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  1. Grandparental Investment: Past, Present, and Future.David A. Coall & Ralph Hertwig - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (1):1-19.
    What motivates grandparents to their altruism? We review answers from evolutionary theory, sociology, and economics. Sometimes in direct conflict with each other, these accounts of grandparental investment exist side-by-side, with little or no theoretical integration. They all account for some of the data, and none account for all of it. We call for a more comprehensive theoretical framework of grandparental investment that addresses its proximate and ultimate causes, and its variability due to lineage, values, norms, institutions (e.g., inheritance laws), and (...)
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  • The Generation Game is the Cooperation Game: The Role of Grandparents in the Timing of Reproduction.Rebecca Sear & Thomas E. Dickins - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (1):34-35.
    Coall & Hertwig (C&H) demonstrate the importance of grandparents to children, even in low fertility societies. We suggest policy-makers interested in reproductive timing in such contexts should be alerted to the practical applications of this cooperative breeding framework. The presence or absence of a supportive kin network could help explain why some women begin their reproductive careers or.
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  • Romantic Jealousy in Early Adulthood and in Later Life.Todd K. Shackelford, Martin Voracek, David P. Schmitt, David M. Buss, Viviana A. Weekes-Shackelford & Richard L. Michalski - 2004 - Human Nature 15 (3):283-300.
    Young men are more distressed by a partner’s sexual infidelity, whereas young women are more distressed by a partner’s emotional infidelity. The present research investigated (a) whether the sex difference in jealousy replicates in an older sample, and (b) whether younger people differ from older people in their selection of the more distressing infidelity scenario. We presented forced-choice dilemmas to 202 older people (mean age = 67 years) and to 234 younger people (mean age = 20 years). The sex difference (...)
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  • Grandparental Investment Facilitates Harmonization of Work and Family in Employed Parents: A Lifespan Psychological Perspective.Christiane A. Hoppmann & Petra L. Klumb - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (1):27-28.
    The target article emphasizes the need to identify psychological mechanisms underlying grandparental investment, particularly in low-risk family contexts. We extend this approach by addressing the changing demands of balancing work and family in low-risk families. Taking a lifespan psychological perspective, we identify additional motivators and potential benefits of grandparental investment for grandparents themselves and for subsequent generations.
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  • Toward an Integrative Framework of Grandparental Investment.David A. Coall & Ralph Hertwig - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (1):40-59.
    This response outlines more reasons why we need the integrative framework of grandparental investments and intergenerational transfers that we advocated in the target article. We discusses obstacles that stand in the way of such a framework and of a better understanding of the effects of grandparenting in the developed world. We highlight new research directions that have emerged from the commentaries, and we end by discussing some of the things in our target article about which we may have been wrong.
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  • Of Human Bonding: Cooperation or Exploitation.Laura Betzig - 1992 - Social Science Information 31 (4):611-642.
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  • Demographic Constraints on Population Growth of Early Humans.E. A. Hammel - 1996 - Human Nature 7 (3):217-255.
    The human population grew at very low average rates for most of its existence. Mortality was reasonably severe and expectation of life at birth was low. The level of fertility necessary to achieve even inifinitesimal population growth under such mortality implies birth intervals sufficiently short to conflict with the ability to care for and carry children in a mobile foraging economy. Techniques for the control of mortality, especially of children before puberty and of women in childbirth, and of child care (...)
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  • Do Grandmothers Who Play Favorites Sow Seeds of Genomic Conflict?Jason A. Wilder - 2010 - Bioessays 32 (6):457-460.
  • Evolution of the Human Menopause.Daryl P. Shanley & Thomas B. L. Kirkwood - 2001 - Bioessays 23 (3):282-287.
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  • The Patriarch Hypothesis.Frank Marlowe - 2000 - Human Nature 11 (1):27-42.
    Menopause is puzzling because life-history theory predicts there should be no selection for outliving one’s reproductive capacity. Adaptive explanations of menopause offered thus far turn on women’s long-term investment in offspring and grandoffspring, all variations on the grandmother hypothesis. Here, I offer a very different explanation. The patriarch hypothesis proposes that once males became capable of maintaining high status and reproductive access beyond their peak physical condition, selection favored the extension of maximum life span in males. Because the relevant genes (...)
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  • Packer and Colleagues' Model of Menopause for Humans.Kim Hill & A. Magdalena Hurtado - 1999 - Human Nature 10 (2):199-204.
  • Trade-Offs Between Female Food Acquisition and Child Care Among Hiwi and Ache Foragers.A. Magdalena Hurtado, Kim Hill, Ines Hurtado & Hillard Kaplan - 1992 - Human Nature 3 (3):185-216.
    Even though female food acquisition is an area of considerable interest in hunter-gatherer research, the ecological determinants of women’s economic decisions in these populations are still poorly understood. The literature on female foraging behavior indicates that there is considerable variation within and across foraging societies in the amount of time that women spend foraging and in the amount and types of food that they acquire. It is possible that this heterogeneity reflects variation in the trade-offs between time spent in food (...)
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