Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Consciousness, Accessibility, and the Mesh Between Psychology and Neuroscience.Ned Block - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5):481--548.
    How can we disentangle the neural basis of phenomenal consciousness from the neural machinery of the cognitive access that underlies reports of phenomenal consciousness? We can see the problem in stark form if we ask how we could tell whether representations inside a Fodorian module are phenomenally conscious. The methodology would seem straightforward: find the neural natural kinds that are the basis of phenomenal consciousness in clear cases when subjects are completely confident and we have no reason to doubt their (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   257 citations  
  • Overflow, Access, and Attention.Ned Block - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5-6):530-548.
    In this response to 32 commentators, I start by clarifying the overflow argument. I explain why the distinction between generic and specific phenomenology is important and why we are justified in acknowledging specific phenomenology in the overflow experiments. Other issues discussed are the relations among report, cognitive access, and attention; panpsychic disaster; the mesh between psychology and neuroscience; and whether consciousness exists.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  • How Rich is Consciousness? The Partial Awareness Hypothesis.Sid Kouider, Vincent de Gardelle, Jérôme Sackur & Emmanuel Dupoux - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (7):301-307.
  • The Identity‐Location Binding Problem.Piers D. L. Howe & Adam Ferguson - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (7):1622-1645.
    The binding problem is fundamental to visual perception. It is the problem of associating an object's visual properties with itself and not with some other object. The problem is made particular difficult because different properties of an object, such as its color, shape, size, and motion, are often processed independently, sometimes in different cortical areas. The results of these separate analyses have to be combined before the object can be seen as a single coherent entity as opposed to a collection (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • How Chromatic Phenomenality Largely Overflow its Cognitive Accessibility.John Beeckmans - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):917-928.
    It has been suggested that the core neural bases for visual phenomenal consciousness and for access consciousness are located in anatomically separate regions. If this is correct, and if, as Block suggests, the core neural substrate of visual phenomenality is located early in the visual cortex where detailed chromatic information is available, then it would be reasonable to infer that our intuitions of chromatically rich visual phenomenality are plausible. It is furthermore suggested that during perception cognitive access to this chromatic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Visual Features for Perception, Attention, and Working Memory: Toward a Three-Factor Framework.Liqiang Huang - 2015 - Cognition 145:43-52.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Processing Spatial Relations With Different Apertures of Attention.Bruno Laeng, Matia Okubo, Ayako Saneyoshi & Chikashi Michimata - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (2):297-329.
    Neuropsychological studies suggest the existence of lateralized networks that represent categorical and coordinate types of spatial information. In addition, studies with neural networks have shown that they encode more effectively categorical spatial judgments or coordinate spatial judgments, if their input is based, respectively, on units with relatively small, nonoverlapping receptive fields, as opposed to units with relatively large, overlapping receptive fields. These findings leave open the question of whether interactive processes between spatial detectors and types of spatial relations can be (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations