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Bodily Disorientation and Moral Change

Hypatia 27 (2):261-280 (2012)

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  1. The Problems of Access: A Crip Rejoinder Via the Phenomenology of Spatial Belonging.Corinne Lajoie - 2022 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 8 (2):318-337.
    This essay denaturalizes the taken-for-granted meaning of ‘access’ and interrogates its role and lived meaning in ableist social worlds, with a focus on spaces of higher education. I suggest that legalistic approaches to access need ‘cripping’ by a disability framework. Currently, these approaches miss the intersubjective sociality of being-in-the-world; they prioritize a narrow conception of access focused on ‘physical’ access and ‘physical’ space ; they approach access as frozen in time, rather than as a relational and temporally dynamic process ; (...)
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  • Being at Home: A Feminist Phenomenology of Disorientation in Illness.Corinne Lajoie - 2019 - Hypatia 34 (3):546-569.
    This article explores the relation among illness, home, and belonging. Through a feminist phenomenological framework, I describe the disorientations of being diagnosed with borderline personality disorder and living with mental illness. This research anticipates the consequences of illness and serious disorientations for a conception of belonging as seamless body–world compatibility. Instead, this article examines how the stability of bodily dwellings in experiences of disorientation can suggest ways of being in the world that are more attentive to interdependency, unpredictability, and change (...)
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  • Mentorship in Method: Philosophy and Experienced Agency.Ami Harbin - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (2):476-492.
    Against the background of the exclusion of many feminist methodologies from mainstream philosophy, and in light of the methodological challenges of providing accounts of experience responsive to the lives of agents, in this paper I return to early feminist philosophers of emotion to highlight how they anticipate and respond to methodological criticisms. Sue Campbell (1956–2011) was one philosopher who used methodological quandaries to strengthen her account of the formation and expression of feelings (Campbell ). By rereading selected texts together intentionally (...)
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  • Implicit Knowledge: How It is Understood and Used in Feminist Theory.Alexis Shotwell - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (5):315-324.
    Feminist theorists have crafted diverse accounts of implicit knowing that exceed the purview of epistemology conventionally understood. I characterize this field as through examining thematic clusters of feminist work on implicit knowledge: phenomenological and foucauldian theories of embodiment; theories of affect and emotion; other forms of implicit knowledge. Within these areas, the umbrella concept of implicit knowledge (or understanding, depending on how it's framed) names either contingently unspoken or fundamentally nonpropositional but epistemically salient content in our experience. I make a (...)
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  • Discomfort, Judgment, and Health Care for Queers.Ami Harbin, Brenda Beagan & Lisa Goldberg - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (2):149-160.
    This paper draws on findings from qualitative interviews with queer and trans patients and with physicians providing care to queer and trans patients in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, to explore how routine practices of health care can perpetuate or challenge the marginalization of queers. One of the most common “measures” of improved cultural competence in health care practice is self-reported increases in confidence and comfort, though it seems unlikely that an increase in physician comfort levels with queer and trans patients (...)
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  • First-Personal Body Aesthetics as Affirmations of Subjectivity.Madeline Martin-Seaver - 2019 - Contemporary Aesthetics 17.
    This paper redirects some of the philosophical discussion of sexual objectification. Rather than contributing further to debates over what constitutes objectification and whether it is harmful, I argue that aesthetic experience is a useful tool for resisting objectification. Attending to our embodied experiences provides immediate evidence that we are subjects; aesthetically attending to that evidence is a way of valuing it. I consider the human body as an aesthetic site, then as an ethico-aesthetic site, and finally as a site of (...)
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  • Responsibility for Collective Inaction and the Knowledge Condition.Michael D. Doan - 2016 - Social Epistemology 30 (5-6):532-554.
    When confronted with especially complex ecological and social problems such as climate change, how are we to think about responsibility for collective inaction? Social and political philosophers have begun to consider the complexities of acting collectively with a view to creating more just and sustainable societies. Some have recently turned their attention to the question of whether more or less formally organized groups can ever be held morally responsible for not acting collectively, or else for not organizing themselves into groups (...)
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  • Inducing Fear.Ami Harbin - 2020 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 23 (3-4):501-513.
    This paper offers an ethical consideration of how fear can be a tool of agents, used to deliberately shift people away from existing beliefs, commitments, or habits, or towards new ones. It contends that properly understanding the ethical dimensions of such uses of fear depends in part on a clear understanding of the dynamics of disorientation that can be involved in such uses. Section two begins with a clarification of the connections between fear, orientation, and disorientation. It suggests that experiences (...)
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  • Disorientation and the Medicalization of Struggle.Ami Harbin - 2014 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 7 (1):99.
    As a text in use by mental health practitioners, policy makers, and ordinary individuals, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) categorizes a variety of mental, psychological, and emotional experiences on a wide spectrum of disorders. Many common experiences are described there as symptoms, chiefly for the purposes of identifying, diagnosing, and treating disorders. “Disorientations” are not (yet) categorized as a stand-alone disorder in the DSM, but involve a cluster of experiences that border on and overlap with experiences (...)
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  • The Dynamic and Recursive Interplay of Embodiment and Narrative Identity.Roy Dings - 2018 - Philosophical Psychology 32 (2):186-210.
  • Embodiment and Vulnerability in Fichte and Hegel.Jane Dryden - 2013 - Dialogue 52 (1):109-128.
    This article uses Fichte and Hegel to explore the argument that vulnerability is valuable because it is what we all share as embodied beings in the world, and thus contributes to our connection with others. Further, recognition of one’s own vulnerability promotes self-knowledge. Their philosophies are then contrasted to show that Fichte’s system leads him to the attempt to overcome and control vulnerability, whereas Hegel’s describes an interplay of freedom and determination that allows us to be reconciled to our vulnerable, (...)
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