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  1. Critique of Modernity in the Philosophy of Nishitani Keiji.Niklas Söderman - 2018 - Asian Philosophy 28 (3):224-240.
    ABSTRACTThis article analyses Nishitani Keiji’s persistent critique of modernity and how it intertwines with other issues—such as nihilism, science and religion—in his philosophy. While Nishitani gained some notoriety for his views on overcoming modernity during WWII, this article will look at his relationship with the issue more in the scope of his whole philosophical career. Pulling together various strands that weave through Nishitani’s treatment of modernity, its relation to nihilism and his views for overcoming both, we find that it motivates (...)
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  • Nishida on God, Barth and Christianity.Curtis A. Rigsby - 2009 - Asian Philosophy 19 (2):119 – 157.
    Despite the central role that the concept of God played in Kitarō Nishida's philosophy—and more broadly, within the Kyoto School which formed around Nishida—Anglophone studies of the religious philosophy of modern Japan have not seriously considered the nature and role of God in Nishida's thought. Indeed, relevant Anglophone studies even strongly suggest that where the concept of God does appear in Nishida's writings, such a concept is to be dismissed as a 'subjective fiction', a 'penultimate designation', or a peripheral Western (...)
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  • Romancing Emptiness.Sor-Ching Low - 2006 - Contemporary Buddhism 7 (2):129-147.
    The John Cage that the world came to know made his dramatic entrance in 1952, a year that Cage scholars generally refer to as his landmark year. Artistically, three of his works, in particular, stand as points of arrival, Music of Changes, 4’33”, and the multi-media Black Mountain Piece, but these works could also be seen as important vehicles through which Cage conveyed his new vision shaped by Eastern philosophies and Zen, particularly as taught by the Zen scholar D. T. (...)
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  • Nishida’s Bow: Evaluating Nishida’s Wartime Actions.Elizabeth McManaman Tyler - 2019 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 11 (1):19-33.
    ABSTRACTThis paper examines Nishida’s later work on the historical world and religious transformation in an effort to clarify his political writings during the Pacific War. It sheds new light on the debate over the interpretation of Nishida’s wartime actions through reflection on a brief interaction Nishida had with the student Kiyoshi Kato during World War II. Shinran’s influence on Nishida will also be analyzed to reveal that the moral and religious insufficiency of the practitioner is a key aspect of his (...)
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  • Modern Japanese Philosophy: Historical Contexts and Cultural Implications.Yoko Arisaka - 2014 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 74:3-25.
    The paper provides an overview of the rise of Japanese philosophy during the period of rapid modernization in Japan after the Meiji Restoration (beginning in the 1860s). It also examines the controversy surrounding Japanese philosophy towards the end of the Pacific War (1945), and its renewal in the contemporary context. The post-Meiji thinkers engaged themselves with the questions of universality and particularity; the former represented science, medicine, technology, and philosophy (understood as ) and the latter, the Japanese non-Western tradition. Within (...)
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  • The Art of Aidagara : Ethics, Aesthetics, and the Quest for an Ontology of Social Existence in Watsuji Tetsurō's Rinrigaku.James M. Shields - 2009 - Asian Philosophy 19 (3):265-283.
    This paper provides an analysis of the key term aidagara ('betweenness') in the philosophical ethics of Watsuji Tetsurō (1889-1960), in response to and in light of the recent movement in Japanese Buddhist studies known as 'Critical Buddhism'. The Critical Buddhist call for a turn away from 'topical' or intuitionist thinking and towards (properly Buddhist) 'critical' thinking, while problematic in its bipolarity, raises the important issue of the place of 'reason' vs 'intuition' in Japanese Buddhist ethics. In this paper, a comparison (...)
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  • The Sōtō Sect and Japanese Military Imperialism in Korea.Nam-lin Hur - 1999 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 26 (1-2):107-134.