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  1. Heidegger in the Machine: The Difference Between Techne and Mechane.Todd S. Mei - 2016 - Continental Philosophy Review 49 (3):267-292.
    Machines are often employed in Heidegger’s philosophy as instances to illustrate specific features of modern technology. But what is it about machines that allows them to fulfill this role? This essay argues there is a unique ontological force to the machine that can be understood when looking at distinctions between techne and mechane in ancient Greek sources and applying these distinctions to a reading of Heidegger’s early thought on equipment and later thought on poiesis. Especially with respect to Heidegger’s appropriation (...)
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  • The Ghost of the Unnameable.Roy Sellars - 2012 - Derrida Today 5 (2):248-263.
    According to Jacques Derrida, there is a différance – his infamous mis-spelling of the French différence – that ‘has no name in our language’ (‘Différance’, in Margins of Philosophy); its name is not différance, and it is not just nameless but ‘unnameable’. ‘The a of différance’, he also tells us, ‘remains silent, secret and discreet as a tomb’. My essay, which is haunted throughout by Derrida, seeks to address the following question: if the a of différance is like a tomb, (...)
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  • A Philosophical Dialogue Between Heidegger and Schelling.Lore HÜhn - 2014 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 6 (1):16-34.
    Since the seminal 1955 habilitation by Heidegger's pupil, Walter Schulz, it has become an open secret that Schelling's philosophy, more than that of any of the other German Idealists, is an immediate antecedent to Heidegger's thought. For this reason, it is all the more fascinating that to this day research is still lopsidedly concerned with the interpretation of Heidegger's reading of Schelling's Freedom Essay and that a thorough and overarching investigation into the idealistic inheritance of Martin Heidegger's thought remains wanting. (...)
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  • Learning Professional Ways of Being: Ambiguities of Becoming.Gloria Dall’Alba - 2009 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (1):34-45.
    The purpose of professional education programs is to prepare aspiring professionals for the challenges of practice within a particular profession. These programs typically seek to ensure the acquisition of necessary knowledge and skills, as well as providing opportunities for their application. While not denying the importance of knowledge and skills, this paper reconfigures professional education as a process of becoming. Learning to become a professional involves not only what we know and can do, but also who we are (becoming). It (...)
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  • What is Schutzian Phenomenology? Outlining the Program of Social Phenomenology.Carlos Belvedere - 2013 - Schutzian Research. A Yearbook of Worldly Phenomenology and Qualitative Social Science 5 (2013):65-80.
    My aim is to depict Schutzian phenomenology as a whole. In order to do so, I will start by presenting Schutz’s ideas on the phenomenological, egological,and eidetic reductions as mere technical devices. Then I will show how they are interconnected with phenomenological psychology. After that, I will argue thatphenomenological psychology leads to worldly phenomenology and I will explore its consequences for transcendental philosophy and the empirical sciences. I will conclude with some reflections on naturalized phenomenology and how it finds absolute (...)
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  • Thinking Technology, Thinking Nature.Dana S. Belu - 2005 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 48 (6):572 – 591.
  • Heidegger East and West: Philosophy as Educative Contemplation.David Lewin - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (2):221-239.
    Resonances between Heidegger's philosophy and Eastern religious traditions have been widely discussed by scholars. The significance of Heidegger's thinking for education has also become increasingly clear over recent years. In this article I argue that an important aspect of Heidegger's work, the relevance of which to education is relatively undeveloped, relates to his desire to overcome Western metaphysics, a project that invites an exploration of his connections with Eastern thought. I argue that Heidegger's desire to deconstruct the West implies the (...)
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  • Return to Life and Reconstruct Confucianism: An Outline of Comparative Study on Confucianism and Phenomenology.Huang Yushun - 2007 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (3):454-473.
    Confucianism can be analyzed at three levels of ideas: life as existence (Sein) itself; the Confucian metaphysics about metaphysical beings; and the Confucian doctrines about tangible existences. In the eyes of Confucians, life itself is displayed as the feeling of benevolence in the first place. To reconstruct Confucianism is to return to life and perceive it as a fundamental source. That means to historically return to the original Confucianism during and even before the Axial Period, in essence it is to (...)
