed to address these issues.
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  • Rationality, Diagnosis and Patient Autonomy.Jillian Craigie & Lisa Bortolotti - 2014 - Oxford Handbook Psychiatric Ethics.
    In this chapter, our focus is the role played by notions of rationality in the diagnosis of mental disorders, and in the practice of overriding patient autonomy in psychiatry. We describe and evaluate different hypotheses concerning the relationship between rationality and diagnosis, raising questions about what features underpin psychiatric categories. These questions reinforce widely held concerns about the use of diagnosis as a justification for overriding autonomy, which have motivated a shift to mental incapacity as an alternative justification. However, this (...)
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  • Inference From Academic Texts in Children with Autism.Elisabeth Engberg-Pedersen - 2018 - Pragmatics Cognition 25 (2):363-383.
    Children and adults with autism do worse on tests of inferences than controls. This fact has been attributed to poor language skills, a tendency to focus on detail, and poor social understanding. This study examines whether children with autism with age-appropriate language and cognitive skills have difficulties drawing inferences from academic, expository texts. Sixteen children with autism and a control group of twenty-four children were matched on language skills, nonverbal cognitive ability, and auditory and nonverbal working memory and compared on (...)
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  • Why Neuroscience Matters to Cognitive Neuropsychology.Victoria McGeer - 2007 - Synthese 159 (3):347 - 371.
    The broad issue in this paper is the relationship between cognitive psychology and neuroscience. That issue arises particularly sharply for cognitive neurospsychology, some of whose practitioners claim a methodological autonomy for their discipline. They hold that behavioural data from neuropsychological impairments are sufficient to justify assumptions about the underlying modular structure of human cognitive architecture, as well as to make inferences about its various components. But this claim to methodological autonomy can be challenged on both philosophical and empirical grounds. A (...)
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  • Autistic Children Show a Surprising Relationship Between Global Visual Perception, Non-Verbal Intelligence and Visual Parvocellular Function, Not Seen in Typically Developing Children.Alyse C. Brown & David P. Crewther - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
  • What is Specific to Music Processing? Insights From Congenital Amusia.Isabelle Peretz & Krista L. Hyde - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (8):362-367.
  • Autism and Coherence: A Computational Model.Claire O'Laughlin & Paul Thagard - 2000 - Mind and Language 15 (4):375–392.
  • Visual Illusions: An Interesting Tool to Investigate Developmental Dyslexia and Autism Spectrum Disorder.Simone Gori, Massimo Molteni & Andrea Facoetti - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  • Autism and ‘Disease’: The Semantics of an Ill-Posed Question.Christopher Mole - 2017 - Philosophical Psychology 30 (8):1126-1140.
    It often seems incorrect to say that psychiatric conditions are diseases, and equally incorrect to say that they are not. This results in what would seem to be an unsatisfactory stalemate. The present essay examines the considerations that have brought us to such a stalemate in our discussions of autism. It argues that the stalemate in this particular case is a reflection of the fact that we need to find the logical space for a position that rejects both positive and (...)
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  • Development of Theory of Mind and Executive Control.Josef Perner & Birgit Lang - 1999 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (9):337-344.
  • High-Frequency Synchronisation in Schizophrenia: Too Much or Too Little?Leanne M. Williams, Kwang-Hyuk Lee, Albert Haig & Evian Gordon - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):109-110.
    Phillips & Silverstein's focus on schizophrenia as a failure of “cognitive coordination” is welcome. They note that a simple hypothesis of reduced Gamma synchronisation subserving impaired coordination does not fully account for recent observations. We suggest that schizophrenia reflects a dynamic compensation to a core deficit of coordination, expressed either as hyper- or hyposynchronisation, with neurotransmitter systems and arousal as modulatory mechanisms.
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  • Combating Fuzziness with Computational Modeling.L. M. Talamini, M. Meeter & J. M. J. Murre - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):107-108.
    Phillips & Silverstein's ambitious link between receptor abnormalities and the symptoms of schizophrenia involves a certain amount of fuzziness: No detailed mechanism is suggested through which the proposed abnormality would lead to psychological traits. We propose that detailed simulation of brain regions, using model neural networks, can aid in understanding the relation between biological abnormality and psychological dysfunction in schizophrenia.
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  • Cortical Connectivity in High-Frequency Beta-Rhythm in Schizophrenics with Positive and Negative Symptoms.Valeria Strelets - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):105-106.
    In chronic schizophrenic patients with both positive and negative symptoms (see Table 1), interhemispheric connections at the high frequency beta2-rhythm are absent during cognitive tasks, in contrast to normal controls, who have many interhemispheric connections at this frequency in the same situation. Connectivity is a fundamental brain feature, evidently greatly promoted by the NMDA system. It is a more reliable measure of brain function than the spectral power of this rhythm.
