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  1. From Hayek to Keynes: G.L.S. Shackle and Ignorance of the Future.Greg Hill - 2004 - Critical Review 16 (1):53-79.
    G.L.S. Shackle stood at the historic crossroads where the economics of Hayek and Keynes met. Shackle fused these opposing lines of thought in a macroeconomic theory that draws Keynesian conclusions from Austrian premises. In Shackle 's scheme of thought, the power to imagine alternative courses of action releases decision makers from the web of predictable causation. But the spontaneous and unpredictable choices that originate in the subjective and disparate orientations of individual agents deny us the possibility of rational expectations, and (...)
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  • An Ultra‐Keynesian Strikes Back: Rejoinder to Horwitz.Greg Hill - 1998 - Critical Review 12 (1-2):113-126.
    Abstract In real?world markets, individual intentions cannot be brought into perfect harmony before decisions are taken. Choices made without this pre?ordering?choices made in ignorance of one another?produce unwanted outcomes. It is this absence of coordination among plans, not centralized banking, that is the primary cause of macroeconomic market failure. Steven Hor?witz's free?banking alternative would aggravate the collective?action problems inherent in economies without complete markets.
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