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  1. A Wheelchair Control System Using Human-Machine Interaction: Single-Modal and Multimodal Approaches.Mohamed K. Shahin, Alaa Tharwat, Tarek Gaber & Aboul Ella Hassanien - 2019 - Journal of Intelligent Systems 28 (1):115-132.
    Recent research studies showed that brain-controlled systems/devices are breakthrough technology. Such devices can provide disabled people with the power to control the movement of the wheelchair using different signals. With this technology, disabled people can remotely steer a wheelchair, a computer, or a tablet. This paper introduces a simple, low-cost human-machine interface system to help chaired people to control their wheelchair using several control sources. To achieve this paper’s aim, a laptop was installed on a wheelchair in front of the (...)
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  • Facial Mimicry in its Social Setting.Beate Seibt, Andreas Mühlberger, Katja U. Likowski & Peter Weyers - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  • Neural Correlates of Facial Mimicry: Simultaneous Measurements of EMG and BOLD Responses During Perception of Dynamic Compared to Static Facial Expressions.Krystyna Rymarczyk, Łukasz Żurawski, Kamila Jankowiak-Siuda & Iwona Szatkowska - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • The Social Calibration of Emotion Expression.Christian von Scheve - 2012 - Sociological Theory 30 (1):1-14.
    This article analyzes the role of emotions in social interaction and their effects on social structuration and the emergence of micro-social order. It argues that facial expressions of emotion are key in generating robust patterns of social interaction. First, the article shows that actors’ encoding of facial expressions combines hardwired physiological principles on the one hand and socially learned aspects on the other hand, leading to fine-grained and socially differentiated dialects of expression. Second, it is argued that decoding facial expression (...)
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  • Facial Expression of Pain: An Evolutionary Account.Amanda C. De C. Williams - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):439-455.
    This paper proposes that human expression of pain in the presence or absence of caregivers, and the detection of pain by observers, arises from evolved propensities. The function of pain is to demand attention and prioritise escape, recovery, and healing; where others can help achieve these goals, effective communication of pain is required. Evidence is reviewed of a distinct and specific facial expression of pain from infancy to old age, consistent across stimuli, and recognizable as pain by observers. Voluntary control (...)
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  • Do Intuitive and Deliberate Judgments Rely on Two Distinct Neural Systems? A Case Study in Face Processing.Laura F. Mega, Gerd Gigerenzer & Kirsten G. Volz - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • Beyond Smiles: The Impact of Culture and Race in Embodying and Decoding Facial Expressions.Roberto Caldara - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):438-439.
    Understanding the very nature of the smile with an integrative approach and a novel model is a fertile ground for a new theoretical vision and insights. However, from this perspective, I challenge the authors to integrate culture and race in their model, because both factors would impact upon the embodying and decoding of facial expressions.
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  • The Proximate Mechanisms and Ultimate Functions of Smiles.Marc Mehu & Karim N'Diaye - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):454-455.
    Niedenthal et al's classification of smiles erroneously conflates psychological mechanisms and adaptive functions. This confusion weakens the rationale behind the types of smiles they chose to individuate, and it obfuscates the distinction between the communicative versus denotative nature of smiles and the role of perceived-gaze direction in emotion recognition.
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  • The Future of SIMS: Who Embodies Which Smile and When?Paula M. Niedenthal, Martial Mermillod, Marcus Maringer & Ursula Hess - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):464-480.
    The set of 30 stimulating commentaries on our target article helps to define the areas of our initial position that should be reiterated or else made clearer and, more importantly, the ways in which moderators of and extensions to the SIMS can be imagined. In our response, we divide the areas of discussion into (1) a clarification of our meaning of (2) a consideration of our proposed categories of smiles, (3) a reminder about the role of top-down processes in the (...)
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  • The Social Calibration of Emotion Expression: An Affective Basic of Micro-Social Order.Christian von Scheve - 2012 - Sociological Theory 30 (1):1 - 14.
    This article analyzes the role of emotions in social interaction and their effects on social structuration and the emergence of micro-social order. It argues that facial expressions of emotion are key in generating robust patterns of social interaction. First, the article shows that actors' encoding of facial expressions combines hardwired physiological principles on the one hand and socially learned aspects on the other hand, leading to fine-grained and socially differentiated dialects of expression. Second, it is argued that decoding facial expression (...)
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  • Looking with Different Eyes: The Psychological Meaning of Categorisation Goals Moderates Facial Reactivity to Facial Expressions.Lotte F. van Dillen, Lasana T. Harris, Wilco W. van Dijk & Mark Rotteveel - 2015 - Cognition and Emotion 29 (8):1382-1400.
  • Worry Spreads: Interpersonal Transfer of Problem-Related Anxiety.Brian Parkinson & Gwenda Simons - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (3):462-479.
  • An Electromyographic Investigation of the Impact of Task Relevance on Facial Mimicry.Peter R. Cannon, Amy E. Hayes & Steven P. Tipper - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (5):918-929.