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  1. Can Deweyan Pragmatist Aesthetics Provide a Robust Framework for the Philosophy for Children Programme?Sevket Benhur Oral - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (4):361-377.
    In this paper, I argue that Dewey’s pragmatist aesthetics, and in particular, his concept of consummatory experience, should be engaged anew to rethink the merits of the Philosophy for Children programme, which arose in the 1970s in the US as an innovative educational programme that aims to use philosophy to help school children improve their ability to become more conscious of and make judgments about the aspects of their experience that have ethical, aesthetic, political, logical, or even metaphysical meaning. Although (...)
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  • Deep Ecology as a Framework for Student Eco-Philosophical Thinking.William Smith & Annette Gough - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 2 (1).
    Deep ecology is an ecological philosophy that promotes an ecocentric lifestyle to remedy the problems of depleting resources and planetary degradation. An integral part of this ecosophy is the process of forming a metaphysical connection to the earth, referred to as self-realisation; an unfolding of the self out into nature to attain a transcendental, non-egoic state. Findings from our research indicate that secondary school students in environment clubs align with the principles of deep ecology, and show a capacity to become (...)
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  • Collaborative Philosophical Inquiry as Peace Pedagogy.Somayeh Khatibi Moghadam - 2019 - Dissertation, The University of Queensland
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  • An Evaluation of the ‘Philosophy for Children’ Programme: The Impact on Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Skills.Ourania Ventista - 2019 - Dissertation, Durham University
    Philosophy for Children is a school-based intervention currently implemented in more than 60 countries. This thesis examines the evidence regarding the effectiveness of Philosophy for Children for developing pupils’ cognitive and non-cognitive skills. Three different approaches were used. A systematic literature review was conducted of the evidence published in the last 40 years. A new comparative evaluation study was conducted with Year 5 pupils in 17 primary schools in England. The intervention lasted for an academic year, and a pre-test and (...)
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  • The Social Construction of Learning and Teaching in a Classroom Community of Inquiry.M. Kovalainen - unknown
    This thesis concentrates on investigating the social construction of learning and teaching in a classroom that was encultured into working and acting as a community of inquiry across the curriculum. The theoretical and methodological premises of the study draw on sociocultural and sociolinguistic views on learning and instruction. Through this framework, the study aims at investigating the development, implementation and evaluation of the processes and conditions for communal inquiry across different pedagogical situations and across the curriculum in the case study (...)
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  • Developing Communities of Inquiry in the UK: Retrospect and Prospect.Patrick J. M. Costello - 2010 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 30 (2).
    My aim in this article is to offer a critical evaluation of the development of communities of inquiry in the UK, with particular reference to the teaching of philosophy in schools. The paper is divided into four sections. In the first, I examine some key aspects from an historical perspective. The second section focuses on the question: ‘should children be taught to think philosophically?’ Having discussed the teaching of philosophical thinking in the UK, I outline a typical example of a (...)
     
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  • Philosophy for/with Children, Religious Education and Education for Spirituality. Steps Toward a Review of the Literature.Maughn Rollins Gregory & Stefano Oliverio - 2018 - In Ellen Duthie, Félix García Moriyón & Rafael Robles Loro (eds.), Parecidos de familia. Propuestas actuales en Filosofía para Niños / Family resemblances. Current proposals in Philosophy for Children. Madrid, Spain: Anaya. pp. 279-296.
    The authors describe the organization of a review of research literature on the relationship between Philosophy for/with Children (P4/wC) and religious education/education for spirituality (RE-EfS). They summarize a debate about whether the two are mutually enhancing or incompatible. They explain delimiting the scope of the project and present a grid of research questions used to analyze the literature. They summarize findings on how P4/wC is relevant to five categories of aims of RE-EfS: hermeneutical, cultural, socio-political, moral/spiritual, and epistemological. Many papers (...)
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  • Introducing P4C in Kindergarten in Greece.Renia Gasparatou & Maria Kampeza - 2012 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 33 (1):72-82.
    The movement of Philosophy for Children starts with M. Lipman in the early ‘70s. University professor Matthew Lipman noticed that his students lacked critical thinking skills. He suggested that, when students reach university age, it is rather late and difficult to teach them how to think.1 It would be wiser to undertake such a task at a much earlier age. Thus, he proposed the introduction of philosophy in elementary schools.
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  • Introducing a Philosophical Discussion in Your Classroom: An Example of a Community of Enquiry in a Greek Primary School.Ourania Maria Ventista & Marita Paparoussi - 2016 - Childhood and Philosophy 12 (25):611-629.
    Philosophy for Children is implemented in different countries, but there are not many studies which examine P4C in Greek primary schools. This research examines a P4C intervention in a primary school in northern Greece. This study can be used as a guide for educators who are interested in starting implementing P4C, because it describes the structure of the initial P4C session in an untrained classroom and it provides an analysis of easily implemented formative assessment practices. The research questions are similar (...)
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  • Philosophy, Art or Pedagogy? How Should Children Experience Education?Christine Doddington - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (11):1-12.
    There are various programmes currently advocated for ways in which children might encounter philosophy as an explicit part of their education. An analysis of these reveals the ways in which they are predicated on views of what constitutes philosophy. In the sense in which they are inquiry based, purport to encourage the pursuit of puzzlement and contribute towards creating democratic citizens, these programmes either implicitly rest on the work of John Dewey or explicitly use his work as the main warrant (...)
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  • Investigating Pre-School Children’s Ability to Formulate Logical Arguments.Vasiliki Pournantzi, Konstantinos Zacharos & Maria Angela Shiakalli - 2016 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 36 (1):89-109.
