Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Deciding Together? Best Interests and Shared Decision-Making in Paediatric Intensive Care.Giles Birchley - 2014 - Health Care Analysis 22 (3):203-222.
    In the western healthcare, shared decision making has become the orthodox approach to making healthcare choices as a way of promoting patient autonomy. Despite the fact that the autonomy paradigm is poorly suited to paediatric decision making, such an approach is enshrined in English common law. When reaching moral decisions, for instance when it is unclear whether treatment or non-treatment will serve a child’s best interests, shared decision making is particularly questionable because agreement does not ensure moral validity. With reference (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Perspectives on Assisted Dying.David Badcott & Fuat S. Oduncu - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):351-353.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • In Defence of Moral Pluralism and Compromise in Health Care Networks.Kasper Raus, Eric Mortier & Kristof Eeckloo - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (4):362-379.
    The organisation of health care is rapidly changing. There is a trend to move away from individual health care institutions towards transmural integrated care and interorganizational collaboration in networks. However, within such collaboration and network there is often likely to be a pluralism of values as different health care institutions often have very different values. For this paper, we examine three different models of how we believe institutions can come to collaborate in networks, and thus reap the potential benefits of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Compromising on Assisted Suicide: Is 'Turning a Blind Eye' Ethical?A. Mullock - 2012 - Clinical Ethics 7 (1):17-23.
    Following the decision of the House of Lords in Purdy, the Director of Public Prosecutions was required to promulgate guidance as to how prosecutorial discretion is exercised over the decision of whether to prosecute or not under the Suicide Act 1961. The resulting policy essentially confirms that if a lay person, who is motivated wholly by compassion, provides minor and reluctant assistance to a mentally competent adult, he or she is extremely unlikely to be prosecuted. Consequently, prosecutorial policy over cases (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Debate About Physician Assistance in Dying: 40 Years of Unrivalled Progress in Medical Ethics?S. Holm - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (1):40-43.