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  1. Color Realism and Color Science.Alex Byrne & David R. Hilbert - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):3-21.
    The target article is an attempt to make some progress on the problem of color realism. Are objects colored? And what is the nature of the color properties? We defend the view that physical objects (for instance, tomatoes, radishes, and rubies) are colored, and that colors are physical properties, specifically types of reflectance. This is probably a minority opinion, at least among color scientists. Textbooks frequently claim that physical objects are not colored, and that the colors are "subjective" or "in (...)
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  • Where Do the Unique Hues Come From?Justin Broackes - 2011 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 2 (4):601-628.
    Where are we to look for the unique hues? Out in the world? In the eye? In more central processing? 1. There are difficulties looking for the structure of the unique hues in simple combinations of cone-response functions like ( L − M ) and ( S − ( L + M )): such functions may fit pretty well the early physiological processing, but they don’t correspond to the structure of unique hues. It may seem more promising to look to, (...)
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  • The Trajectory of Color.B. A. C. Saunders & J. Van Brakel - 2002 - Perspectives on Science 10 (3):302-355.
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  • On the Structural Properties of the Colours.Jonathan Cohen - 2003 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (1):78-95.
    Primary quality theories of color claim that colors are intrinsic, objective, mind-independent properties of external objects — that colors, like size and shape, are examples of the sort of properties moderns such as Boyle and Locke called primary qualities of body.1 Primary quality theories have long been seen as one of the main philosophical options for understanding the nature of color.
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  • The Constancy of Colored After-Images.Semir Zeki, Samuel Cheadle, Joshua Pepper & Dimitris Mylonas - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
  • The Unique Hues and the Argument From Phenomenal Structure.Wayne Wright - 2019 - Philosophical Studies 176 (6):1513-1533.
    Hardin’s empirically-grounded argument for color eliminativism has defined the color realism debate for the last 30 years. By Hardin’s own estimation, phenomenal structure—the unique/binary hue distinction in particular—poses the greatest problem for color realism. Examination of relevant empirical findings shows that claims about the unique hues which play a central role in the argument from phenomenal structure should be rejected. Chiefly, contrary to widespread belief amongst philosophers and scientists, the unique hues do not play a fundamental role in determining all (...)
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  • What Makes Unique Hues Unique?Valtteri Arstila - 2018 - Synthese 195 (5):1849-1872.
    There exist two widely used notions concerning the structure of phenomenal color space. The first is the notion of unique/binary hue structure, which maintains that there are four unique hues from which all other hues are composed. The second notion is the similarity structure of hues, which describes the interrelations between the hues and hence does not divide hues into two types as the first notion does. Philosophers have considered the existence of the unique/binary hue structure to be empirically and (...)
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  • The Myth of Unique Hues.Radek Ocelák - 2015 - Topoi 34 (2):513-522.
    The paper examines the notion, widespread in the contemporary color science, that there are certain hues, specifically focal red, yellow, green and blue, that are unique or privileged in human prelinguistic color perception, all other chromatic hues being perceptually composed of these. I successively consider and reject all motivations that have been provided for this opinion; namely the linguistic, “phenomenological”, and some minor or historical motivations. I conclude that, contrary to the standard opinion, there is no solid reason to claim (...)
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  • Qualia and the Psychophysiological Explanation of Color Perception.Austen Clark - 1985 - Synthese 65 (3):377-405.
    Can psychology explain the qualitative content of experience? A persistent philosophical objection to that discipline is that it cannot. Qualitative states or 'qualia' are argued to have characteristics which cannot be explained in terms of their relationships to other psychological states, stimuli, and behavior. Since psychology is confined to descriptions of such relationships, it seems that psychology cannot explain qualia. A paradigm case of qualia is provided by simultaneous color contrast effects, in which a neutral grey patch is made to (...)
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  • Gestalt Isomorphism and the Primacy of the Subjective Perceptual Experience.Steven Lehar - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):763-764.
    The Gestalt principle of isomorphism reveals the primacy of subjective experience as a valid source of evidence for the information encoded neurophysiologically. This theory invalidates the abstractionist view that the neurophysiological representation can be of lower dimensionality than the percept to which it gives rise.
