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  1. To Whistleblow or Not to Whistleblow: Affective and Cognitive Differences in Reporting Peers and Advisors.Tristan McIntosh, Cory Higgs, Megan Turner, Paul Partlow, Logan Steele, Alexandra E. MacDougall, Shane Connelly & Michael D. Mumford - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (1):171-210.
    Traditional whistleblowing theories have purported that whistleblowers engage in a rational process in determining whether or not to blow the whistle on misconduct. However, stressors inherent to whistleblowing often impede rational thinking and act as a barrier to effective whistleblowing. The negative impact of these stressors on whistleblowing may be made worse depending on who engages in the misconduct: a peer or advisor. In the present study, participants are presented with an ethical scenario where either a peer or advisor engages (...)
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  • Ethical Awareness, Ethical Judgment and Whistleblowing: A Moderated Mediation Analysis.Hengky Latan, Charbel Jose Chiappetta Jabbour & Ana Beatriz Lopes de Sousa Jabbour - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (1):289-304.
    This study aims to examine the ethical decision-making model proposed by Schwartz, where we consider the factors of non-rationality and aspects that affect ethical judgments of auditors to make the decision to blow the whistle. In this paper, we argue that the intention of whistleblowing depends on ethical awareness and ethical judgment as well as there is a mediation–moderation due to emotion and perceived moral intensity of auditors. Data were collected using an online survey with 162 external auditors who worked (...)
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  • The Motivations of External Whistleblowers and Their Impact on the Intention to Blow the Whistle Again.Heungsik Park & David Lewis - forthcoming - Business Ethics: A European Review.
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  • Responding to Value Pluralism in Hybrid Organizations.Erin I. Castellas, Wendy Stubbs & Véronique Ambrosini - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-16.
    In this paper, we derive a four-stage process model of how hybrid organizations respond to specific challenges that arise under conditions of value pluralism and institutional complexity. Engaging in exploratory qualitative research of six Australian hybrid organizations, we identify institutional and organizational responses to pluralism, particularly as organizations strive to uphold multiple value commitments, such as social, environmental and/or financial outcomes. We find that by employing a process of separating, negotiating, aggregating, and subjectively assessing the value that is created, our (...)
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  • The Joint Effects of Machiavellianism and Ethical Environment on Whistle-Blowing.Derek Dalton & Robin R. Radtke - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):153-172.
    Given the importance of the Machiavellianism construct on informing a wide range of ethics research, we focus on gaining a better understanding of Machiavellianism within the whistle-blower context. In this regard, we examine the effect of Machiavellianism on whistle-blowing, focusing on the underlying mechanisms through which Machiavellianism affects whistle-blowing. Further, because individuals who are higher in Machiavellianism (high Machs) are expected to be less likely to report wrongdoing, we examine the ability of an organization’s ethical environment to increase whistle-blowing intentions (...)
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  • What’s in It for Me? An Examination of Accounting Students’ Likelihood to Report Faculty Misconduct.Joanne C. Jones, Gary Spraakman & Cristóbal Sánchez-Rodríguez - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (4):645-667.
  • Prediction of Whistleblowing or Non-Reporting Observation: The Role of Personal and Situational Factors. [REVIEW]P. G. Cassematis & R. Wortley - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (3):615-634.
    This study examined whether it was possible to classify Australian public sector employees as either whistleblowers or non-reporting observers using personal and situational variables. The personal variables were demography (gender, public sector tenure, organisational tenure and age), work attitudes (job satisfaction, trust in management, whistleblowing propensity) and employee behaviour (organisational citizenship behaviour). The situational variables were perceived personal victimisation, fear of reprisals and perceived wrongdoing seriousness. These variables were used as predictors in a series of binary logistic regressions. It was (...)
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  • Culture Corrupts! A Qualitative Study of Organizational Culture in Corrupt Organizations.Jamie-Lee Campbell & Anja S. Göritz - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 120 (3):1-21.
    Although theory refers to organizational culture as an important variable in corrupt organizations, only little empirical research has addressed the characteristics of a corrupt organizational culture. Besides some characteristics that go hand in hand with unethical behavior and other features of corrupt organizations, we are still not able to describe a corrupt organizational culture in terms of its underlying assumptions, values, and norms. With a qualitative approach, we studied similarities of organizational culture across different corrupt organizations. In this study, we (...)
