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  1. The Link Between (Not) Practicing CSR and Corporate Reputation: Psychological Foundations and Managerial Implications.Nick Lin-Hi & Igor Blumberg - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (1):185-198.
    It is often assumed that corporate social responsibility is a very promising way for corporations to improve their reputations, and a positive link between practicing CSR and corporate reputation is supported by empirical evidence. However, little is known about the mechanisms that underlie this relationship. In addition, the effects of not practicing CSR on corporate reputation have received little attention thus far. This paper contributes to the literature by analyzing the cause-and-effect relationships between practicing CSR and corporate reputation. To this (...)
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  • Social Responsibility and the Olympic Games: The Mediating Role of Consumer Attributions. [REVIEW]Matthew Walker, Bob Heere, Milena M. Parent & Dan Drane - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):659 - 680.
    Current literature suggests that corporate social responsibility (CSR) can affect consumers' attitudes towards an organization and is regarded as a driver for reputation-building and fostering sustained consumer patronage. Although prior research has addressed the direct influence of CSR on consumer responses, this research examined the mediating influence of consumer's perceived organizational motives within an NGO setting.Given the heightened public attention surrounding the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, data were collected from consumers of the Games to assess their perceptions of the International (...)
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  • Reputation, Responsibility, and Stakeholder Support in Scandinavian Firms: A Comparative Analysis.Deborah Vidaver-Cohen & Peggy Simcic Brønn - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (1):49-64.
    This paper describes an exploratory study of corporate responsibility, corporate reputation, and stakeholder support in Norway, Sweden and Denmark—countries recognized worldwide as providing an institutional climate uniquely conducive to responsible business practice. Conducting a secondary analysis of Scandinavian data from Reputation Institute’s extensive global research on corporate reputation and responsibility, we examine four key questions: First, do Scandinavians agree with external observers that firms in their countries demonstrate superior levels of corporate responsibility? Second, relative to other reputation drivers, to what (...)
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  • Exploring the Impact of Legal Systems and Financial Structure on Corporate Responsibility.Céline Gainet - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (S2):195 - 222.
    This study investigates how diverse European legal systems and financial structures influence corporate social and environmental responsibility. The argument is developed by means of a framework that integrates legal systems and financial structures. Hypotheses relating to environmental responsibility have been tested using Innovest data gathered between 2002 and 2007 from 645 companies in 16 countries; and hypotheses relating to social responsibility have been tested using Innovest data gathered between 2004 and 2007 from 600 companies. The findings demonstrate that legal systems (...)
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  • Seeking Legitimacy Through CSR: Institutional Pressures and Corporate Responses of Multinationals in Sri Lanka.Eshani Beddewela & Jenny Fairbrass - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (3):503-522.
    Arguably, the corporate social responsibility practices of multinational enterprises are influenced by a wide range of both internal and external factors. Perhaps, most critical among the exogenous forces operating on MNEs are those exerted by state and other key institutional actors in host countries. Crucially, academic research conducted to date offers little data about how MNEs use their CSR activities to strategically manage their relationship with those actors in order to gain legitimisation advantages in host countries. This paper addresses that (...)
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