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  1. Informed Consent and Biobanks.Ellen Wright Clayton - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (1):15-21.
    Biomedical research has always relied on access to human biological materials and clinical information, resources that when combined form biobanks. In the past, it appears that investigators sometimes used these resources with relatively little oversight, and without the consent of the individuals from whom these materials and information were obtained. Several developments in the last ten to fifteen years have converged to place greater emphasis on the role of individual consent in the creation and use of biobanks. The most important (...)
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  • Informed Consent and Biobanks.Ellen Wright Clayton - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (1):15-21.
    Biomedical research has always relied on access to human biological materials and clinical information, resources that when combined form biobanks. In the past, it appears that investigators sometimes used these resources with relatively little oversight, and without the consent of the individuals from whom these materials and information were obtained. Several developments in the last ten to fifteen years have converged to place greater emphasis on the role of individual consent in the creation and use of biobanks. The most important (...)
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  • The “Right Not to Know” in the Genomic Era: Time to Break From Tradition?Benjamin E. Berkman & Sara Chandros Hull - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (3):28-31.
  • Quality Improvement Ethics: Lessons From the SUPPORT Study.Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (12):14-19.
    The Office of Human Research Protections was not justified in issuing findings against the SUPPORT Institutions. Our community can learn from the evolving healthcare transformation into learning health systems by thinking about the novel ethical issues about standard of care research raised by the SUPPORT with the same spirit of quality improvement. The current regulatory framework and the concept of foreseeable research risks is insufficient to advance the debate about the ethics of randomization of standard clinical interventions. This article uses (...)
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  • Disclosing Individual Genetic Results to Research Participants.Vardit Ravitsky & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (6):8 – 17.
    Investigators and institutional review boards should integrate plans about the appropriate disclosure of individual genetic results when designing research studies. The ethical principles of beneficence, respect, reciprocity, and justice provide justification for routinely offering certain results to research participants. We propose a result-evaluation approach that assesses the expected information and the context of the study in order to decide whether results should be offered. According to this approach, the analytic validity and the clinical utility of a specific result determine whether (...)
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  • Patients' Views on Identifiability of Samples and Informed Consent for Genetic Research.Sara Chandros Hull, Richard Sharp, Jeffrey Botkin, Mark Brown, Mark Hughes, Jeremy Sugarman, Debra Schwinn, Pamela Sankar, Dragana Bolcic-Jankovic, Brian Clarridge & Benjamin Wilfond - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (10):62-70.
    It is unclear whether the regulatory distinction between non-identifiable and identifiable information—information used to determine informed consent practices for the use of clinically derived samples for genetic research—is meaningful to patients. The objective of this study was to examine patients' attitudes and preferences regarding use of anonymous and identifiable clinical samples for genetic research. Telephone interviews were conducted with 1,193 patients recruited from general medicine, thoracic surgery, or medical oncology clinics at five United States academic medical centers. Wanting to know (...)
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