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  • Influence of Ethical Position on Whistleblowing Behaviour: Do Preferred Channels in Private and Public Sectors Differ?Dilek Zamantılı Nayır, Michael T. Rehg & Yurdanur Asa - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 149 (1):147-167.
    Whistleblowing refers to the disclosure by organization members of illegal, immoral, or illegitimate practices to persons or organizations that may be able to effect action. Most studies on the topic have been conducted in North American or European private sector organizations, and less attention has been paid to regions such as Turkey. In this study, we study the whistleblowing intentions and channel choices of Turkish employees in private and public sector organizations. Using data from 327 private sector and 405 public (...)
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  • Environmental Factors Contributing to Wrongdoing in Medicine: A Criterion-Based Review of Studies and Cases.James M. DuBois, Emily E. Anderson, Kelly Carroll, Tyler Gibb, Elena Kraus, Timothy Rubbelke & Meghan Vasher - 2012 - Ethics and Behavior 22 (3):163 - 188.
    In this article we describe our approach to understanding wrongdoing in medical research and practice, which involves the statistical analysis of coded data from a large set of published cases. We focus on understanding the environmental factors that predict the kind and the severity of wrongdoing in medicine. Through review of empirical and theoretical literature, consultation with experts, the application of criminological theory, and ongoing analysis of our first 60 cases, we hypothesize that 10 contextual features of the medical environment (...)
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  • When Does a Proactive Personality Enhance an Employee’s Whistle-Blowing Intention?: A Cross-Level Investigation of the Employees in Chinese Companies.Yan Liu, Shuming Zhao, Li Jiang & Rui Li - 2016 - Ethics and Behavior 26 (8):660-677.
    To identify the boundary conditions for proactive employees making whistle-blowing decisions, we developed a cross-level model comprising employee proactive personality and two types of whistle-blowing intentions that incorporates the influences of organizational- and individual-level attributes. Analyses of data collected from 432 Chinese employees in 32 companies indicated that proactive personality was positively related to internal whistle-blowing intention and even more positively related to external whistle-blowing intention when individuals were working in organizations characterized by an instrumental ethical climate and employees with (...)
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  • The Evolution of Whistleblowing Studies: A Critical Review and Research Agenda.Barbara Culiberg & Katarina Katja Mihelič - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (4):787-803.
    Whistleblowing is a controversial yet socially significant topic of interest due to its impact on employees, organizations, and society at large. The purpose of this paper is to integrate knowledge of whistleblowing with theoretical advancements in the broader domain of business ethics to propose a novel approach to research and practice engaged in this complex phenomenon. The paper offers a conceptual framework, i.e., the wheel of whistleblowing, that is developed to portray the different features of whistleblowing by applying the whistleblower’s (...)
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  • Leader Ethical Decision-Making in Organizations: Strategies for Sensemaking. [REVIEW]Chase E. Thiel, Zhanna Bagdasarov, Lauren Harkrider, James F. Johnson & Michael D. Mumford - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 107 (1):49-64.
    Organizational leaders face environmental challenges and pressures that put them under ethical risk. Navigating this ethical risk is demanding given the dynamics of contemporary organizations. Traditional models of ethical decision-making (EDM) are an inadequate framework for understanding how leaders respond to ethical dilemmas under conditions of uncertainty and equivocality. Sensemaking models more accurately illustrate leader EDM and account for individual, social, and environmental constraints. Using the sensemaking approach as a foundation, previous EDM models are revised and extended to comprise a (...)
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  • Let the Story Go: The Role of Emotion in the Decision-Making Process of the Reluctant, Vulnerable Witness or Whistle-Blower. [REVIEW]James Hollings - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (3):501-512.
    This paper draws on cognitive psychological theory to explain the role of emotion in the decision-making process of four reluctant, vulnerable witnesses to wrongdoing, who were persuaded to blow the whistle on matters of substantial public interest. It proposes a theoretical explanation for the role of emotion on whistle-blower or witness decision-making, based on the Iterative Reprocessing Model and drawing on appraisal-based theories of cognitive psychology. It concludes that the decision to speak is preceded by an intense emotional episode, probably (...)
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  • Authentic Leadership and Whistleblowing: Mediating Roles of Psychological Safety and Personal Identification.Sheng-min Liu, Jian-Qiao Liao & Hongguo Wei - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 131 (1):107-119.
  • The Influence of an Observer’s Value Orientation and Personality Type on Attitudes Toward Whistleblowing.Heungsik Park, John Blenkinsopp & Myeongsil Park - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 120 (1):121-129.