Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Descartes on Causation.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2008 - Oup Usa.
    This book is a systematic study of Descartes' theory of causation and its relation to the medieval and early modern scholastic philosophy that provides its proper historical context. The argument presented here is that even though Descartes offered a dualistic ontology that differs radically from what we find in scholasticism, his views on causation were profoundly influenced by scholastic thought on this issue. This influence is evident not only in his affirmation in the Meditations of the abstract scholastic axioms that (...)
  • Malebranche’s Theory of the Soul: A Cartesian Interpretation.Tad Schmaltz - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
    This book offers a provocative interpretation of the theory of the soul in the writings of the French Cartesian, Nicolas Malebranche (1638-1715). Though recent work on Malebranche's philosophy of mind has tended to emphasize his account of ideas, Schmaltz focuses rather on his rejection of Descartes' doctrine that the mind is better known than the body. In particular, he considers and defends Malebranche's argument that this rejection has a Cartesian basis. Schmaltz reveals that this argument not only provides a fresh (...)
  • Metaphysical Themes, 1274–1671.Robert Pasnau - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    The thirty chapters work through various fundamental metaphysical issues, sometimes focusing more on scholastic thought, sometimes on the seventeenth century.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  • The Eleatic Descartes.Thomas Lennon - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (1):29-45.
    : Given Descartes's conception of extension, space and body, there are deep problems about how there can be any real motion. The argument here is that in fact Descartes takes motion to be only phenomenal. The paper sets out the problems generated by taking motion to be real, the solution to them found in the Cartesian texts, and an explanation of those texts in which Descartes appears on the contrary to regard motion as real.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Concurrence or Divergence? Reconciling Descartes's Physics with His Metaphysics.Helen Hattab - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (1):49-78.
    : This paper interprets Descartes's use of the Scholastic doctrine of divine concurrence in light of contemporaneous sources, and argues against two prevailing occasionalist interpretations. On the first occasionalist reading God's concurrence or cooperation with natural causes is always mediate (i.e., concurrence reduces to God's continual recreation of substances). The second reading restricts God's immediate concurrence to his co-action with minds. This paper shows that Descartes's metaphysical commitments do not necessitate either form of occasionalism, and that he is more plausibly (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Is Descartes a Temporal Atomist?Ken Levy - 2005 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (4):627 – 674.
    I argue that Descartes' Second Causal Proof of God in the Third Meditation evidences, and commits him to, the belief that time is "strongly discontinuous" -- that is, that there is actually a gap between each consecutive moment of time. Much of my article attempts to reconcile this interpretation, the "received view," with Descartes' statements about time, space, and matter in his other writings, including his correspondence with various philosophers.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Does Continuous Creation Entail Occasionalism?: Malebranche (and Descartes).Andrew Pessin - 2000 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):413-439.
    ‘God needs no instruments to act,’ Malebranche writes in Search 6.2.3; “it suffices that He wills in order that a thing be, because it is a contradiction that He should will and that what He wills should not happen. Therefore, His power is His will”. After nearly identical language in Treatise 1.12, Malebranche writes that “[God's] wills are necessarily efficacious … His power differs not at all from His will”. God exercises His causal power, here, via His volitions; what He (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Causation Debate in Modern Philosophy, 1637-1739.Kenneth Clatterbaugh - 1998 - Routledge.
    The Causation Debate in Modern Philosophy examines the debate that began as modern science separated itself from natural philosophy in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The book specifically explores the two dominant approaches to causation as a metaphysical problem and as a scientific problem. As philosophy and science turned from the ideas of Aristotle that dominated western thought throughout the renaissance, one of the most pressing intellectual problems was how to replace Aristotelian science with its doctine of the four causes. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Malebranche.Andrew Pyle - 2003 - Routledge.
    Nicolas Malebranche is one of the most important philosophers of the 17th Century after Descartes. A pioneer of Rationalism, he was one of the first to champion and to further Cartesian ideas. Andrew Pyle places Malebranche's work in the context of Descartes and other philosophers, and also in its relation to ideas about faith and reason. He examines the entirety of Malebranche's writings, including the famous The Search After Truth , which was admired and criticized by both Leibniz and Locke. (...)
  • Part of Nature and Division in Margaret Cavendish’s Materialism.Jonathan L. Shaheen - 2019 - Synthese 196 (9):3551-3575.
