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  1. Popular Pūjas in Public Places: Lay Rituals in South Indian Temples. [REVIEW]Sita Anantha Raman - 2001 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 5 (2):165-198.
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  • U. Vē. Cāminātaiyar and the Construction of Tamil Literary “Tradition”.Anne E. Monius - 2011 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (6):589-597.
    U. Vē. Cāminātaiyar (1885–1942) is arguably one of the most influential figures of the so-called “Tamil Renaissance” of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; his work has profoundly shaped the study of Tamil literature, both in India and the Euro-American academy, for more than a century. Among his many literary works is a long and incomplete autobiographical treatise known as Eṉ Carittiram , literally “My Life Story,” initially published in 122 installments between 1940 and 1942. What little scholarly attention this (...)
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  • The Ins and Outs of the Jains in Tamil Literary Histories.Christoph Emmrich - 2011 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (6):599-646.
    The Jains and their texts play a key role in the literary histories of the Tamil-speaking region. However, in their modern form, dating from 1856 to the present, these histories have been written almost exclusively by non-Jains. Driving their efforts have been agendas such as cultural evolutionism, Dravidian nationalism or Śaiva devotionalism. This essay builds on ideas articulated by the contemporary Tamil theorist K. Civatampi, examining how various models of periodization have frozen the Jains in the ancient past. Further, it (...)
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  • Tamil, Vaiṣṇava, Vaidika: Kiruṣṇacuvāmi Aiyaṅkār, Irāmānuja Tātācāriyār and Modern Tamil Literary History. [REVIEW]Srilata Raman - 2011 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (6):647-676.
    The writing of literary histories of Tamil literature coincided with the practice of history itself as a discipline starting in the late nineteenth century. The historiographical practices conflated Tamil literary history, religious history, as well as notions of the Tamil nation, which led to such works becoming vitally important legitimising narratives that established the claim of self-defining groups within a new Tamil modernity. The absence of such a narrative also meant the erasure of a particular group, identifying itself as a (...)
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  • Tamil, Vaisnava, Vaidika: Kirusnacuvami Aiyaakar, Iramanuja Tatacariyar and Modern Tamil Literary History.Srilata Raman - 2011 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (6):647-676.
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  • The Tirukkaḷiṟṟuppaṭiyār : Transition From Bhakti to Caiva Cittāntam Philosophy.Ranganathan Balasubramanian - unknown
    This thesis is a Tamil to English translation of Tirukkaḷirruppaṭiyar, composed by Uyyavanta Tevanayanar toward the end of the twelfth century C.E. The work contains one hundred quatrains of Tamil poetry composed in veṇpa meter. It is a poetic expansion of Tiruvuntiyar, an earlier composition likely by the author's teacher's teacher. The TKP is a transitional text between the devotional religious bhakti hymns of the nayanmar, who lived between the sixth century and the twelfth, and the Saiva-Siddhanta Theo-philosophical system, which (...)
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  • Gracious Possession, Gracious Bondage: Śiva’s Aruḷ in Māṇikkavācakar’s Tiruvācakam.A. Gardner Harris - 2016 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 44 (3):411-436.
    The primary concern in this paper is to examine the nature of Śiva’s aruḷ—his generative and salvific energy—as portrayed in Tiruvācakam, Māṇikkavācakar’s important but understudied text of medieval bhakti poems. Close attention is paid to the poet’s description of Śiva’s aruḷ as inducing seemingly incongruous ontological states of being—one of ecstatic possession that results in rapturous dance and one of spiritual bondage. In doing so, this paper posits that Māṇikkavācakar is using aruḷ as śakti is used in the philosophy of (...)
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