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  1. “It’s Like Hating Puppies!” Employee Disengagement and Corporate Social Responsibility.Kelsy Hejjas, Graham Miller & Caroline Scarles - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 157 (2):319-337.
    Corporate social responsibility has been linked with numerous organizational advantages, including recruitment, retention, productivity, and morale, which relate specifically to employees. However, despite specific benefits of CSR relating to employees and their importance as a stakeholder group, it is noteworthy that a lack of attention has been paid to the individual level of analysis with CSR primarily being studied at the organizational level. Both research and practice of CSR have largely treated the individual organization as a “black box,” failing to (...)
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  • Corporate Humanistic Responsibility: Social Performance Through Managerial Discretion of the HRM.Stéphanie Arnaud & David M. Wasieleski - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 120 (3):1-22.
    The Corporate Social Performance (CSP) model (Wood, Acad Manag Rev 164:691–718, 1991) assesses a firm’s social responsibility at three levels of analysis—institutional, organizational and individual—and measures the resulting social outcomes. In this paper, we focus on the individual level of CSP, manifested in the managerial discretion of a firm’s principles, processes, and policies regarding social responsibilities. Specifically, we address the human resources management of employees as a way of promoting CSR values and producing socially minded outcomes. We show that applying (...)
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  • The Influence of an Organisation’s Corporate Values on Employees Personal Buying Behaviour.Jesús Cambra-Fierro, Yolanda Polo-Redondo & Alan Wilson - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):157 - 167.
    This article explores the influence that an organisation’s corporate values have on employees’ behaviour and values both within and outside the work environment. In particular, it focuses on the impact of these values on the personal buying behaviour of employees. The empirical research was undertaken within a case study organisation that produces wine in Spain and involved interviews with senior management, an analysis of company documentation, as well as group discussions with employees supported by an employee survey. The article argues (...)
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  • Somebody That I Used to Know: The Immediate and Long-Term Effects of Social Identity in Post-Disaster Business Communities.Jenni Dinger, Michael Conger, David Hekman & Carla Bustamante - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
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  • Employee Participation in Cause-Related Marketing Strategies: A Study of Management Perceptions From British Consumer Service Industries.Gordon Liu, Catherine Liston-Heyes & Wai-Wai Ko - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (2):195-210.
    The purpose of cause-related marketing (CRM) is to publicise and capitalise on a firm's corporate social performance (CSP) by enhancing its legitimacy in the eyes of its stakeholders. This study focuses on the firm's internal stakeholders - i.e. its employees - and the extent of their involvement in the selection of social campaigns. Whilst the difficulties of managing a firm that has lost or damaged its legitimacy in the eyes of its employees are well known, little is understood about the (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility and Organizational Psychology: An Integrative Review.Ante Glavas - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Conceptualizing the International For-Profit Social Entrepreneur.R. Scott Marshall - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (2):183 - 198.
    This article looks at social entrepreneurs that operate for-profit and internationally, offering that international for-profit social entrepreneurs (IFPSE) are of a unique type. Initially, this article utilizes the entrepreneurship, social entrepreneurship, and international entrepreneurship literatures to develop a definition of the IFPSE. Next, a proposed model of the IFPSE is built utilizing the dimensions of mindset, opportunity recognition, social networks, and outcomes. Case studies of three IFPSE are then used to examine the proposed model. In the final section, findings from (...)
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  • The Power of One to Make a Difference: How Informal and Formal CEO Power Affect Environmental Sustainability.Judith L. Walls & Pascual Berrone - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 145 (2):293-308.
    We theoretically discuss and empirically show how CEO power based on environmental expertise and formal influence over executives and directors, in the absence and presence of shareholder activism, spurs firms toward greener strategies. Our results support the idea that CEOs with informal power, grounded in expertise, reduce corporate environmental impact and this relationship is amplified when the CEO also enjoys formal power over the board of directors. Additionally, we found that any source of CEO power, whether informal or formal, is (...)
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  • Do Personal Values Influence the Propensity for Sustainability Actions? A Policy-Capturing Study.Joel Marcus, Heather A. MacDonald & Lorne M. Sulsky - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (2):459-478.
