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  1. The Moral Meaning of Recent Revisions to the SPJ Code of Ethics.Karen L. Slattery - 2016 - Journal of Media Ethics 31 (1):2-17.
    The field of journalism has experienced recent upheavals caused in part by shifts in technology, economic challenges, and questions about the concept of truth telling. This study compares the new version of the Society of Professional Journalists’ Code of Ethics with its 1996 version in an effort to determine how journalists who embrace the ethos of a profession have responded to these challenges, as reflected in the standards and practices outlined in their code. A framework for systematically reading codes is (...)
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  • Digitally Outsourced: The Limitations of Computer-Mediated Transparency.Michael Koliska & Kalyani Chadha - 2016 - Journal of Media Ethics 31 (1):51-62.
    The introduction of digital communication technologies has resulted in the emergence of transparency as a journalistic norm. Often termed the “new objectivity,” transparency has been viewed as central to restoring trust in journalism. Not surprisingly, news organizations have claimed they have introduced transparency measures that enable audiences to look behind the curtain of news production. We, however, argue that such efforts primarily involve technological features that are institutionally mandated with little involvement from journalists. That is, transparency in journalism has been (...)
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  • Audience Enabling as Corporate Responsibility for Media Organizations.Laura Olkkonen - 2015 - Journal of Media Ethics 30 (4):268-288.
    Media organizations engaging in journalistic production face ethical challenges that concern business ethics as much as journalism ethics. This article studies expectations of responsibility for media organizations that engage in journalistic production and assesses them from the viewpoint of sector-specific corporate responsibility. The data are obtained from interviews with Finnish nongovernmental organization experts who work closely with media issues. Of the three positive and three negative expectation themes identified, audience enabling was associated with most confidence. Audience enabling deals with the (...)
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  • Media Credibility and Journalistic Role Conceptions: Views on Citizen and Professional Journalists Among Citizen Contributors.Deborah S. Chung & Seungahn Nah - 2013 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 28 (4):271-288.
    This study identifies citizen journalists' role conceptions regarding their news contributing activities and their perceptions of professional journalists' roles. Specifically, the ethical criterion of media credibility was assessed to identify predictors on their perceptions of roles. Analyses reveal citizen journalists perceive their roles to be generally similar to professional journalists and even rated certain roles more prominently for themselves. Further, their perceptions of media credibility were found to function as a core belief in how they assessed their roles and also (...)
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  • Health Journalists' Perceptions of Their Professional Roles and Responsibilities for Ensuring the Veracity of Reports of Health Research.Rowena Forsyth, Bronwen Morrell, Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Christopher F. C. Jordens & Simon Chapman - 2012 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 27 (2):130 - 141.
    Health industries attempt to influence the public through the news media and through their relationships with expert academics and opinion leaders. This study reports journalists' perceptions of their professional roles and responsibilities regarding the relationships between industry and academia and research results. Journalists believe that responsibility for the scientific validity of their reports rests with academics and systems of peer review. However, this approach fails to account for the extent of industry-academy interactions and the flaws of peer review. Health journalists' (...)
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  • Moral Agency in Media: Toward a Model to Explore Key Components of Ethical Practice.Patrick Lee Plaisance - 2011 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 26 (2):96 - 113.
    Recent advances in moral psychology and applications of virtue science have created promising opportunities to refine theories of media practice and ethical principles. This article sets forth the theoretical foundation for a model of virtuous action among media exemplars that is multidimensional, inductive, and informed by these developments. The model draws on a range of psycho-social assessment tools to explore five key dimensions of virtuous behavior: story of the self, personality, integration of morality into the self, moral ecology, and moral (...)
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  • Trust and the Economics of News.Bastiaan Vanacker & Genelle Belmas - 2009 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 24 (2-3):110 – 126.
    As trust in the news media continues to decline, news organizations must find ways to bolster that trust, often in the face of diminishing budgets and dwindling bottom lines. Can trust support and even bolster economic success in news organizations? We offer a multidimensional model of trust that takes into account, among other elements, considerations of risk and scope, and suggest that journalistic excellence and economic success can support each other and result in increased public trust in news media.
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  • “Comment Is Free, but Facts Are Sacred”: User-Generated Content and Ethical Constructs at theGuardian.Jane B. Singer & Ian Ashman - 2009 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 24 (1):3-21.
    This case study examines how journalists at Britain's Guardian newspaper and affiliated Web site are assessing and incorporating user-generated content in their perceptions and practices. A framework of existentialism helps highlight constructs and professional norms of interest. It is one of the first data-driven studies to explore how journalists are negotiating personal and social ethics within a digital network.
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  • Conversation and Credibility: Broadening Journalism Criticism Through Public Engagement.Glen Feighery - 2011 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 26 (2):158 - 175.
    As technology and public expectations have expanded journalism into a practice shared by many, criticism remains the province of a relative few. Bloggers have added their voices to professionals' self-criticism, and social media have vastly expanded opportunities for dialogic exchanges. Building on earlier research, this article seeks to expand journalism criticism by applying the dominant public relations model of two-way symmetrical communication. This includes collaboration, compromise, listening, and a desire to balance power?attributes that can enable journalists to be transparent, accountable, (...)
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