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  1. The Past, Present, and Future of Informed Consent in Research and Translational Medicine.Susan M. Wolf, Ellen Wright Clayton & Frances Lawrenz - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (1):7-11.
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  • Mapping the Ethics of Translational Genomics: Situating Return of Results and Navigating the Research‐Clinical Divide.Susan M. Wolf, Wylie Burke & Barbara A. Koenig - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (3):486-501.
    Both bioethics and law have governed human genomics by distinguishing research from clinical practice. Yet the rise of translational genomics now makes this traditional dichotomy inadequate. This paper pioneers a new approach to the ethics of translational genomics. It maps the full range of ethical approaches needed, proposes a “layered” approach to determining the ethics framework for projects combining research and clinical care, and clarifies the key role that return of results can play in advancing translation.
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  • Integrating Rules for Genomic Research, Clinical Care, Public Health Screening and DTC Testing: Creating Translational Law for Translational Genomics.Susan M. Wolf, Pilar N. Ossorio, Susan A. Berry, Henry T. Greely, Amy L. McGuire, Michelle A. Penny & Sharon F. Terry - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (1):69-86.
    Human genomics is a translational field spanning research, clinical care, public health, and direct-to-consumer testing. However, law differs across these domains on issues including liability, consent, promoting quality of analysis and interpretation, and safeguarding privacy. Genomic activities crossing domains can thus encounter confusion and conflicts among these approaches. This paper suggests how to resolve these conflicts while protecting the rights and interests of individuals sequenced. Translational genomics requires this more translational approach to law.
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  • Old Challenges or New Issues? Genetic Health Professionals’ Experiences Obtaining Informed Consent in Diagnostic Genomic Sequencing.Danya F. Vears, Pascal Borry, Julian Savulescu & Julian J. Koplin - 2021 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 12 (1):12-23.
    Background While integrating genomic sequencing into clinical care carries clear medical benefits, it also raises difficult ethical questions. Compared to traditional sequencing technologies, genomic sequencing and analysis is more likely to identify unsolicited findings (UF) and variants that cannot be classified as benign or disease-causing (variants of uncertain significance; VUS). UF and VUS pose new challenges for genetic health professionals (GHPs) who are obtaining informed consent for genomic sequencing from patients.Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with 31 GHPs across Europe, Australia (...)
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  • Old Challenges or New Issues? Genetic Health Professionals’ Experiences Obtaining Informed Consent in Diagnostic Genomic Sequencing.Danya F. Vears, Pascal Borry, Julian Savulescu & Julian J. Koplin - 2021 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 12 (1):12-23.
    Background While integrating genomic sequencing into clinical care carries clear medical benefits, it also raises difficult ethical questions. Compared to traditional sequencing technologies, genomic sequencing and analysis is more likely to identify unsolicited findings (UF) and variants that cannot be classified as benign or disease-causing (variants of uncertain significance; VUS). UF and VUS pose new challenges for genetic health professionals (GHPs) who are obtaining informed consent for genomic sequencing from patients.Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with 31 GHPs across Europe, Australia (...)
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  • Model consent clauses for rare disease research.Minh Thu Nguyen, Jack Goldblatt, Rosario Isasi, Marlene Jagut, Anneliene Hechtelt Jonker, Petra Kaufmann, Laetitia Ouillade, Fruszina Molnar-Gabor, Mahsa Shabani, Eric Sid, Anne Marie Tassé, Durhane Wong-Rieger & Bartha Maria Knoppers - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):1-7.
    Rare Disease research has seen tremendous advancements over the last decades, with the development of new technologies, various global collaborative efforts and improved data sharing. To maximize the impact of and to further build on these developments, there is a need for model consent clauses for rare diseases research, in order to improve data interoperability, to meet the informational needs of participants, and to ensure proper ethical and legal use of data sources and participants’ overall protection. A global Task Force (...)
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  • From Genetics to Genomics: Facing the Liability Implications in Clinical Care.Gary Marchant, Mark Barnes, James P. Evans, Bonnie LeRoy & Susan M. Wolf - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (1):11-43.
    Health care is transitioning from genetics to genomics, in which single-gene testing for diagnosis is being replaced by multi-gene panels, genome-wide sequencing, and other multi-genic tests for disease diagnosis, prediction, prognosis, and treatment. This health care transition is spurring a new set of increased or novel liability risks for health care providers and test laboratories. This article describes this transition in both medical care and liability, and addresses 11 areas of potential increased or novel liability risk, offering recommendations to both (...)
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  • Informed Consent in Translational Genomics: Insufficient Without Trustworthy Governance.Wylie Burke, Laura M. Beskow, Susan Brown Trinidad, Stephanie M. Fullerton & Kathleen Brelsford - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (1):79-86.
    Neither the range of potential results from genomic research that might be returned to participants nor future uses of stored data and biospecimens can be fully predicted at the outset of a study. Informed consent procedures require clear explanations about how and by whom decisions are made and what principles and criteria apply. To ensure trustworthy research governance, there is also a need for empirical studies incorporating public input to evaluate and strengthen these processes.
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  • Understanding variations in secondary findings reporting practices across U.S. genome sequencing laboratories.Sara L. Ackerman & Barbara A. Koenig - 2018 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 9 (1):48-57.
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