    Using a policy-capturing approach with a broad student sample we examine how individuals’ economic, social and environmental values influence their propensity to engage in a broad range of sustainability-related corporate actions. We employ a multi-dimensional sustainability framework of corporate actions and account for both the positive and negative impacts associated with corporate activity—termed strength and concern actions, respectively. Strong economic values were found to increase the propensity for concern actions and the willingness to work in controversial industries. Individuals with balanced (...)
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  • An Analysis of Corporate Social Responsibility at Credit Line: A Narrative Approach.Michael Humphreys & Andrew D. Brown - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (3):403-418.
    This article presents the results of an inductive, interpretive case study. We have adopted a narrative approach to the analysis of organizational processes in order to explore how individuals in a financial institution dealt with relatively novel issues of corporate social responsibility (CSR). The narratives that we reconstruct, which we label 'idealism and altruism', 'economics and expedience' and 'ignorance and cynicism' illustrate how people in the specific organizational context of a bank ('Credit Line') sought to cope with an attempt at (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility as Shaped by Managers’ Role Dissonance: Cleaning Services Procurement in Israel.Galit Segev, Sarit Nisim & Orly Benjamin - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (1):209-221.
    Public procurement provides an excellent window into the shaping of corporate social responsibility of companies contracted by the government. To this emerging scholarly realization, we want to add that public procurement provides also the opportunity to examine corporate social responsibility as practiced by public sector organizations. This opportunity enables the investigation of the conditions under which public sector organizations endorse CSR guidelines, adherence to which demonstrates accountability for their service providers’ legal, employment-related practices. Our study examined the possibility that public (...)
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  • Responsibility Beyond CSR.David Bevan, Hervé Corvellec & Eric Faÿ - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (S1):1-4.
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  • Mid-Management, Employee Engagement, and the Generation of Reliable Sustainable Corporate Social Responsibility.Lynn Godkin - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (1):15-28.
    This paper explains how middle managers might enlist ethically engaged employees into the production of reliable, sustainable CSR. An accompanying model illustrates how those managers can encounter employee engagement in CSR and channel their enthusiasm effectively. It presents factors scaffolding organizational support for employee engagement and how they relate to the intensity of that engagement. It introduces the importance of employee voice and illustrates how associated signals might be captured.
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  • Congruence in Corporate Social Responsibility: Connecting the Identity and Behavior of Employers and Employees.Debbie Haski-Leventhal, Lonneke Roza & Lucas C. P. M. Meijs - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (1):35-51.
    The multi-disciplinary interest in social responsibility on the part of individuals and organizations over the past 30 years has generated several descriptors of corporate social responsibility and employee social responsibility. These descriptors focus largely on socially responsible behavior and, in some cases, on socially responsible identity. Very few authors have combined the two concepts in researching social responsibility. This situation can lead to an oversimplification of the concept of CSR, thereby impeding the examination of congruence between employees and organizations with (...)
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  • Working with Corporate Social Responsibility in Brazilian Companies: The Role of Managers' Values in the Maintenance of CSR Cultures. [REVIEW]Fernanda Duarte - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (3):355 - 368.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) refers to the duty of management to consider and respond to issues beyond the organization's economic and legal requirements in line with social and environmental values. However, 'management' is constituted by real people responsible for routine decisions and formulation and implementation of policies. It can be said therefore that the ethical ideals and beliefs of these individuals - in particular their personal values - play an important role in their decisions. It is contended in this article (...)
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  • Rethinking the Space of Ethics in Social Entrepreneurship: Power, Subjectivity, and Practices of Freedom.Pascal Dey & Chris Steyaert - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (4):627-641.
    This article identifies power, subjectivity, and practices of freedom as neglected but significant elements for understanding the ethics of social entrepreneurship. While the ethics of social entrepreneurship is typically conceptualized in conjunction with innate properties or moral commitments of the individual, we problematize this view based on its presupposition of an essentialist conception of the authentic subject. We offer, based on Foucault’s ethical oeuvre, a practice-based alternative which sees ethics as being exercised through a critical and creative dealing with the (...)
