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Jared D. Harris (2009). What’s Wrong with Executive Compensation?

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  1.  1
    The Effects of Current Income Attributes on Nonprofessional Investors’ Say-on-Pay Judgments: Does Fairness Still Matter?Steven E. Kaplan & Valentina L. Zamora - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (2):407-425.
    The say-on-pay regulation in the Dodd-Frank Act requires publicly-traded U.S. firms to hold a nonbinding, advisory shareholder vote on executive compensation. Advocates claim that SOP voting gives shareholders a mechanism to hold managers and boards more accountable. Critics contend that SOP votes may simplistically reflect shareholders’ reactions to the overall value of CEO compensation or the firm’s net income. However, based on prior research, we contend that market participants’ SOP votes are likely to consider current income attributes. For example, the (...)
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  2.  3
    Do Leveraged Firms Underinvest in Corporate Social Responsibility? Evidence From Health and Safety Programs in U.S. Firms.Christophe Moussu & Steve Ohana - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 135 (4):715-729.
    The explosion of health-related costs in U.S. firms over more than a decade is a huge concern for managers. The initiation of Health and Safety programs at the firm level is an adequate Corporate Social Responsibility initiative to contain this evolution. However, in spite of their documented efficiency, firms underinvest in those programs. This appears as a puzzle for health economists. In this paper, we uncover a strong negative relation of financial leverage to the implementation of H&S programs. The negative (...)
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  3.  14
    Do Compensation Committee Members Perceive Changing CEO Incentive Performance Targets Mid-Cycle to Be Fair?Anne M. Wilkins, Dana R. Hermanson & Jeffrey R. Cohen - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (3):623-638.
    We examine the influences of social capital, source credibility, and fairness perceptions on the judgments of experienced compensation committee members who are considering a proposal to reduce management’s performance targets in the middle of a compensation cycle due to difficult circumstances. Eighty-nine U.S. public company CC members participated in a 2 × 2 experiment with social capital and source credibility each manipulated as low or high, and outcome fairness to management, process fairness to shareholders, and outcome fairness to shareholders included (...)
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  4.  8
    An Examination of the Effect of CEO Social Ties and CEO Reputation on Nonprofessional Investors’ Say-on-Pay Judgments.Steven E. Kaplan, Janet A. Samuels & Jeffrey Cohen - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (1):103-117.
    CEO compensation has received much attention from both academics and regulators. However, academics have given scant attention to understanding judgments about CEO compensation by third parties such as investors. Our study contributes to the ethics literature on CEO compensation by examining whether judgments about CEO compensation are influenced by two aspects of a company’s tone at the top—social ties between the CEO and members of the Executive Compensation Committee and the CEO’s Reputation, particularly for financial reporting and disclosures. Although, stock (...)
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  5.  19
    Egalitarianism and Executive Compensation: A Relational Argument.Pierre-Yves Néron - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (1):171-184.
    What, if anything, is wrong with high executive compensation? Is the common “lay reaction” of indignation and moral outrage justified? In this paper, my main goal is to articulate in a more systematic and philosophical manner the egalitarian responses to these questions. In order to do so, I suggest that we take some insights from recent debates on two versions of egalitarianism: a distributive one, according to which no one should be worse off than others because of unfair distributions of (...)
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  6.  15
    Using Inside Job to Teach Business Ethics.Ernest N. Biktimirov & Don Cyr - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):209-219.
    This article recommends the film Inside Job as an effective teaching tool for illustrating the ethical issues that surrounded the global financial crisis of 2008 and the subsequent economic downturn. The study discusses issues such as the revolving door, conflicts of interest, fiduciary duty, executive compensation, and financial regulation. The presentation of each ethical issue comprises suggested questions, background information, and guides to specific sections of the film. An overview of the film is provided as well.
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  7.  26
    Executive Pay and Legitimacy: Changing Discursive Battles Over the Morality of Excessive Manager Compensation. [REVIEW]Maria Joutsenvirta - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (3):459-477.
    How is the (il)legitimacy of manager compensation constructed in social interaction? This study investigated discursive processes through which heavily contested executive pay schemes of the Finnish energy giant Fortum were constructed as (il)legitimate in public during 2005–2009. The critical discursive analysis of media texts identified five legitimation strategies through which politicians, journalists, and other social actors contested these schemes and, at the same time, constructed subject positions for managers, politicians, and citizens. The comparison of two debate periods surrounding the 2007–2008 (...)
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