    This paper pursues a question about the spatial relations between the three types of matter posited in Margaret Cavendish’s metaphysics. It examines the doctrine of complete blending and a distinctive argument against atomism, looking for grounds on which Cavendish can reject the existence of spatial regions composed of only one or two types of matter. It establishes, through that examination, that Cavendish operates with a causal conception of parts of nature and a dynamic notion of division. While the possibility of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Psychology, Philosophy, and Cognitive Science: Reflections on the History and Philosophy of Experimental Psychology.Gary Hatfield - 2002 - Mind and Language 17 (3):207-232.
    This article critically examines the views that psychology first came into existence as a discipline ca. 1879, that philosophy and psychology were estranged in the ensuing decades, that psychology finally became scientific through the influence of logical empiricism, and that it should now disappear in favor of cognitive science and neuroscience. It argues that psychology had a natural philosophical phase (from antiquity) that waxed in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, that this psychology transformed into experimental psychology ca. 1900, that philosophers (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • A Interação Entre a Forma E a Matéria Em Tomás de Aquino E as Interações Do Sistema Cartesiano.Márcio Augusto Damin Custódio - 2015 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 56 (131):173-189.
    Este artigo explora a relação que Descartes estabelece com as noções de forma e de matéria do aristotelismo escolástico ao tratar da interação entre as substâncias nas correspondências com Elisabeth, Gassendi e Arnauld. Partindo do exemplo do peso utilizado por Descartes em diversas cartas, traça-se uma relação de identidade entre a noção de forma em Tomás de Aquino e de pensamento em Descartes, assim como se traça a crítica à noção de forma, entendida como qualidade oculta, para os corpos inanimados. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Science, Certainty, and Descartes.Gary Hatfield - 1988 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988:249 - 262.
    During the 1630s Descartes recognized that he could not expect all legitimate claims in natural science to meet the standard of absolute certainty. The realization resulted from a change in his physics, which itself arose not through methodological reflections, but through developments in his substantive metaphysical doctrines. Descartes discovered the metaphysical foundations of his physics in 1629-30; as a consequence, the style of explanation employed in his physical writings changed. His early methodological conceptions, as preserved in the Rules and sketched (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Philosophy and Memory Traces: Descartes to Connectionism.John Sutton - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    Philosophy and Memory Traces defends two theories of autobiographical memory. One is a bewildering historical view of memories as dynamic patterns in fleeting animal spirits, nervous fluids which rummaged through the pores of brain and body. The other is new connectionism, in which memories are 'stored' only superpositionally, and reconstructed rather than reproduced. Both models, argues John Sutton, depart from static archival metaphors by employing distributed representation, which brings interference and confusion between memory traces. Both raise urgent issues about control (...)
  • Sensible Ends: Latent Teleology in Descartes' Account of Sensation.Alison J. Simmons - 2001 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (1):49-75.
  • Was Spinoza a Naturalist?Alexander Douglas - 2015 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 96 (1):77-99.
    In this article I dispute the claim, made by several contemporary scholars, that Spinoza was a naturalist. ‘Naturalism’ here refers to two distinct but related positions in contemporary philosophy. The first, ontological naturalism, is the view that everything that exists possesses a certain character permitting it to be defined as natural and prohibiting it from being defined as supernatural. I argue that the only definition of ontological naturalism that could be legitimately applied to Spinoza's philosophy is so unrestrictive as to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Descartes’s Dualism.Marleen Rozemond - 1998 - Harvard University Press.
    In her first book, Marleen Rozemond explicates Descartes's aim to provide a metaphysics that would accommodate mechanistic science and supplant scholasticism.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  • Cartesian Causation: Body–Body Interaction, Motion, and Eternal Truths Tad M. SchmaltzE-Mail The Corresponding Author.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (4):737-762.
    There is considerable debate among scholars over whether Descartes allowed for genuine body–body interaction. I begin by considering Michael Della Rocca’s recent claim that Descartes accepted such interaction, and that his doctrine of the creation of the eternal truths indicates how this interaction could be acceptable to him. Though I agree that Descartes was inclined to accept real bodily causes of motion, I differ from Della Rocca in emphasizing that his ontology ultimately does not allow for them. This is not (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Mind-Body Union, Interaction, and Subsumption.Louis E. Loeb - 2005 - In Christia Mercer (ed.), Early Modern Philosophy: Mind, Matter, and Metaphysics. Oxford University Press. pp. 65--85.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Metaphysics and the Origins of Modern Science: Descartes and the Importance of Laws of Nature.John Henry - 2004 - Early Science and Medicine 9 (2):73-114.
    This paper draws attention to the crucial importance of a new kind of precisely defined law of nature in the Scientific Revolution. All explanations in the mechanical philosophy depend upon the interactions of moving material particles; the laws of nature stipulate precisely how these interact; therefore, such explanations rely on the laws of nature. While this is obvious, the radically innovatory nature of these laws is not fully acknowledged in the historical literature. Indeed, a number of scholars have tried to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Causation and Laws of Nature in Early Modern Philosophy.Walter Ott - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
  • Experiment in Cartesian Courses: The Case of Professor Burchard de Volder.Tammy Nyden - 2010 - The Circulation of Science and Technology.
    In 1675, Burchard de Volder became the first university physics professor to introduce the demonstration of experiments into his lectures and to create a special university classroom, The Leiden Physics Theatre, for this specific purpose. This is surprising for two reasons: first, early pre-Newtonian experiment is commonly associated with Italy and England, and second, de Volder is committed to Cartesian philosophy, including the view that knowledge gathered through the senses is subject to doubt, while that deducted from first principles is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Metaphysical Roots of Cartesian Physics: The Law of Rectilinear Motion.Geoffrey Gorham - 2005 - Perspectives on Science 13 (4):431-451.
    : This paper presents a detailed account of Descartes' derivation of his second law of nature—the law of rectilinear motion—from a priori metaphysical principles. Unlike the other laws the proof of the second depends essentially on a metaphysical assumption about the temporal immediacy of God's operation. Recent commentators (e.g., Des Chene and Garber) have not adequately explained the precise role of this assumption in the proof and Descartes' reasoning has continued to seem somewhat arbitrary as a result. My account better (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Descartes, Natural Philosopher.Margaret J. Osler - 1992 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 23 (3):509-518.
  • On Force in Cartesian Physics.John Byron Manchak - 2009 - Philosophy of Science 76 (3):295-306.
    There does not seem to be a consistent way to ground the concept of “force” in Cartesian first principles. In this article, I first review the literature on the subject. Then, I offer an alternative interpretation of force—one that seems to be coherent and consistent with Descartes’ project. Not only does the new position avoid the problems of previous interpretations, but it does so in such a way as to support and justify those previous interpretations. *Received June 2007; revised June (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Je-Ne-Sais-Quoi in Early Modern Europe: Encounters with a Certain Something.Richard Scholar - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    What is the je-ne-sais-quoi? How - if at all - can it be put into words? In addressing these questions, Richard Scholar offers the first full-length study of the je-ne-sais-quoi and its fortunes in early modern Europe. He describes the rise and fall of the expression as a noun and as a topic of debate, examines its cluster of meanings, and uncovers the scattered traces of its 'pre-history'. The je-ne-sais-quoi is often assumed to belong purely to the realm of the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Problem of Secondary Causation in Descartes: A Response to Des Chene.Helen Hattab - 2000 - Perspectives on Science 8 (2):93-118.
    : In this paper I address the vexed question of secondary causation in René Descartes' physics, and examine several influential interpretations, especially the one recently proposed by Dennis Des Chene. I argue that interpreters who regard Cartesian bodies as real secondary causes, on the grounds that the modes of body include real forces, contradict Descartes' account of modes. On the other hand, those who deny that Descartes affirms secondary causation, on the grounds that forces cannot be modes of extension, commit (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Malebranche, by Andrew Pyle.Susan Peppers-Bates - 2007 - European Journal of Philosophy 15 (1):127–129.
  • Teleology and Human Action in Spinoza.Martin Lin - 2006 - Philosophical Review 115 (3):317-354.
    Cover Date: July 2006.Source Info: 115(3), 317-354. Language: English. Journal Announcement: 41-2. Subject: ACTION; CAUSATION; METAPHYSICS; REPRESENTATION; TELEOLOGY. Subject Person: SPINOZA, BENEDICT DE (BARUCH). Update Code: 20130315.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The Metaphysics of Rest in Descartes and Malebranche.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2015 - Res Philosophica 92 (1):21-40.
