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Terrorism and war

The Journal of Ethics 8 (1):59-75 (2004)

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  1. Globalization, Terrorism, and Morality: A Critique of Jean Baudrillard.Meutia Irina Mukhlis & Naupal - forthcoming - Intellectual Discourse:89-108.
    This paper challenges the claim, made by French sociologist andphilosopher, Jean Baudrillard in The Spirit of Terrorism, that contemporary“Islamic” terrorism as exemplified by the 9/11 attacks in the United States isa phenomenon that defies morality. By considering alternative explanationsand applying a thought experiment, we find that Baudrillard’s claim shouldbe rejected because it is based on invalid premises and inconsistencies.The problematic premises include Baudrillard’s statements that terror is aneffective strategy and the only means available to marginalized group seekingto oppose Western globalization. (...)
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  • Violence and Publicity: Constructions of Political Responsibility After 9/11.Clive Barnett - 2009 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 12 (3):353-375.
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  • Jus Ad Bellum After 9/11: A State of the Art Report.Mark Rigstad - 2007 - International Political Theory Beacon.
    An examination of the applicability of conventional and revisionist just war principles to the global war on terror.
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  • Can Terrorism Be Justified?Tomis Kapitan - unknown
    My concern today is with the last of these questions. But, it is virtually impossible to say anything intelligent about this matter unless some effort is made to delineate the phenomenon under scrutiny. So I will begin by addressing the first question, and this requires that something be said about the semantics and pragmatics of the terms, ‘terrorism’ and ‘terrorist’.
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  • The Criminalization of Money Laundering and Terrorism in Global Contexts: A Hybrid Solution.J. B. Delston - 2014 - Journal of Global Ethics 10 (3):326-338.
    What obligations do global actors have to prevent terrorism? Is consent required to create an international obligation, or does the correctness of its goals ground its legitimacy? In this paper, I consider these questions with respect to a subset of international law often overlooked: anti-money laundering and combating the financing of terrorism . AML/CFT comprises peaceful response to violence and terrorism, making it a significant component of international justice and diplomacy. First, I present the current legal framework for AML/CFT institutions (...)
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  • ‘Talking Peace – Going to War’: Peace in the Service of the Israeli Just War Rhetoric.Dalia Gavriely-Nuri - 2014 - Critical Discourse Studies 11 (1):1-18.
    This article offers a cultural approach to critical discourse analysis of major addresses made by Israeli leaders before the initiation of new wars between 1982 and 2008. The article reveals an intriguing phenomenon: the intensive use of the word ‘peace’ in these texts. The article's central claim is that the word ‘peace’ is an integral part of the Israeli just war rhetoric, a phenomenon that can be termed: Peace in the Service of War. PSW aims at rationalizing and legitimizing war (...)
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  • Terrorism, War, and The Killing of the Innocent.Troy Jollimore - 2007 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (4):353-372.
    Commonsense moral thought holds that what makes terrorism particularly abhorrent is the fact that it tends to be directed toward innocent victims. Yet contemporary philosophers tend to doubt that the concept of innocence plays any significant role here, and to deny that prohibitions against targeting noncombatants can be justified through appeal to their moral innocence. I argue, however, that the arguments used to support these doubts are ultimately unsuccessful. Indeed, the philosophical positions in question tend to misunderstand the justification of (...)
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  • Terror.Tomis Kapitan - unknown
    Any intelligent discussion of terrorism must demarcate its subject matter, for the term ‘terrorism’ is differently understood and where there is no accord on its meaning there is little chance for agreement on its application or normative status. The best course is to sketch a morally neutral definition that classifies as ‘terrorist’ as many widely-agreed upon cases as possible. Definitions that explicitly render terrorism illegitimate make classification contentious, and it is more informative to base moral assessment on an examination of (...)
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  • The Senses of Terrorism.Mark Rigstad - 2008 - Review Journal of Political Philosophy 6:1-36.
    This articles exposes the methodological errors involved in attempting to operationalize or value-neutralize the concept of 'terrorism.' It defends, instead, an effects-based approach to the taxonomy of 'terrorism' that builds out from a central conceptual connection between the term's negative connotation and a widely shared moral presumption against the killing of innocent non-combatants. Although this approach to the core meaning of 'terrorism' is far from value-neutral, it has a number of virtues to recommend it. First, it has the political virtue (...)
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  • Killing Civilians.Gerhard Overland - 2005 - European Journal of Philosophy 13 (3):345-363.
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  • Monkeywrenching, Perverse Incentives and Ecodefence.Derek D. Turner - 2006 - Environmental Values 15 (2):213 - 232.
    By focusing too narrowly on consequentialist arguments for ecosabotage, environmental philosophers such as Michael Martin (1990) and Thomas Young (2001) have tended to overlook two important facts about monkeywrenching. First, advocates of monkeywrenching see sabotage above all as a technique for counteracting perverse economic incentives. Second, their main argument for monkeywrenching – which I will call the ecodefence argument – is not consequentialist at all. After calling attention to these two under-appreciated aspects of monkeywrenching, I go on to offer a (...)
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  • What is Terrorism, Why is It Wrong, and Could It Ever Be Morally Permissible?Alison M. Jaggar - 2005 - Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (2):202–217.
    In the liberal democracies of North America and the European Union, terrorism is almost universally condemned. Moreover, few wish to question the“moral clarity” that denies any “moral equivalence” between terrorists and thosewho fight them (Held 2004, 59–60). However, the seeming consensus on the moral reprehensibility of terrorism is undermined by substantial disagreementabout just what terrorism is. The primary purpose of this paper is to propose an account of terrorism capable of facilitating a more productive moral debate. I conclude by opening—though (...)
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  • Terrorism, Shared Rules and Trust.Matthew Noah Smith - 2008 - Journal of Political Philosophy 16 (2):201–219.
  • Is Terrorism Morally Distinctive?Samuel Scheffler - 2006 - Journal of Political Philosophy 14 (1):1-17.