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  • A Falling of the Veils: Turning Points and Momentous Turning Points in Leadership and the Creation of CSR.Christine A. Hemingway & Ken Starkey - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (4):875-890.
    This article uses the life stories approach to leadership and leadership development. Using exploratory, qualitative data from a Forbes Global 2000 and FTSE 100 company, we discuss the role of the turning point as an important antecedent of leadership in corporate social responsibility. We argue that TPs are causally efficacious, linking them to the development of life narratives concerned with an evolving sense of personal identity. Using both a multi-disciplinary perspective and a multi-level focus on CSR leadership, we identify four (...)
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  • Managerial Mindsets Toward Corporate Social Responsibility: The Case of Auto Industry in Iran.Ebrahim Soltani, Jawad Syed, Ying-Ying Liao & Abdullah Iqbal - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 129 (4):795-810.
    Despite a plethora of empirical evidence on the potential role of senior management in the success of corporate social responsibility in Western-dominated organizational contexts, little attempt has been made to document the various managerial mindsets toward CSR in organizations in Muslim-dominated countries in the Middle East region. To address this existing lacuna of theoretical and empirical research in CSR management, this paper offers a qualitative case study of CSR in three manufacturing firms operating in Iran’s auto industry. Based on an (...)
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  • Activism and Abdication on the Inside: The Effect of Everyday Practice on Corporate Responsibility.Michal Carrington, Detlev Zwick & Benjamin Neville - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-27.
    While mainstream CSR research has generally explored and argued for positive ethical, social and environmental performance, critical CSR scholars argue that change has been superficial—at best, and not possible in any substantial way within the current capitalist system. Both views, however, only address the role of business within larger systems. Little attention has been paid to the everyday material CSR practice of individual managers. We go inside the firm to investigate how the micro-level acts of individual managers can aggregate to (...)
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  • Exploring Employee Engagement with Social Responsibility: A Social Exchange Perspective on Organisational Participation.R. E. Slack, S. Corlett & R. Morris - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (3):537-548.
    Corporate social responsibility is a recognised and common part of business activity. Some of the regularly cited motives behind CSR are employee morale, recruitment and retention, with employees acknowledged as a key organisational stakeholder. Despite the significance of employees in relation to CSR, relatively few studies have examined their engagement with CSR and the impediments relevant to this engagement. This exploratory case study-based research addresses this paucity of attention, drawing on one to one interviews and observation in a large UK (...)
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  • Moral Degradation, Business Ethics, and Corporate Social Responsibility in a Transitional Economy.Qinqin Zheng, Yadong Luo & Stephanie Lu Wang - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 120 (3):405-421.
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  • Ethical Values and Environmentalism in China: Comparing Employees From State-Owned and Private Firms.Rosa Chun - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (S3):341 - 348.
    Industrial pollution is of both national and international concern in the context where one country's emissions contribute to the problem of global warming. Existing studies have focused on government and regulations rather than on employees. The context of this study is in respect of 472 workers in seven Chinese energy companies in Shanxi province in China, one of the biggest coal mining regions and a region most responsible for environmental pollution. The key findings are two-fold: first, employees' values were positively (...)
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  • Making Sense of Corporate Social Responsibility and Work.Ami N. Seivwright & Kerrie L. Unsworth - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Human Development and the Pursuit of the Common Good: Social Psychology or Aristotelian Virtue Ethics? [REVIEW]Felix Martin - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 100 (S1):89-98.
    The encyclical proclaims the centrality of human development, which includes acting with gratuitousness and solidarity in pursuing the common good. This paper considers first whether such relationships of gratuitousness and solidarity can be analysed through the prism of traditional theories of social psychology, which are highly influential in current management research, and concludes that certain aspects of those theories may offer useful tools for analysis at the practical level. This is contrasted with the analysis of such relationships through Aristotelian virtue (...)
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  • Designing and Implementing Corporate Social Responsibility: An Integrative Framework Grounded in Theory and Practice. [REVIEW]François Maon, Adam Lindgreen & Valérie Swaen - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):71 - 89.
    This article introduces an integrative framework of corporate social responsibility (CSR) design and implementation. A review of CSR literature -in particular with regard to design and implementation models -provides the background to develop a multiple case study. The resulting integrative framework, based on this multiple case study and Lewin's change model, highlights four stages that span nine steps of the CSR design and implementation process. Finally, the study identifies critical success factors for the CSR process.
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  • Collective Social Entrepreneurship: Collaboratively Shaping Social Good. [REVIEW]A. Wren Montgomery, Peter A. Dacin & M. Tina Dacin - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (3):375-388.
    In this paper, we move beyond the typical focus on the role of individuals in leading social change to examine "collective social entrepreneurship", the role multiple actors collaboratively play to address social problems, create new institutions, and dismantle outdated institutional arrangements. Specifically, we examine collective social entrepreneurship across a diverse range of collaborative activities including movements, alliances and markets for social good. We identify resource utilization approaches and three associated sets of activities that illustrate the work of collective social entrepreneurs—framing, (...)
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  • Virtue Ethics and the Practice–Institution Schema: An Ethical Case of Excellent Business Practices.Ying Wang, George Cheney & Juliet Roper - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (1):67-77.
    This paper aims to contribute to a greater understanding of the theory of virtue ethics and its applications in the business arena. In contrast to other prominent approaches to ethics, virtue ethics provides a useful perspective in making sense of various business ethics issues with an emphasis on the moral character of the individuals and its transformational influences in driving ethical business conduct. Building on Geoff Moore’s :19–32, 2002; Bus Ethics Q 15:237–255, 2005; Bus Ethics Q 18:483–511, 2008) treatment of (...)
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  • Seriously Personal: The Reasons That Motivate Entrepreneurs to Address Climate Change.Kaesehage Katharina, Leyshon Michael, Ferns George & Leyshon Catherine - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
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  • Environmental Respect: Ethics or Simply Business? A Study in the Small and Medium Enterprise (Sme) Context. [REVIEW]Jesús Cambra-Fierro, Susan Hart & Yolanda Polo-Redondo - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):645 - 656.
    In recent years there have been ever-growing concerns regarding environmental decline, causing some companies to focus on the implementation of environmentally friendly supply, production and distribution systems. Such concern may stem either from the set of beliefs and values of the company’s management or from certain pressure exerted by the market – consumers and institutions – in the belief that an environmentally respectful management policy will contribute to the transmission of a positive image of the company and its products. Sometimes, (...)
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  • Values and the Perceived Importance of Ethics and Social Responsibility: The U.S. Versus China.William E. Shafer, Kyoko Fukukawa & Grace Meina Lee - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (3):265-284.
    This study examines the effects of nationality (U.S. vs. China) and personal values on managers’ responses to the Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility (PRESOR) scale. Evidence that China’s transition to a socialist market economy has led to widespread business corruption, led us to hypothesize that People’s Republic of China (PRC) managers would believe less strongly in the importance of ethical and socially responsible business conduct. We also hypothesized that after controlling for national differences, managers’ personal values (more specifically, (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility in Challenging and Non-Enabling Institutional Contexts: Do Institutional Voids Matter?Kenneth Amaeshi, Emmanuel Adegbite & Tazeeb Rajwani - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (1):135-153.
    The extant literature on comparative Corporate Social Responsibility often assumes functioning and enabling institutional arrangements, such as strong government, market and civil society, as a necessary condition for responsible business practices. Setting aside this dominant assumption and drawing insights from a case study of Fidelity Bank, Nigeria, we explore why and how firms still pursue and enact responsible business practices in what could be described as challenging and non-enabling institutional contexts for CSR. Our findings suggest that responsible business practices in (...)
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  • A Resource-Based View of Social Entrepreneurship: How Stewardship Culture Benefits Scale of Social Impact.Sophie Bacq & Kimberly A. Eddleston - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (3):589-611.
    Despite efforts to address societal ills, social enterprises face challenges in increasing their impact. Drawing from the RBV, we argue that a social enterprise’s scale of social impact depends on its capabilities to engage stakeholders, attract government support, and generate earned-income. We test our hypotheses on a sample of 171 US-based social enterprises and find support for the hypothesized relationships between these organizational capabilities and scale of social impact. Further, we find that these relationships are contingent upon stewardship culture. Specifically, (...)
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  • Connecting the Micro to the Macro: An Exploration of Micro-Behaviors of Individuals Who Drive CSR Initiatives at the Macro-Level.Latha Poonamallee & Simy Joy - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • The Influence of an Organisation’s Corporate Values on Employees Personal Buying Behaviour.Jesús Cambra-Fierro, Yolanda Polo-Redondo & Alan Wilson - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):157-167.
    This article explores the influence that an organisation's corporate values have on employees' behaviour and values both within and outside the work environment. In particular, it focuses on the impact of these values on the personal buying behaviour of employees. The empirical research was undertaken within a case study organisation that produces wine in Spain and involved interviews with senior management, an analysis of company documentation, as well as group discussions with employees supported by an employee survey. The article argues (...)
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  • Environmental Respect: Ethics or Simply Business? A Study in the Small and Medium Enterprise Context.Jesús Cambra-Fierro, Susan Hart & Yolanda Polo-Redondo - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):645-656.
    In recent years there have been evergrowing concerns regarding environmental decline, causing some companies to focus on the implementation of environmentally friendly supply, production and distribution systems. Such concern may stem either from the set of beliefs and values of the company's management or from certain pressure exerted by the market - consumers and institutions - in the belief that an environmentally respectful management policy will contribute to the transmission of a positive image of the company and its products. Sometimes, (...)
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  • Predictor of Business Students’ Attitudes Toward Sustainable Business Practices.Eddy S. Ng & Ronald J. Burke - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):603-615.
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  • Predictor of Business Students' Attitudes Toward Sustainable Business Practices.Eddy S. Ng & Ronald J. Burke - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):603 - 615.
    This study examined individual difference characteristics as predictors of business students' attitudes toward sustainable business practices. Three types of predictors were considered: personal values, individualism—collectivism, and leadership styles. Data were collected from 248 business students attending a mid-sized university in western United States using self-reported questionnaires. Few gender differences were present.Hierarchical regression analyses, controlling for personal demographic characteristics, indicated that business students scoring higher on Rokeach's social value scale, collectivism, and transformational leadership also reported more positive attitudes toward sustainable business (...)
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  • Working with Corporate Social Responsibility in Brazilian Companies: The Role of Managers’ Values in the Maintenance of CSR Cultures.Fernanda Duarte - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (3):355-368.
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  • Do Employees Care About CSR Programs? A Typology of Employees According to Their Attitudes.Pablo Rodrigo & Daniel Arenas - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (2):265-283.
    This paper examines employees’ reactions to Corporate Social Responsibility programs at the attitudinal level. The results presented are drawn from an in-depth study of two Chilean construction firms that have well-established CSR programs. Grounded theory was applied to the data prior to the construction of the conceptual framework. The analysis shows that the implementation of CSR programs generates two types of attitudes in employees: attitudes toward the organization and attitudes toward society. These two broad types of attitudes can then be (...)
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  • A Cognitive Elaboration Model of Sustainability Decision Making: Investigating Financial Managers’ Orientation Toward Environmental Issues.Edina Eberhardt-Toth & David M. Wasieleski - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (4):735-751.
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  • The Role of 'High Potentials' in Integrating and Implementing Corporate Social Responsibility.Adam Lindgreen, Valérie Swaen, David Harness & Marieke Hoffmann - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (S1):73-91.
    The Samenleving and Bedrijf (S&B) network of Dutch organizations seeks to embed corporate social responsibility (CSR) within business practices but faces challenges with regard to how to do so across various organizational practices, processes, and policies. The integration of CSR demands cultural change driven by senior management and other change agents, who push CSR principles throughout the organization. This study examines the change processes that S&B member organizations have initiated, with a particular focus on the role of high potentials—those persons (...)
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