    I consider a somewhat obscure but important feature of Descartes’s physics that concerns the notion of the “force of rest.” Contrary to a prominent occasionalist interpretation of Descartes’s physics, I argue that Descartes himself attributes real forces to resting bodies. I also take his account of rest to conflict with the view that God conserves the world by “re-creating” it anew at each moment. I turn next to the role of rest in Malebranche. Malebranche takes Descartes to endorse his own (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Divine Activity and Motive Power in Descartes's Physics.Andrew R. Platt - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (4):623 - 646.
    This paper is the first of a two-part reexamination of causation in Descartes's physics. Some scholars ? including Gary Hatfield and Daniel Garber ? take Descartes to be a `partial' Occasionalist, who thinks that God alone is the cause of all natural motion. Contra this interpretation, I agree with literature that links Descartes to the Thomistic theory of divine concurrence. This paper surveys this literature, and argues that it has failed to provide an interpretation of Descartes's view that both distinguishes (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Systematic Divergences in Malebranche and Cudworth.David Cunning - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (3):343-363.
    : For Cudworth, God would be a drudge if He did each and every thing, and so the universe contains plastic natures. Malebranche argues that finite power is unintelligible and thus that God does do each and every thing. The supremacy of God is reflected in the range of His activity and also in the manner of His activity: He acts by general non-composite volitions. Malebranche (like Cudworth) is careful to adjust other aspects of his system to square with his (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Epicurean and Galilean Motion in Gassendi's Physics.Antonia LoLordo - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (2):301–314.
    This is about the tension between Epicurean and Galilean accounts of motion in Gassendi. For my more recent thoughts on this, see http://philpapers.org/rec/LOLCEG.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Gassendi's Atomist Account of Generation and Heredity in Plants and Animals.Saul Fisher - 2003 - Perspectives on Science 11 (4):484-512.
    In his accounts of plant and animal generation Pierre Gassendi offers a mechanist story of how organisms create offspring to whom they pass on their traits. Development of the new organism is directed by a material “soul” or animula bearing ontogenetic information. Where reproduction is sexual, two sets of material semina and corresponding animulae meet and jointly determine the division, differentiation, and development of matter in the new organism. The determination of inherited traits requires a means of combining or choosing (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Descartes, the Cartesian Circle, and Epistemology Without God.Michael Della Rocca - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (1):1–33.
    This paper defends an interpretation of Descartes according to which he sees us as having normative (and not merely psychological) certainty of all clear and distinct ideas during the period in which they are apprehended clearly and distinctly. However, on this view, a retrospective doubt about clear and distinct ideas is possible. This interpretation allows Descartes to avoid the Cartesian Circle in an effective way and also shows that Descartes is surprisingly, in some respects, an epistemological externalist. The paper goes (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Epicureanism and Early Modern Naturalism.Antonia LoLordo - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (4):647 - 664.
    It is often suggested that certain forms of early modern philosophy are naturalistic. Although I have some sympathy with this description, I argue that applying the category of naturalism to early modern philosophy is not useful. There is another category that does most of the work we want the category of naturalism to do ? one that, unlike naturalism, was actually used by early moderns.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Rationalists: Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz.Pauline Phemister - 2006 - Polity Press.
    Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz stand out as the great 17th century rationalist philosophers who sought to construct a philosophical system in which theological and philosophical foundations serve to explain the physical, mental and moral universe. In her new book Pauline Phemister explores their contribution to the development of modern philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Metaphysics and Oppression: Heidegger's Challenge to Western Philosophy.John McCumber - 1999 - Indiana University Press.
    Well-documented, brilliant, definitely a major contribution to philosophy!" —Choice In this compelling work, John McCumber unfolds a history of Western metaphysics that is also a history of the legitimation of oppression.
  • Animal Generation and the Mechanical Philosophy: Some Light on the Role of Biology in the Scientific Revolution.Andrew J. Pyle - 1987 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 9 (2):225 - 254.
    In a recent paper, Keith Hutchison has advanced the thesis that the Mechanical Philosophy represents a shift towards supernaturalism in our conception of the physical world. This paper concentrates on one of the great problems of seventeenth-century biological theory — animal generation — to illustrate (and modify) Hutchison's thesis, thereby also serving to locate one role of the life sciences in the Scientific Revolution. This choice of focus enables us to draw heavily on Jacques Roger's seminal work on animal generation (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Descartes's Changing Mind.Peter K. Machamer - 2009 - Princeton University Press.
