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  1. The Utility of Multiple Utility: A Comment on Brennan: Mark A. Lutz.Mark A. Lutz - 1993 - Economics and Philosophy 9 (1):145-154.
  • The Scope of the Rational Choice Perspective in Sociological Research.Olof Dahlbäck - 1995 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 25 (3):237–261.
  • Constitutional Political Economy: The Political Philosophy of Homo Economicus?Geoffrey Brennan & Alan Hamlin - 1995 - Journal of Political Philosophy 3 (3):280–303.
  • Norms and Rationality. Is Moral Behavior a Form of Rational Action?Karl-Dieter Opp - 2013 - Theory and Decision 74 (3):383-409.
    This article addresses major arguments in the controversy about the “rationality” of moral behavior: can moral behavior be explained by rational choice theory? The two positions discussed are the incentives thesis and the autonomy thesis claiming that moral behavior has nothing to do with utility. The article analyses arguments for the autonomy thesis by J. Elster, A. Etzioni, and J. G. March and J. P. Olsen. Finally, the general claim is discussed whether norm following and norm emergence are utility maximizing. (...)
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  • Toward Deontological Social Sciences.Amitai Etzioni - 1989 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 19 (2):145-156.
  • Business Ethics as Applied Ethics: A Discourse Ethics Approach.Domingo Garcia-Marzá - 2012 - Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 3 (3):99.
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  • What is Christianity Good For? Religion as Assurance of Ethical and Economic Action.Peter Koslowski - 2007 - Philosophia Reformata 72 (1):34-52.
    There is a gap between self-interest and morality that is caused not only by individual shortcomings but also by the interdependence of the outcome of individual action with the actions of others. If the others can be expected to be ethical this uncertainty about the others’ behaviour is reduced but not eliminated. Failure of economic motivation will be followed by failure of ethical motivation. Christianity or monotheistic religion in general comes into the picture to assure ethical behaviour of being advantageous (...)
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  • An Economic Rationale for a Work and Savings Ethic? J. Buchanan’s Late Works and Business Ethics.Christoph Luetge - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 66 (1):43-51.
    This article discusses the possibility of an economic foundation for a work and savings ethic. In particular, James M. Buchanan has, in his late works, endorsed traditional 'Puritan' demands for working and saving more, while arguing that this is beneficial for all members of a society. I will question Buchanan's analysis of the 'Puritan' ethic both in normative and methodological respects before aiming at a constructive interpretation.
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  • The Early Modern Origins of Behavioral Economics.Richard Boyd - 2020 - Social Philosophy and Policy 37 (1):30-54.
    For all the recent discoveries of behavioral psychology and experimental economics, the spirit of homo economicus still dominates the contemporary disciplines of economics, political science, and sociology. Turning back to the earliest chapters of political economy, however, reveals that pioneering figures such as Francis Bacon, Thomas Hobbes, and Adam Smith were hardly apostles of economic rationality as they are often portrayed in influential narratives of the development of the social sciences. As we will see, while all three of these thinkers (...)
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  • Where Did Economics Go Wrong? Modern Economics as a Flight From Reality.Peter J. Boettke - 1997 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 11 (1):11-64.
    Abstract F. A. Hayek's realistic economic theory has been replaced by the formalistic use of equlibrium models that bear little resemblance to reality. These models are as serviceable to the right as to the left: they allow the economist either to condemn capitalism for failing to measure up to the model of perfect competition, or to praise capitalism as a utopia of perfect knowledge and rational expectations. Hayek, by contrast, used equilibrium to show that while capitalism is not perfect, it (...)
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  • “Greed is Good” ... Or is It? Economic Ideology and Moral Tension in a Graduate School of Business.Janet S. Walker - 1992 - Journal of Business Ethics 11 (4):273 - 283.
    This article reports the results of an exploratory investigation of a particular area of moral tension experienced by MBA students in a graduate school of business. During the first phase of the study, MBA students'' own perceptions about the moral climate and culture of the business school were examined. The data gathered in this first part of the study indicate that the students recognize that a central part of this culture is constituted by a shared familiarity with a set of (...)