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  • Being at Home Among Things: Heidegger’s Reflections on Dwelling.Nader El-Bizri - 2011 - Environment, Space, Place 3 (1):47-71.
    This article examines Heidegger’s account of dwelling while placing it in the broad context of a wide array of his lectures and the constellation of his collected writings. The focus on this question is primarily ontological in character, in spite of the spatial significance of the phenomenon of dwelling, and the bearings it has on a variety of disciplines that interrogate its essence, be it in architectural humanities and design or in geography, which probe the various elements of its architectonic (...)
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  • How Merleau-Ponty Can Provide a Philosophical Foundation for Vandana Shiva's Views on Biodiversity.Shlomit Tamari - 2010 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 2 (2):275-289.
    This essay argues that Merleau-Ponty’s concept of nature as a “privileged expression” of ontology provides the conceptual support for a more responsible attitude toward humans and nature. Furthermore, this concept of nature needs to be viewed in the light of a more profound concept that opens a new vision of the human being’s place in the world, namely Merleau-Ponty’s fields of perception. Shiva’s writings pertaining to the environment gain a more profound, yet critical, understanding when viewed in this way. Similarly, (...)
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  • To the Center of the Sky: Heidegger, Polar Symbolism, and Christian Sacred Architecture.William Behun - 2009 - Environment, Space, Place 1 (1):7-25.
    Heidegger’s sense of the holy is an important aspect of his thought, especially in the form that it takes in his later work. By juxtaposingHeidegger’s thinking on the sacred with traditional metaphysician René Guénon’s examination of the symbolism of the sacred pole, we can bring both elements into clearer focus. This paper undertakes to draw together these two radically disparate thinkers not to undermine either’s project, but rather to demonstrate one way in which the sacred can be more thoroughly understood, (...)
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  • The Sartre‐Heidegger Controversy on Humanism and the Concept of Man in Education.Leena Kakkori & Rauno Huttunen - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (4):351-365.
    Jean-Paul Sartre claims in his 1945 lecture ‘Existentialism is a Humanism’ that there are two kinds of existentialism: that of Christians like Karl Jaspers, and atheistic like Martin Heidegger. Sartre's ‘spiritual master’ Heidegger had no problem with Sartre defining him as an atheist, but he had serious problems with Sartre's concept of humanism and existentialism. Heidegger claims that the essence of humanism lies in the essence of the human being. After the Enlightenment, the Western concept of man has been presented (...)
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  • Heidegger Teaching: An Analysis and Interpretation of Pedagogy.Dawn C. Riley - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (8):797-815.
    German philosopher Martin Heidegger stirred educators when in 1951 he claimed teaching is more difficult than learning because teachers must ‘learn to let learn’. However in the main he left the aphorism unexplained as part of a brief four-paragraph, less than two-page set of observations concerning the relationship of teaching to learning; and concluded at the end of those observations that to become a teacher is an ‘exalted matter’. This paper investigates both of Heidegger's claims, interpreting letting learn in the (...)
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  • Testing Times: Questions Concerning Assessment for School Improvement.Nick Peim & Kevin J. Flint - 2009 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (3):342-361.
    Contemporary education now appears to be dominated by the continual drive for improvement measured against the assessment of what students have learned. It is our contention that a foundational relation with assessment organises contemporary education. Here we draw on a 'way of thinking' that is deconstructive in its intent. Such thinking makes clear the vicious circularity of the argument for improvement, wherein assessment valorised in discourses of improvement provides not only a rationalisation for improvement via assessment, but also the very (...)
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  • Notes on Heidegger's Authoritarian Pedagogy.Thomas E. Peterson - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (4):599–623.
    To examine Heidegger's pedagogy is to be invited into a particular era and cultural reality—starting in Weimar Germany and progressing into the rise and fall of the Third Reich. In his attempt to reform the German university in a strictly hierarchical, authoritarian and nationalistic mold, Heidegger addressed one group of students and professors and not another. The petit‐bourgeois student and the future philosophers he invited with his ‘logic of recruitment’ into the corps of instructors, would share his coded language with (...)
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  • Exploring Knowing/Being Through Discordant Professional Practice.Gloria Dall’Alba & Robyn Barnacle - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (13-14):1452-1464.
    Despite an increasing array of ‘quality indicators’ and substantial investments in educating professionals, there continues to be clear evidence of discordant, or even negligent, practice by accredited professionals. We refer to discordant professional practice as being ‘out of tune’ with what is accepted as good practice. In a conceptual/theoretical analysis, we use discordant practice as a backdrop to exploring ways of being professionals. Our analysis is grounded in Heidegger’s notion of being-in-the-world. We explore how being-in-the-world can be uncanny and discordant, (...)
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  • {Le Théâtre de la Cruauté} or When Caring 'Is'.Chris Peers & Joseph Agbenyega - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (14):1-15.
    In this article we offer an ontological theorization of care. The article interrogates the self-evident quality of everyday meanings for ‘care’ that might be generated from psychological or biological discourses; we aim to question the way that ‘care’ is applied in a technical or an emotional sense within the field of early childhood education. The article works towards offering a new theorization that does not treat the meaning of ‘care’ as self-evident. If ‘care’ is a way of addressing concern for (...)
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  • Phenomenology and Theology: Situating Heidegger’s Philosophy of Religion.Matheson Russell - 2011 - Sophia 50 (4):641-655.
    This essay considers the philosophical and theological significance of the phenomenological analysis of Christian faith offered by the early Heidegger. It shows, first, that Heidegger poses a radical and controversial challenge to philosophers by calling them to do without God in an unfettered pursuit of the question of being (through his ‘destruction of onto-theology’); and, second, that this exclusion nonetheless leaves room for a form of philosophical reflection upon the nature of faith and discourse concerning God, namely for a philosophy (...)
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  • Heidegger’s Temple: How Truth Happens When Nothing is Portrayed.Shane Mackinlay - 2010 - Sophia 49 (4):499-507.
    In his essay The Origin of the Work of Art, Martin Heidegger discusses three examples of artworks: a painting by Van Gogh of peasant shoes, a poem about a Roman fountain, and a Greek temple. The new entry on Heidegger’s aesthetics in the Stanford Encylopedia of Philosophy, written by Iain Thomson, focuses on this essay, and Van Gogh’s painting in particular. It argues that Heidegger uses Van Gogh’s painting to set art, as the happening of truth, in relation to ‘nothing’, (...)
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  • Step Back and Encounter: From Continental to Comparative Philosophy.Bret Davis - 2009 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 1 (1):9-22.
    By drawing on the insights of a number of continental as well as Asian thinkers, this article reflects on the “significance” of comparative philosophy—both in the sense of discussing the “meaning” and in the sense of arguing for the “importance” of this endeavor. Encountering another culture allows one to deepen one’s self-understanding by learning to “see oneself from the outside”; this deeper self-understanding in turn allows one to listen to what the other culture has to say. These two moments, or (...)
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  • Fernando Pessoa's Post-Romantic Sense of the World.James Corby - 2011 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 3 (2):165-181.
    Why should philosophy, or even thinking, get in the way of seeing? In attempting to address this question, this paper identifies post-Romanticism as a phenomenologically inflected response to the failure of both pre-Romantic Reflexionsphilosophie and Hegelian speculative overcoming, one that seeks to express our relation to the world in a way that does not rely on a reflection model of consciousness and gives no support to the notion of a cognitively inaccessible absolute. It will be suggested that the poetry of (...)
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  • Towards the Origin of Modern Technology: Reconfiguring Martin Heidegger’s Thinking. [REVIEW]Søren Riis - 2011 - Continental Philosophy Review 44 (1):103-117.
    Martin Heidegger’s radical critique of technology has fundamentally stigmatized modern technology and paved the way for a comprehensive critique of contemporary Western society. However, the following reassessment of Heidegger’s most elaborate and influential interpretation of technology, The Question Concerning Technology, sheds a very different light on his critique. In fact, Heidegger’s phenomenological line of thinking concerning technology also implies a radical critique of ancient technology and the fundamental being-in-the-world of humans. This revision of Heidegger’s arguments claims that The Question Concerning (...)
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  • Truth, or the Futures of Philosophy of Religion.N. N. Trakakis - 2013 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 74 (5):366-390.
    Philosophy of religion, in both its analytic and Continental streams, has been undergoing a renewal for some time now, and I seek to explore this transformation in the fortunes of the discipline by looking at how truth – and religious truth in particular – is conceptualised in both strands of philosophy. I begin with an overview of the way in which truth has been commonly understood across nearly all groups within the analytic tradition, and I will underscore the difficulties and (...)
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  • ‘What Is, Is More Than It Is’: Adorno and Heidegger on the Priority of Possibility.Iain Macdonald - 2011 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (1):31-57.
    (2011). ‘What Is, Is More than It Is’: Adorno and Heidegger on the Priority of Possibility. International Journal of Philosophical Studies: Vol. 19, No. 1, pp. 31-57. doi: 10.1080/09672559.2011.539357.
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  • Sartre and Bergson: A Disagreement About Nothingness.Sarah Richmond - 2007 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 15 (1):77 – 95.
    Henri Bergson's philosophy, which Sartre studied as a student, had a profound but largely neglected influence on his thinking. In this paper I focus on the new light that recognition of this influence throws on Sartre's central argument about the relationship between negation and nothingness in his Being and Nothingness. Sartre's argument is in part a response to Bergson's dismissive, eliminativist account of nothingness in Creative Evolution (1907): the objections to the concept of nothingness with which Sartre engages are precisely (...)
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  • Whitehead's Doctrine of Objectification and Yogācāra Buddhism's Theory of the Three Natures.Adam C. Scarfe - 2002 - Contemporary Buddhism 3 (2):111-125.
  • Hegelian 'Absolute Idealism' with Yogācāra Buddhism on Consciousness, Concept ( Begriff ), and Co-Dependent Origination ( Pratītyasamutpāda ).Adam Scarfe - 2006 - Contemporary Buddhism 7 (1):47-73.
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  • Words That Burn: Why Did the Buddha Say What He Did?Jonardon Ganeri - 2006 - Contemporary Buddhism 7 (1):7-27.
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  • Deciphering Heidegger's Connection with the Daodejing.Lin Ma - 2006 - Asian Philosophy 16 (3):149-171.
    This paper carries out an intensive study of Heidegger's famous reflection on the word dao and of his citations from the Daodejing, with the purpose of elucidating his complex relation with Daoist thinking. First I examine whether dao could be said to be a guideword for Heidegger's path of thinking. Then I discuss Heidegger's citations, in six places of his writings, from five chapters of the Daodejing, by situating them in the immediate textual context as well as against the broad (...)
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  • Augmented Ontologies or How to Philosophize with a Digital Hammer.Stefano Gualeni - 2014 - Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):177-199.
    Could a person ever transcend what it is like to be in the world as a human being? Could we ever know what it is like to be other creatures? Questions about the overcoming of a human perspective are not uncommon in the history of philosophy. In the last century, those very interrogatives were notably raised by American philosopher Thomas Nagel in the context of philosophy of mind. In his 1974 essay What is it Like to Be a Bat?, Nagel (...)
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  • Vision and Voice: Phenomenology and Theology in the Work of Jean-Luc Marion.Merold Westphal - 2007 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1-3):117-137.
    The kind of phenomenology that can be useful to theology will be a hermeneutical phenomenology, one that takes us beyond the Cartesian/Husserlian ideal of presuppositionless intuition. It will also be a phenomenology of inverse intentionality, one in which the constituting subject is constituted by the look and the voice of another. In light of these suggestions, the phenomenology of Jean-Luc Marion is defended against three critiques, namely that it compromises the boundary between phenomenology and theology, that the theology it serves (...)
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  • Blurred Vision: Marion on the 'Possibility' of Revelation. [REVIEW]Matthew I. Burch - 2010 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 67 (3):157 - 171.
    In this paper I challenge Merold Westphal's claim that Jean-Luc Marion's hermeneutical phenomenology is especially useful for theology. I argue that in spite of his explicit allegiance to Husserl's "principle of all principles," Marion fails to embody a commitment to phenomenological seeing in his analyses of revelation. In the sections of Being Given where he discusses revelation, Marion allows faith-based claims to bleed into his phenomenological analyses, resulting in what I call his 'blurred vision'—the pretension that phenomenological seeing can be (...)
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  • Nursing and the Concept of Life: Towards an Ethics of Testimony.Francine Wynn - 2002 - Nursing Philosophy 3 (2):120-132.
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  • Techno-Science and Religious Sin: Orthodox Theology and Heidegger. [REVIEW]Byron Kaldis - 2008 - Sophia 47 (2):107-128.