    This is the first book to focus on Descartes's changing views, and it is welcome."--Roger Ariew, University of South Florida.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Cartesian Causality, Explanation, and Divine Concurrence.Kenneth Clatterbaugh - 1995 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 12 (2):195 - 207.
  • On Philosophy: Notes From a Crisis.John McCumber - 2013 - Stanford University Press.
    Deepening divisions separate today's philosophers, first, from the culture at large; then, from each other; and finally, from philosophy itself. Though these divisions tend to coalesce publicly as debates over the Enlightenment, their roots lie much deeper. Overcoming them thus requires a confrontation with the whole of Western philosophy. Only when we uncover the strange heritage of Aristotle's metaphysics, as reworked, for example, by Descartes and Kant, can we understand contemporary philosophy's inability to dialogue with women, people of color, LGBTs, (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Descartes' Kinematics.Gary Banham - 2009 - Parallax 51:69-82.
    Full-text of this article is not available in this e-prints service. This article was originally published following peer-review in Parallax, published by and copyright Routledge.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Cartesian Causation: Continuous, Instantaneous, Overdetermined.Geoffrey Gorham - 2004 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (4):389-423.
    : Descartes provides an original and puzzling argument for the traditional theological doctrine that the world is continuously created by God. His key premise is that the parts of the duration of anything are "completely independent" of one another. I argue that Descartes derives this temporal independence thesis simply from the principle that causes are necessarily simultaneous with their effects. I argue further that it follows from Descartes's version of the continuous creation doctrine that God is the instantaneous and total (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Reading Descartes Otherwise: Blind, Mad, Dreamy, and Bad.Kyoo Lee - 2013 - Fordham University Press.
    Focusing on the first four images of the Other mobilized in René Descartes’ Meditations—namely, the blind, the mad, the dreamy, and the bad—Reading Descartes Otherwise casts light on what have heretofore been the phenomenological shadows of “Cartesian rationality.” In doing so, it discovers dynamic signs of spectral alterity lodged both at the core and on the edges of modern Cartesian subjectivity. Calling for a Copernican reorientation of the very notion “Cartesianism,” the book's series of close, creatively critical readings of Descartes’ (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Berkeley's Natural Philosophy and Philosophy of Science.Lisa Downing - 2005 - In Kenneth Winkler (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Berkeley. Cambridge University Press. pp. 230--265.
    Although George Berkeley himself made no major scientific discoveries, nor formulated any novel theories, he was nonetheless actively concerned with the rapidly evolving science of the early eighteenth century. Berkeley's works display his keen interest in natural philosophy and mathematics from his earliest writings (Arithmetica, 1707) to his latest (Siris, 1744). Moreover, much of his philosophy is fundamentally shaped by his engagement with the science of his time. In Berkeley's best-known philosophical works, the Principles and Dialogues, he sets up his (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Locke and the Sceptical Challenge.G. A. J. Rogers - 1996 - In G. A. J. Rogers, Sylvana Tomaselli & John W. Yolton (eds.), The Philosophical Canon in the 17th and 18th Centuries: Essays in Honour of John W. Yolton. University of Rochester Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Philosophical Canon in the 17th and 18th Centuries: Essays in Honour of John W. Yolton.G. A. J. Rogers, Sylvana Tomaselli & John W. Yolton (eds.) - 1996 - University of Rochester Press.
  • Self, Reason, and Freedom in Descartes' Metaphysics.Andrea Christofidou - 2012 - Routledge.
    I offer a new understanding of Descartes’ metaphysics, arguing that his primary question is ‘what is real and true?’ – not as we have been accustomed to believe, ‘how can I be certain?’ – an inquiry that requires both reason’s authority and freedom’s autonomy. I argue that without freedom and its internal relation to reason, Descartes’ undertaking would not get off the ground; yet that relation has gone unnoticed by successive studies of his philosophy. I demonstrate that it is only (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Zur Physik von Descartes: Naturgesetze und Stossregeln.Ricardo Lopes Coelho - 2002 - Philosophia Naturalis 39 (1):45-60.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark