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  1. Boundary Work in Ecological Restoration.Jozef Keulartz - 2009 - Environmental Philosophy 6 (1):35-55.
    Two protracted debates about the moral status of animals in ecological restoration projects are discussed that both testify to the troubling aspects of our inclination to think in terms of dualisms and dichotomies. These cases are more or less complementary: the first one is about the (re)introduction of species that were once pushed out of their native environment; the other one concerns the elimination or eradication of “exotic” and “alien” species that have invaded and degraded ecosystems. Both cases show the (...)
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  • Nativism and Nature: Rethinking Biological Invasion.J. H. Peretti - 1998 - Environmental Values 7 (2):183-192.
    The study of biological invasions raises troubling scientific, political and moral issues that merit discussion and debate on a broad scale. Nativist trends in Conservation Biology have made environmentalists biased against alien species. This bias is scientifically questionable, and may have roots in xenophobic and racist attitudes. Rethinking conservationists' conceptions of biological invasion is essential to the development of a progressive environmental science, politics, and philosophy.
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  • Strangers in a Strange Land: The Problem of Exotic Species.M. Woods & P. V. Moriarty - 2001 - Environmental Values 10 (2):163-191.
    Environmentalists consider invasions by exotic species of plants and animals to be one of the most serious environmental problems we face today, as well as one of the leading causes of biodiversity loss. We argue that in order to develop and enact sensible policies, it is crucial to consider two philosophical questions: What exactly makes a species native or exotic, and What values are at stake? We focus on the first of these two questions, and offer some preliminary suggestions with (...)
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  • Critique of Callicott's Biosocial Moral Theory.John Hadley - 2007 - Ethics and the Environment 12 (1):67-78.
    : J. Baird Callicott's claim to have unified environmentalism and animal liberation should be rejected by holists and liberationists. By making relations of intimacy necessary for moral considerability, Callicott excludes from the moral community nonhuman animals unable to engage in intimate relations due to the circumstances of their confinement. By failing to afford moral protection to animals in factory farms and research laboratories, Callicott's biosocial moral theory falls short of meeting a basic moral demand of liberationists. Moreover, were Callicott to (...)
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  • Exotic Invasions, Nativism, and Ecological Restoration: On the Persistence of a Contentious Debate.William O’Brien - 2006 - Ethics, Place and Environment 9 (1):63 – 77.
    Proponents of ecological restoration view the practice as a means of both repairing damage done to ecosystems by humans and creating an avenue to re-establish respectful and cooperative human-environment relationships. One debate affecting ecological restoration focuses on the place of 'exotic' species in restored ecosystems. Though popular, campaigns against exotics have been criticized for their troubling rhetorical parallels with nativism aimed at human immigrants. I point to some of the reasons why this critique of nativism persists, despite protests that no (...)
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  • Adaptive Management of Nonnative Species: Moving Beyond the “Either-Or” Through Experimental Pluralism.Jason M. Evans, Ann C. Wilkie & Jeffrey Burkhardt - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (6):521-539.
    This paper develops the outlines of a pragmatic, adaptive management-based approach toward the control of invasive nonnative species (INS) through a case study of Kings Bay/Crystal River, a large artesian springs ecosystem that is one of Florida’s most important habitats for endangered West Indian manatees ( Trichechus manatus ). Building upon recent critiques of invasion biology, principles of adaptive management, and our own interview and participant–observer research, we argue that this case study represents an example in which rigid application of (...)
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  • Pour une autre représentation métaphorique des invasions biologiques.Jacques Tassin & Christian A. Kull - 2012 - Natures Sciences Sociétés 20 (4):404-414.
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  • Invasive Species and the Loss of Beta Diversity. Wright - 2011 - Ethics and the Environment 16 (1):75-98.
    As I travel the highways of Georgia, I am regularly appalled by the ubiquitous presence of kudzu. It covers trees, telephone poles, open swathes of land, and old houses, making many locations indistinguishable from one another; all I can see from the road is a wave of green covering any formerly distinctive markings. Thinking back to the intentional introduction of kudzu to the American southeast, I recognize that those individuals who encouraged the planting of kudzu made a serious mistake.1 Their (...)
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