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  • “Red-Green” or “Brown-Green” Dichromats? The Accuracy of Dichromat Basic Color Terms Metacognition Supports Denomination Change.Humberto Moreira, Julio Lillo & Leticia Álvaro - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Two experiments compared “Red-Green” dichromats’ empirical and metacognized capacities to discriminate basic color categories and to use the corresponding basic color terms. A first experiment used a 102-related-colors set for a pointing task to identify all the stimuli that could be named with each BCT by each R-G dichromat type. In a second experiment, a group of R-G dichromats estimated their difficulty discriminating BCCs-BCTs in a verbal task. The strong coincidences between the results derived from the pointing and the verbal (...)
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  • A Theory of Sentience.Austen Clar (ed.) - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    Drawing on the findings of neuroscience, this text proposes and defends the hypothesis that the various modalities of sensation share a generic form that the author, Austen Clark, calls feature-placing.
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  • An Opponent-Process Theory of Motivation: I. Temporal Dynamics of Affect.Richard L. Solomon & John D. Corbit - 1974 - Psychological Review 81 (2):119-145.
  • Parallels Between Hearing and Seeing Support Physicalism.Stephen Handel & Molly L. Erickson - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):31-32.
    There are 2,000 hair cells in the cochlea, but only three cones in the retina. This disparity can be understood in terms of the differences between the physical characteristics of the auditory signal (discrete excitations and resonances requiring many narrowly tuned receptors) and those of the visual signal (smooth daylight excitations and reflectances requiring only a few broadly tuned receptors). We argue that this match supports the physicalism of color and timbre.
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  • Where in the World Color Survey is the Support for the Hering Primaries as the Basis for Color Categorization?Kimberly Jameson - 2010 - In Jonathan D. Cohen & Mohan Matthen (eds.), Color Ontology and Color Science. MIT Press. pp. 179--202.
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  • Necessary Ingredients of Consciousness: Integration of Psychophysical, Neurophysiological, and Consciousness Research for the Red-Green Channel.Ram Lakhan Pandey Vimal - 2009 - Vision Research Institute: Living Vision and Consciousness Research 1 (1).
    A general definition of consciousness is: ‘consciousness is a mental aspect of a system or a process, which is a conscious experience, a conscious function, or both depending on the context’, where the term context refers to metaphysical views, constraints, specific aims, and so on. One of the aspects of visual consciousness is the visual subjective experience (SE) or the first person experience that occurs/emerges in the visual neural-network of thalamocortical system (which includes dorsal and ventral visual pathways and frontal (...)
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  • Testing the Cross‐Cultural Generality of Hering's Theory of Color Appearance.Delwin T. Lindsey, Angela M. Brown & Ryan Lange - 2020 - Cognitive Science 44 (11).
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  • Vision Under Mesopic and Scotopic Illumination.Andrew J. Zele & Dingcai Cao - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  • Quality-Space Theory in Olfaction.Benjamin D. Young, Andreas Keller & David Rosenthal - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Quality-space theory (QST) explains the nature of the mental qualities distinctive of perceptual states by appeal to their role in perceiving. QST is typically described in terms of the mental qualities that pertain to color. Here we apply QST to the olfactory modalities. Olfaction is in various respects more complex than vision, and so provides a useful test case for QST. To determine whether QST can deal with the challenges olfaction presents, we show how a quality space (QS) could be (...)
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  • No Effect of Featural Attention on Body Size Aftereffects.Ian D. Stephen, Chloe Bickersteth, Jonathan Mond, Richard J. Stevenson & Kevin R. Brooks - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • The Impact of Stimuli Color in Lexical Decision and Semantic Word Categorization Tasks.Margarida V. Garrido, Marília Prada, Cláudia Simão & Gün R. Semin - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (8).
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  • Constraints on Perceptual Learning: Objects and Dimensions.Felice L. Bedford - 1995 - Cognition 54 (3):253-297.
