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  1. The Proposal of Philosophical Basis of the Health Care System.Andrzej Bielecki & Sylwia Nieszporska - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (1):23-35.
    The studies of health care systems are conducted intensively on various levels. They are important because the systems suffer from numerous pathologies. The health care is analyzed, first of all, in economic aspects but their functionality in the framework of systems theory is studied, as well. There are also attempts to work out some general values on which health care systems should be based. Nevertheless, the aforementioned studies, however, are fragmentary ones. In this paper holistic approach to the philosophical basis (...)
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  • International Experiences with Priority Setting in Healthcare.Bert Gordijn & Henk ten Have - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):325-326.
  • Medium-Range Narratives as a Complementary Tool to Principle-Based Prioritization in Sweden: Test Case “ADHD”.Pier Jaarsma & Petra Gelhaus - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (1):113-125.
    In this paper, for the benefit of reflection processes in clinical and in local, regional, and national priority-setting, we aim to develop an ethical theoretical framework that includes both ethical principles and medium-range narratives. We present our suggestion in the particular case of having to choose between treatment interventions for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and treatment interventions for other conditions or diseases, under circumstances of scarcity. In order to arrive at our model, we compare two distinct ethical approaches: a generalist (...)
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  • For the Sake of Justice: Should We Prioritize Rare Diseases?Niklas Juth - 2017 - Health Care Analysis 25 (1):1-20.
    This article is about the justifiability of accepting worse cost effectiveness for orphan drugs, that is, treatments for rare diseases, in a publicly financed health care system. Recently, three arguments have been presented that may be used in favour of exceptionally advantageous economic terms for orphan drugs. These arguments share the common feature of all referring to considerations of justice or fairness: the argument of the irrelevance of group size, the argument from the principle of need, and the argument of (...)
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  • Values and Value Conflicts in Implementation and Use of Preconception Expanded Carrier Screening - an Expert Interview Study.Amal Matar, Mats G. Hansson & Anna T. Höglund - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):25.
    Endeavors have been made to found and incorporate ethical values in most aspects of healthcare, including health technology assessment. Health technologies and their assessment are value-laden and could trigger problems with dissemination if they contradict societal norms. Per WHO definition, preconception expanded carrier screening is a new health technology that warrants assessment. It is a genetic test offered to couples who have no known risk of recessive genetic diseases and are interested pregnancy. A test may screen for carrier status of (...)
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  • Crisis Management and Public Health: Ethical Principles for Priority Setting at a Regional Level in Sweden.Anders Nordgren - 2015 - Public Health Ethics 8 (1):72-84.
    In this article I analyse and discuss guidelines for priority setting in crisis management at a regional level in Sweden. The guidelines concern three types of crises: pandemics, large losses of electric power and interruptions in water supply. Pandemics are typical public health issues. Large losses of electric power and interruptions in water supply are in themselves not, but may have serious public health consequences. These guidelines are compared with guidelines for priority setting in health care. This is done because (...)
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  • Remote Monitoring or Close Encounters? Ethical Considerations in Priority Setting Regarding Telecare.Anders Nordgren - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 22 (4):325-339.
    The proportion of elderly in society is growing rapidly, leading to increasing health care costs. New remote monitoring technologies are expected to lower these costs by reducing the number of close encounters with health care professionals, for example the number of visits to health care centres. In this paper, I discuss issues of priority setting raised by this expectation. As a starting-point, I analyse the recent debate on principles for priority setting in Sweden. The Swedish debate illustrates that developing an (...)
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  • Resource Allocation and Rationing in Nursing Care: A Discussion Paper.P. Anne Scott, Clare Harvey, Heike Felzmann, Riitta Suhonen, Monika Habermann, Kristin Halvorsen, Karin Christiansen, Luisa Toffoli & Evridiki Papastavrou - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (5):1528-1539.
    Driven by interests in workforce planning and patient safety, a growing body of literature has begun to identify the reality and the prevalence of missed nursing care, also specified as care left undone, rationed care or unfinished care. Empirical studies and conceptual considerations have focused on structural issues such as staffing, as well as on outcome issues – missed care/unfinished care. Philosophical and ethical aspects of unfinished care are largely unexplored. Thus, while internationally studies highlight instances of covert rationing/missed care/care (...)
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  • Principles of Need and the Aggregation Thesis.Erik Gustavsson & Niklas Juth - 2019 - Health Care Analysis 27 (2):77-92.
    Principles of need are constantly referred to in health care priority setting. The common denominator for any principle of need is that it will ascribe some kind of special normative weight to people being worse off. However, this common ground does not answer the question how a plausible principle of need should relate to the aggregation of benefits across individuals. Principles of need are sometimes stated as being incompatible with aggregation and sometimes characterized as accepting aggregation in much the same (...)
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