    This paper places certain religious ideas of Eastern Christianity about our relationship to nature critically against techno-scientific thinking and practice. Specifically, the two focal issues of the discussion are the concept of religious sin, on the one hand, and the peculiarly modern fusion of science and technology, resulting in the novel phenomenon of techno-science, on the other. Two corresponding theses are advanced: that of sin as an epistemic, and not as a moral, error, and that of the “Eucharistic” viz., celebratory (...)
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  • Camus and Nihilism.Ashley Woodward - 2011 - Sophia 50 (4):543-559.
    Camus published an essay entitled ‘Nietzsche and Nihilism,’ which was later incorporated into The Rebel . Camus' aim was to assess Nietzsche's response to the problem of nihilism. My aim is to do the same with Camus. The paper explores Camus' engagement with nihilism through its two major modalities: with respect to the individual and the question of suicide in The Myth of Sisyphus , and with respect to the collective and the question of murder in The Rebel . While (...)
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  • Nishida on Heidegger.Curtis A. Rigsby - 2010 - Continental Philosophy Review 42 (4):511-553.
    Heidegger and East-Asian thought have traditionally been strongly correlated. However, although still largely unrecognized, significant differences between the political and metaphysical stance of Heidegger and his perceived counterparts in East-Asia most certainly exist. One of the most dramatic discontinuities between East-Asian thought and Heidegger is revealed through an investigation of Kitarō Nishida’s own vigorous criticism of Heidegger. Ironically, more than one study of Heidegger and East-Asian thought has submitted that Nishida is that representative of East-Asian thought whose philosophy most closely (...)
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  • Seams in the Desert: Cormac McCarthy’s Literary Ontology of Place.Christopher Yates - 2014 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 6 (2):178-195.
    This article proposes a philosophical reception of writer Cormac McCarthy’s work, a reception oriented specifically toward the subject of “place” as a primary ontological register in two of his novels. More than a mere appraisal of his descriptive prose or the moral weight of his themes, this reading examines the interrogative dimension of his border-country landscapes and the existential horizon distilled therein. Read with reference to the philosophies of Martin Heidegger and Maurice Merleau-Ponty, I argue that McCarthy’s storied concentration on (...)
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  • Self-Sacrifice in Heidegger.Thomas Mautner - 2010 - Philosophia 38 (2):385-398.
    Heidegger’s treatment of self-sacrifice has suffered neglect. In this paper, it is critically analysed and found wanting, and it is argued that for a proper understanding its historical location must be taken into account. The way he treats self-sacrifice presents a particular instance of many recurrent features in his thinking. Some of these can be better understood by reference to the kinship with certain forms of religious thought. In particular, the absence of a moral dimension has a counterpart in certain (...)
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  • The Potentiality of Authenticity in Becoming a Teacher.Angus Brook - 2009 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (1):46-59.
    This paper arises out of the transition from a PhD thesis on Heidegger's phenomenology to my attempts to come to terms with 'becoming a teacher'. The paper will provide a phenomenological interpretation of being a teacher in relation to the question of an 'authentic' interpretation of teaching/learning and the possibility of an authentic interpretative praxis. I will argue that being a teacher is a phenomenon of human existence which can be interpreted as a possible way of being with authentic and (...)
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  • The Existential Sources of Phenomenology: Heidegger on Formal Indication.Matthew I. Burch - 2013 - European Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):258-278.
    : This article contributes to the contemporary debate regarding the young Heidegger’s method of formal indication. Theodore Kisiel argues that this method constitutes a radical break with Husserl---a rejection of phenomenological reflection that paves the way to the non-reflective approach of the Beiträge. Against this view, Steven Crowell argues that formal indication is continuous with Husserlian phenomenology---a refinement of phenomenological reflection that reveals its existential sources. I evaluate this debate and adduce further considerations in favor of Crowell’s view. To do (...)
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  • A Brief History of Continental Realism.Lee Braver - 2012 - Continental Philosophy Review 45 (2):261-289.
    This paper explains the nature and origin of what I am calling Transgressive Realism, a middle path between realism and anti-realism which tries to combine their strengths while avoiding their weaknesses. Kierkegaard created the position by merging Hegel’s insistence that we must have some kind of contact with anything we can call real (thus rejecting noumena), with Kant’s belief that reality fundamentally exceeds our understanding; human reason should not be the criterion of the real. The result is the idea that (...)
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  • Reflecting on the Ongoing Aftermath of Heart Transplantation: Jean-Luc Nancy's L'intrus.Francine Wynn - 2009 - Nursing Inquiry 16 (1):3-9.
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  • Nursing and the Unpresentable.Brenda L. Cameron - 2004 - Nursing Philosophy 5 (1):1–3.
  • Multiple Moving Perceptions of the Real: Arendt, Merleau-Ponty, and Truitt.Helen A. Fielding - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (3):518-534.
    This paper explores the ethical insights provided by Anne Truitt's minimalist sculptures, as viewed through the phenomenological lenses of Hannah Arendt's investigations into the co-constitution of reality and Maurice Merleau-Ponty's investigations into perception. Artworks in their material presence can lay out new ways of relating and perceiving. Truitt's works accomplish this task by revealing the interactive motion of our embodied relations and how material objects can actually help to ground our reality and hence human potentiality. Merleau-Ponty shows how our prereflective (...)
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  • Language and Technology: Maps, Bridges, and Pathways.Mark Coeckelbergh - 2017 - AI and Society 32 (2).
    Contemporary philosophy of technology after the empirical turn has surprisingly little to say on the relation between language and technology. This essay describes this gap, offers a preliminary discussion of how language and technology may be related to show that there is a rich conceptual space to be gained, and begins to explore some ways in which the gap could be bridged by starting from within specific philosophical subfields and traditions. One route starts from philosophy of language (both ‘‘analytic’’ and (...)
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  • Vision and Voice: Phenomenology and Theology in the Work of Jean-Luc Marion. [REVIEW]Merold Westphal - 2006 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1/3):117 - 137.
    The kind of phenomenology that can be useful to theology will be a hermeneutical phenomenology, one that takes us beyond the Cartesian/Husserlian ideal of presuppositionless intuition. It will also be a phenomenology of inverse intentionality, one in which the constituting subject is constituted by the look and the voice of another. In light of these suggestions, the phenomenology of Jean-Luc Marion is defended against three critiques, namely that it compromises the boundary between phenomenology and theology, that the theology it serves (...)
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  • Genetic Information, Physical Interpreters and Thermodynamics; The Material-Informatic Basis of Biosemiosis.Peter R. Wills - 2014 - Biosemiotics 7 (1):141-165.
    The sequence of nucleotide bases occurring in an organism’s DNA is often regarded as a codescript for its construction. However, information in a DNA sequence can only be regarded as a codescript relative to an operational biochemical machine, which the information constrains in such a way as to direct the process of construction. In reality, any biochemical machine for which a DNA codescript is efficacious is itself produced through the mechanical interpretation of an identical or very similar codescript. In these (...)
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  • Post-Established Harmony: Kant and Analogy Reconsidered.Daniel Whistler - 2013 - Sophia 52 (2):235-258.
    This essay is a response to John Milbank’s comparison of Kant and Aquinas’ theories of analogy in ‘A Critique of the Theology of Right’. A critique of Milbank’s essay forms the point of departure for my reconstruction of Kant’s actual theory of analogy. I show that the usual focus on the Prolegomena for this end is insufficient; in fact, the full extent of Kant’s theory of analogy only becomes clear in the Critique of Judgment. I also consider the significance of (...)
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  • Responsorial Thought: Jean‐Louis Chrétien's Distinctive Approach to Theology and Phenomenology.Andrew L. Prevot - 2015 - Heythrop Journal 56 (6):975-987.
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  • Facing Animals: A Relational, Other-Oriented Approach to Moral Standing.Mark Coeckelbergh & David J. Gunkel - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (5):715-733.
    In this essay we reflect critically on how animal ethics, and in particular thinking about moral standing, is currently configured. Starting from the work of two influential “analytic” thinkers in this field, Peter Singer and Tom Regan, we examine some basic assumptions shared by these positions and demonstrate their conceptual failings—ones that have, despite efforts to the contrary, the general effect of marginalizing and excluding others. Inspired by the so-called “continental” philosophical tradition , we then argue that what is needed (...)
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