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  • Acquisition of the Meaning of the Word Orange Requires Understanding of the Meanings of Red, Pink, and Purple : Constructing a Lexicon as a Connected System.Noburo Saji, Mutsumi Imai & Michiko Asano - 2020 - Cognitive Science 44 (1).
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  • Ways of Coloring: Comparative Color Vision as a Case Study for Cognitive Science.Evan Thompson, Adrian Palacios & Francisco J. Varela - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):1-26.
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  • Have Byrne & Hilbert Answered Hardin's Challenge?Adam Pautz - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):44-45.
    I argue that Byrne & Hilbert have not answered Hardin's objection to physicalism about color concerning the unitary-binary structure of the colors for two reasons. First, their account of unitary-binary structure seems unsatisfactory. Second, pace B&H, there are no physicalistically acceptable candidates to be the hue-magnitudes. I conclude with a question about the justification of physicalism about color.
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  • Byrne and Hilbert's Chromatic Ether.C. L. Hardin - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):32-33.
    Because our only access to color qualities is through their appearance, Byrne & Hilbert's insistence on a strict distinction between apparent colors and real colors leaves them without a principled way of determining when, if ever, we see colors as they really are.
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  • Perceptual Objects May Have Nonphysical Properties.Aaron Ben-Ze’ev - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):22-23.
    Byrne & Hilbert defend color realism, which assumes that: colors are properties of objects; these objects are physical; hence, colors are physical properties. I accept, agree that in a certain sense can be defended, but reject. Colors are properties of perceptual objects – which also have underlying physical properties – but they are not physical properties.
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  • Reductionism and Subjectivism Defined and Defended.Austen Clark - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):32-33.
  • Perceptual-Cognitive Universals as Reflections of the World.Roger N. Shepard - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (4):581-601.
    The universality, invariance, and elegance of principles governing the universe may be reflected in principles of the minds that have evolved in that universe – provided that the mental principles are formulated with respect to the abstract spaces appropriate for the representation of biologically significant objects and their properties. (1) Positions and motions of objects conserve their shapes in the geometrically fullest and simplest way when represented as points and connecting geodesic paths in the six-dimensional manifold jointly determined by the (...)
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  • Are Color Categories Innate or Internalized? Hypotheses and Implications.David Bimler - 2005 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 5 (3-4):265-292.
    The considerable agreement across languages in the way they categorize the color domain, despite independent historical development, demands an explanation. One option is to postulate a universal innate representation of the color categories, 'hardwired' into each observer's brain. An alternative is that observers internalize their color categories through a process of cultural transmission, constrained by some kind of 'optimality hypothesis' to account for the cross-language agreement. A number of optimality hypotheses are reviewed. It is tempting to believe that the vivid (...)
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  • Is Purple a Red and Blue Chessboard? Brentano on Colour Mixtures.Olivier Massin & Marion Hämmerli - 2017 - The Monist 100 (1):37-63.
    Can we maintain that purple seems composed of red and blue without giving up the impenetrability of the red and blue parts that compose it? Brentano thinks we can. Purple, according to him, is a chessboard of red and blue tiles which, although individually too small to be perceived, are together indistinctly perceived within the purple. After a presentation of Brentano’s solution, we raise two objections to it. First, Brentano’s solution commits him to unperceivable intentional objects (the chessboard’s tiles). Second, (...)
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  • Color Subjectivism is Not Supported by Color Reductionism.Tom Seppalainen - 2001 - Philosophica (Belgium) 68 (2):61-87.
    If all the participants in the color ontology debate are naturalists with good sciences on their side, how could color subjectivism win? The apparent reason is that subjectivism is supported by the opponent process theory that is a successful neurophysiological reduction of colors. We will argue that the real reason is the unique reductive methodology of the opponent paradigm. We will undermine subjectivism by arguing against the methodology.
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  • Proving Universalism Wrong Does Not Prove Relativism Right: Considerations on the Ongoing Color Categorization Debate.Yasmina Jraissati - 2013 - Philosophical Psychology (3):1-24.
    For over a century, the question of the relation of language to thought has been extensively discussed in the case of color categorization, where two main views prevail. The relativist view claims that color categories are relative while the universalistic view argues that color categories are universal. Relativists also argue that color categories are linguistically determined, and universalists that they are perceptually determined. Recently, the argument for the perceptual determination of color categorization has been undermined, and the relativist view has (...)
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  • Color Realism Redux.Alex Byrne & David R. Hilbert - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):52-59.
    Our reply is in three parts. The first part concerns some foundational issues in the debate about color realism. The second part addresses the many objections to the version of physicalism about color ("productance physicalism") defended in the target article. The third part discusses the leading alternative approaches and theories endorsed by the commentators.
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  • A Physicalist Relationist Theory of Color.Eliezer Mintz - unknown
    The nature of color is an open philosophical and scientific question. In this work I develop a physicalist relationist theory of color. So far, attempts to identify color as a physical property of objects have not been convincing because no physical property used by scientists seems to be well correlated with color sensations. I define a new physical property which I call transformance and show that transformance is 100% correlated with color sensations. Intuitively, transformance is a very general abstract physical (...)
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  • Naturalism and the Philosophy of Colour Ontology and Perception.Mazviita Chirimuuta - 2020 - Philosophy Compass 15 (2).
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  • More Than Mere Coloring: The Art of Spectral Vision.Kathleen A. Akins & John Lamping - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):26-27.
  • Proving Universalism Wrong Does Not Prove Relativism Right: Considerations on the Ongoing Color Categorization Debate.Yasmina Jraissati - 2014 - Philosophical Psychology 27 (3):401-424.
    For over a century, the question of the relation of language to thought has been extensively discussed in the case of color categorization, where two main views prevail. The relativist view claims that color categories are relative while the universalistic view argues that color categories are universal. Relativists also argue that color categories are linguistically determined, and universalists that they are perceptually determined. Recently, the argument for the perceptual determination of color categorization has been undermined, and the relativist view has (...)
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  • The 4th Dimension. Wittgenstein on Colour and Imagination.Tine Wilde - 2002 - In Christian Kanzian, Josef Quitterer & Edmund Runggaldier (eds.), Persons. An Interdisciplinary Approach. Papers of the 25th International Wittgenstein Symposium. Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society. pp. 284-286.
    In this paper I first discuss the colour-octahedron and the position of this model as an idealized system with respect to the remarks on colour-concepts in Remarks on Colour (RC). The next part examines the notion of aspect seeing in the light of the colour-octahedron and RC. From there a connection is made with On Certainty (OC). By linking the remarks on colour, seeing aspects and certainty, it may become clear that the investigations of Wittgenstein concerning colour and certainty direct (...)
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  • Does Optimal Partitioning Account for Universal Color Categorization?Yasmina Jraissati & Igor Douven - 2017 - PLoS ONE 12.
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  • Colour for Behavioural Success.Birgitta Dresp-Langley - 2018 - I-Perception 2 (9):1-23.
    Colour information not only helps sustain the survival of animal species by guiding sexual selection and foraging behaviour but also is an important factor in the cultural and technological development of our own species. This is illustrated by examples from the visual arts and from state-of-the-art imaging technology, where the strategic use of colour has become a powerful tool for guiding the planning and execution of interventional procedures. The functional role of colour information in terms of its potential benefits to (...)
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  • Confusing Structure and Function.Kenneth M. Steele - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):52-53.
  • Ecological Subjectivism?Christine A. Skarda - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):51-52.
  • What in the World Determines the Structure of Color Space?Roger N. Shepard - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):50-51.
  • Areas of Ignorance and Confusion in Color Science.Adam Reeves - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):49-50.
  • On Perceived Colors.Christa Neumeyer - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):49-49.
  • Colors Really Are Only in the Head.James A. McGilvray - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):48-49.
  • On Possible Perceptual Worlds and How They Shape Their Environments.Rainer J. Mausfeld, Reinhard M. Niederée & K. Dieter Heyer - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):47-48.
  • Color Vision: Content Versus Experience.Mohan Matthen - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):46-47.
  • A Mathematical Framework for Biological Color Vision.Laurence T. Maloney - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):45-46.