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  • Phenomenology, Context, and Self-Experience in Schizophrenia.Louis A. Sass & Peter J. Uhlhaas - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):104-105.
    Impairments in cognitive coordination in schizophrenia are supported by phenomenological data that suggest deficits in the processing of visual context. Although the target article is sympathetic to such a phenomenological perspective, we argue that the relevance of phenomenological data for a wider understanding of consciousness in schizophrenia is not sufficiently addressed by the authors.
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  • No Blind Schizophrenics: Are NMDA-Receptor Dynamics Involved?Glenn S. Sanders, Steven M. Platek & Gordon G. Gallup - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):103-104.
    Numerous searches have failed to identify a single co-occurrence of total blindness and schizophrenia. Evidence that blindness causes loss of certain NMDA-receptor functions is balanced by reports of compensatory gains. Connections between visual and anterior cingulate NMDA-receptor systems may help to explain how blindness could protect against schizophrenia.
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  • Why Do Schizophrenic Patients Hallucinate?Pieter R. Roelfsema & Hans Supèr - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):101-103.
    Phillips & Silverstein argue that schizophrenia is a result of a deficit of the contextual coordination of neuronal responses. The authors propose that NMDA-receptors control these modulatory effects. However, hallucinations, which are among the principle symptoms of schizophrenia, imply a flaw in the interactions between neurons that is more fundamental than just a general weakness of contextual modulation.
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  • Inferring Contextual Field Interactions From Scalp EEG.Mark E. Pflieger - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):99-100.
    This commentary highlights methods for using scalp EEG to make inferences about contextual field interactions, which, in view of the target article, may be specially relevant to the study of schizophrenia. Although scalp EEG has limited spatial resolution, prior knowledge combined with experimental manipulations may be used to strengthen inferences about underlying brain processes. Both spatial and temporal context are discussed within the framework of nonlinear interactions. Finally, results from a visual contour integration EEG pilot study are summarized in view (...)
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  • Schizophrenia: Putting Context in Context.Sohee Park, Junghee Lee, Bradley Folley & Jejoong Kim - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):98-99.
    Although context-processing deficits may be core features of schizophrenia, context remains a poorly defined concept. To test Phillips & Silverstein's model, we need to operationalize context more precisely. We offer several useful ways of framing context and discuss enhancing or facilitating schizophrenic patients' performance under different contextual situations. Furthermore, creativity may be a byproduct of cognitive uncoordination.
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  • Context, Connection, and Coordination: The Need to Switch.Robert D. Oades, Bernd Röpcke & Ljubov Oknina - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):97-97.
    Context, connection, and coordination (CCC) describe well where the problems that apply to thought-disordered patients with schizophrenia lie. But they may be part of the experience of those with other symptom constellations. Switching is an important mechanism to allow context to be applied appropriately to changing circumstances. In some cases, NMDA-voltage modulations may be central, but gain and shift are also functions that monoaminergic systems express in CCC.
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  • Reconciling Schizophrenic Deficits in Top-Down and Bottom-Up Processes: Not Yet.Angus W. MacDonald - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):96-96.
    This commentary challenges the authors to use their computational modeling techniques to support one of their central claims: that schizophrenic deficits in bottom-up (Gestalt-type tasks) and top-down (cognitive control tasks) context processing tasks arise from the same dysfunction. Further clarification about the limits of cognitive coordination would also strengthen the hypothesis.
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  • Theory of Mind in Schizophrenia: Damaged Module or Deficit in Cognitive Coordination?David Leiser & Udi Bonshtein - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):95-96.
    Schizophrenics exhibit a deficit in theory of mind (ToM), but an intact theory of biology (ToB). One explanation is that ToM relies on an independent module that is selectively damaged. Phillips & Silverstein's analyses suggest an alternative: ToM requires the type of coordination that is impaired in schizophrenia, whereas ToB is spared because this type of coordination is not involved.
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  • Is Sensory Gating a Form of Cognitive Coordination?Michael A. Kisley & Deana B. Davalos - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):94-95.
    Neurophysiological investigations of the past two decades have consistently demonstrated a deficit in sensory gating associated with schizophrenia. Phillips & Silverstein interpret this impairment as being consistent with cognitive coordination dysfunction. However, the physiological mechanisms that underlie sensory gating have not been shown to involve gamma-band oscillations or NMDA-receptors, both of which are critical neural elements in the cognitive coordination model.
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  • Peeling the Onion: NMDA Dysfunction as a Unifying Model in Schizophrenia.Daniel C. Javitt - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):93-94.
    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) dysfunction plays a crucial role in schizophrenia, leading to impairments in cognitive coordination. NMDAR agonists (e.g., glycine) ameliorate negative and cognitive symptoms, consistent with NMDAR models. However, not all types of cognitive coordination use NMDAR. Further, not all aspects of cognitive coordination are impaired in schizophrenia, suggesting the need for specificity in applying the cognitive coordination construct.
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