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  • A Model of Collaborative Entrepreneurship for a More Humanistic Management.Hector Rocha & Raymond Miles - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S3):445-462.
    Inter-organizational models are both a well-documented phenomena and a well-established domain in management and business ethics. Those models rest on collaborative capabilities. However, mainstream theories and practices aimed at developing these capabilities are based on a narrow set of assumptions and ethical principles about human nature and relationships, which constrain the very development of capabilities sought by them. This article presents an Aristotelic–Thomistic approach to collaborative entrepreneurship within and across communities of firms operating in complementary markets. Adopting a scholarship of (...)
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  • When Jack and Jill Make a Deal*: DANIEL M. HAUSMAN.Daniel M. Hausman - 1992 - Social Philosophy and Policy 9 (1):95-113.
    In ordinary circumstances, human actions have a myriad of unintended and often unforeseen consequences for the lives of other people. Problems of pollution are serious examples, but spillovers and side effects are the rule, not the exception. Who knows what consequences this essay may have? This essay is concerned with the problems of justice created by spillovers. After characterizing such spillovers more precisely and relating the concept to the economist's notion of an externality, I shall then consider the moral conclusions (...)
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  • Beyond Self-Interest and Altruism: A Reconstruction of Adam Smith's Theory of Human Conduct: Elias L. Khalil.Elias L. Khalil - 1990 - Economics and Philosophy 6 (2):255-273.
    I attempt a reconstruction of Adam Smith's view of human nature as explicated in The Theory of Moral Sentiments. Smith's view of human conduct is neither functionalist nor reductionist, but interactionist. The moral autonomy of the individual, conscience, is neither made a function of public approval nor reduced to self-contained impulses of altruism and egoism. Smith does not see human conduct as a blend of independently defined impulses. Rather, conduct is unified, by the underpinning sentiment of sympathy.
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  • Are We One Self or Multiple Selves?: Implications for Law and Public Policy: Richard A. Posner.Richard A. Posner - 1997 - Legal Theory 3 (1):23-35.
    Some people hate themselves. But if I say, “I hate myself,” who is this “I” that stands apart from “myself”? And notice how in the expression “I am not myself today,” the “I” and “myself” change places. Now it is “myself” who is the authentic, the authoritative, the judgmental “I,” and it is “I” who is the self that is judged and found wanting. Some people talk to themselves; when they do, who is speaking and who is listening?
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  • The Case for a Multiple-Utility Conception.Amitai Etzioni - 1986 - Economics and Philosophy 2 (2):159.
    In recent decades, neoclassical economists have made heroic efforts to accommodate within the confines of the concept of rational utility maximization the fact that individual behavior is significantly affected by moral considerations. This article argues the merits of using an alternative approach: recognizing that individuals pursue at least two irreducible sources of value or “utility”, pleasure and morality. The possibility that some additional utilities may have to be recognized is explored. This raises the concern that conceptual anarchy will break out, (...)
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  • ‘Practical Comparability’ and Ends in Economics.Ricardo F. Crespo - 2007 - Journal of Economic Methodology 14 (3):371-393.
    This paper endeavours to summarize a variety of arguments for a reconsideration of ends in Economics. The logical structure of the rationality of ends (practical rationality) differs from the one of means (instrumental rationality). The paper sets out to explain the differences between both rationalities and some of the implications of incorporating this new emphasis on ends, given that Economics adopts the means rationality. The emergence of the topics of incommensurability and incomparability of ends is presented and a possible way (...)
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  • Efficiency, Nature and the Division of Labor (a Review Article of James Bernard Murphy's The Moral Economy of Labor: Aristotelian Themes in Economic Theory). [REVIEW]Elias L. Khalil - 1996 - Journal of Economic Methodology 3 (2):334-342.
    James Murphy has written an important and very engaging book. It has a central thesis. The allocation of divided tasks among different workers may not enhance efficiency because it separates conception of the task from its execution. The separation enhances work drudgery, suppresses self-realization, and retards the development of human character. Workers in the industrial age are transformed into tools, which lowers morale and stifles creativeness. Why do firms practice such detailed division of laborers? For Murphy, the practice is mainly (...)
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