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  1. Rights.Leif Wenar - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Rights dominate most modern understandings of what actions are proper and which institutions are just. Rights structure the forms of our governments, the contents of our laws, and the shape of morality as we perceive it. To accept a set of rights is to approve a distribution of freedom and authority, and so to endorse a certain view of what may, must, and must not be done.
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  • Fundamental Legal Concepts: The Hohfeldian Framework.Luís Duarte D'Almeida - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (10):554-569.
    Wesley Newcomb Hohfeld's account of legal rights is now 100 years old. It has been much discussed, and remains very influential with philosophers and lawyers alike. Yet it is still sometimes misunderstood in crucial respects. This article offers a rigorous exposition of Hohfeld's framework; discusses its claims to comprehensiveness and fundamentality, reviewing recent work on the topic; and highlights the argumentative uses of Hohfeld's most important distinction.
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  • Democratic Legitimacy, Political Speech and Viewpoint Neutrality.Kristian Skagen Ekeli - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 47 (6):723-752.
    The purpose of this article is to consider the question of whether democratic legitimacy requires viewpoint neutrality with regard to political speech – including extremist political speech, such a...
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  • The Strange Endeavour to Establish a Right to Do Wrong.Izhak Englard - 2016 - Rechtstheorie 47 (1):13-23.
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