    This paper attempts to investigate five and six-year old children’s ability to formulate logical reasoning. More specifically, our interest focuses on the investigation of young children’s ability to use arguments based on logical reasoning. Can pre-school children build arguments based on logical reasoning such as deductive reasoning, or forms of indirect reasoning? Can teaching contribute to the development of you children’s ability to manipulate logical reasoning in the forms previously mentioned? These are the basic questions we attempt to answer in (...)
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  • The Place of ‘Philosophy’ in Preparing Teachers to Teach Pre-College Philosophy: A UK Perspective.Patrick J. M. Costello - 2012 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 33 (1):36-44.
    In a recent issue of this journal, Wendy Turgeon offers what she refers to as ‘Notes for a conversation’ about the place of ‘philosophy’ in preparing teachers to teach pre-college philosophy. In this article, I offer a response to her paper’s key arguments from a UK perspective.
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  • Inoculation Against Wonder: Finding an Antidote in Camus, Pragmatism and the Community of Inquiry.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (9):884-898.
    In this paper, we will explore how Albert Camus has much to offer philosophers of education. Although a number of educationalists have attempted to explicate the educational implications of Camus’ literary works, these analyses have not attempted to extrapolate pedagogical guidelines towards developing an educational framework for children’s philosophical practice in the way Matthew Lipman did from John Dewey’s philosophy of education, which informed his philosophy for children curriculum and pedagogy. We focus on the phenomenology of inquiry; that is, inquiry (...)
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  • Gifts of Time and Space: Co-Educative Companionship in a Community Primary School.Joanna Haynes - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (3):297-311.
    Family-focused community education implies a relational pedagogy, whereby people of different ages and experiences, including children, engage interdependently in the education of selves and others. Educational projects grow out of lived experiences and relationships, evolving in dynamic conditions of community self-organisation and self-expression, however partial and approximate, as opposed to habitual and repetitive actions. In developing educational activities through radical listening, community educators aim to reflect the character of the neighbourhood and build on local knowledge and expertise. The paper reports (...)
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  • Philosophers as Children: Playing with Style in the Philosophy of Education.Andrew Gibbons - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (5):506-518.
    In this article the questions of what counts as play and philosophy are considered in relation to the question of early education for young children. The child subject characterised by the themes of playfulness, emotion, and irrationality is compared to the playful philosopher emanating from the work of Friedrich Nietzsche, Ludwig Wittgenstein and Michel Foucault. This analysis contributes to the exploration of themes of truth and difference, the search for challenges to styles of philosophy in education, and to the role (...)
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  • Enacting Dialogue: The Impact of Promoting Philosophy for Children on the Literate Thinking of Identified Poor Readers, Aged 10.Philip Jenkins - 2010 - Language and Education 24 (6):459-472.
    The Philosophy for Children in Schools Project (P4CISP) is a research project to monitor and evaluate the impact of Philosophy for Children (P4C) on classroom practices. In this paper the impact of P4C on the thinking skills of you children aged 10 is examined. Standardised tests indicated the children had below-average reading ages. The pupils were video recorded while engaged in discussion of questions they had formulated themselves in response to a series of texts in preparation for a community of (...)
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  • The Philosophy for Children Curriculum: Resisting ‘Teacher Proof’ Texts and the Formation of the Ideal Philosopher Child.Karin Murris - 2016 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 35 (1):63-78.
    The philosophy for children curriculum was specially written by Matthew Lipman and colleagues for the teaching of philosophy by non-philosophically educated teachers from foundation phase to further education colleges. In this article I argue that such a curriculum is neither a necessary, not a sufficient condition for the teaching of philosophical thinking. The philosophical knowledge and pedagogical tact of the teacher remains salient, in that the open-ended and unpredictable nature of philosophical enquiry demands of teachers to think in the moment (...)
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  • The Logical Priority of the Question: R. G. Collingwood, Philosophical Hermeneutics and Enquiry-Based Learning.David Aldridge - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (4):71-85.
    The thesis that all learning has the character of enquiry is advanced and its implications are explored. R. G. Collingwood's account of ‘the logical priority of the question’ is explained and Hans-Georg Gadamer's hermeneutical justification and development, particularly the rejection of the re-enactment thesis, is discussed. Educators are encouraged to consider the following implications of the character of the question implied in all learning: (i) that it is a question that is constituted in the event rather than prepared or given (...)
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  • Philosophy with Children, the Stingray and the Educative Value of Disequilibrium.Karin Saskia Murris - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (3-4):667-685.
    Philosophy with children (P4C) 1 presents significant positive challenges for educators. Its 'community of enquiry' pedagogy assumes not only an epistemological shift in the role of the educator, but also a different ontology of 'child' and balance of power between educator and learner. After a brief historical sketch and an outline of the diversity among P4C practitioners, epistemological uncertainty in teaching P4C is crystallised in a succinct overview of theoretical and practical tensions that are a direct result of the implementation (...)
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  • Philosophers as Children: Playing with Style in the Philosophy of Education.Andrew Gibbons - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (5):506–518.
    In this article the questions of what counts as play and philosophy are considered in relation to the question of early education for young children. The child subject characterised by the themes of playfulness, emotion, and irrationality is compared to the playful philosopher emanating from the work of Friedrich Nietzsche, Ludwig Wittgenstein and Michel Foucault. This analysis contributes to the exploration of themes of truth and difference, the search for challenges to styles of philosophy in education, and to the role (...)
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